back to article USA kicks out China Unicom, but FCC still in pursuit

The United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has barred Chinese carrier China Unicom from operating in America. China Unicom Americas promotes a wide range of data carriage services and bills itself as "the trusted partner of US-based businesses seeking one-stop connectivity with China and beyond." But the FCC …

  1. ShadowSystems

    Now for all the rest...

    Every device with a China-produced bit of kit inside, the American government needs to force manufacturers to either rip&replace all those bits in favor of "clean" kit, or to change to purely American sources for said kit in the first place.

    Because if a foreign-controlled company has access to American infrastructure like nearly every cellphone on the planet, what's to stop them from "flipping a switch" to render all those devices into potential bombs?

    "That's not possible. It's only a cellphone." you say? And what about all those battery fires that caused airlines to refuse to allow battery-installed-devices aboard their planes?

    I'm sick of this dystopian ride & want off this rock. =-(

    1. fxkeh

      Re: Now for all the rest...

      Every device with a America-designed bit of kit inside, the EU needs to force manufacturers to either rip&replace all those bits in favor of "clean" kit, or to change to purely EU sources for said kit in the first place.

      Because if a foreign-controlled company has access to EU infrastructure like nearly every cellphone on the planet, what's to stop them from "flipping a switch" to render all those devices into potential bombs?

      (And repeat for whatever your preferred flavours of country and enemy are)

  2. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    As usual, no mention of National Security letters

    Everything the US can accuse Beijing of being capable of the US has already done, and is likely actively doing now.

    Any company based in the US is subject to recieving a National Security letter commanding it to hand over data or grant access to US spooks so they can check whatever they want. If you get such a letter, it is forbidden by law to talk about it and you must obey its contents.

    It is quite rich to see Uncle Sam blaming Chinese companies for being subject to Beijing when the US has enshrined its own total dominance in its judicial oversight.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: As usual, no mention of National Security letters

      No need for NSLs, there are plenty of Federal laws that will give them access, the latest being the Cloud Act, and I assume Microsoft's help here was to simply legitimise what is already happening anyway.

      Just hook up a sniffer and watch how much trafic goes to Microsoft. If you're into graphics, ditto for Adobe who has quietly built up a near monopoly on fonts. Try buying a dedicated webfont - you have to work very hard not to be forced to use Typekit, their equivalent of Google Fonts.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I have a different deja-vu here..

    .. because that pretty much reads exactly as the arguments for zapping Safe Harbor and Privacy Shield in Europe (and, more recently, the declaration of Google Analytics being incompatible with GDPR), and it's worth noting that most US comms manufacturers still do not allow screening of their devices and code (unlike that "evil" Huawei).

    So I'm sorry, but I am less and less a believer, not helped by the fact that this always seems to happen precisely to the entities that perform better than their US counterparts by either simply working more efficiently or being more advanced.

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