back to article Joe Danger rides to the rescue as ageing title tugs at the heartstrings

In these times of political uncertainty, economic upheaval, and an ongoing pandemic, it’s heartening to reveal a human story in software development. joe danger Screenshot from Joe Danger (iOS Remastered 2022) Hello Games, the UK company behind the planet-hopping hit No Man's Sky, has resurrected its first title in response …

  1. heyrick Silver badge
    Happy

    Well, that's a sweet story to end the week with. Well done them.

  2. Irony Deficient Silver badge

    “It’s sad that games slowly rot and many disappear.”

    For game companies that are unwilling to make older games functional on newer operating systems, perhaps a field of “hobby projects” could bloom by releasing the games’ source code under a suitable no-commercial-exploitation licence to let hobbyists have a go at it.

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

    2. Ken Hagan Gold badge

      Re: “It’s sad that games slowly rot and many disappear.”

      Nice idea in general, but it probably wouldn't have helped in this case because the target audience wanted everything to stay the same. That's unlikely to be the outcome if you put the source up for tinkering by enthusiasts.

      1. Richard 12 Silver badge

        Re: “It’s sad that games slowly rot and many disappear.”

        Looking at previous examples - these games do stay the same.

        For example, the Freespace Source Code Project lets you play that original game with the original content on modern hardware. As far as I can tell it looks and feels exactly the same.

        There's also a pile of remastered models and a huge array of modded content, of course.

      2. excession

        Re: “It’s sad that games slowly rot and many disappear.”

        One particular example is OpenTTD where the updated game retains the identical look and feel to the original.

        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenTTD

  3. Grunchy Bronze badge

    I’m pleased as heck that Ed Hobbs stepped up and made a modern windows (steam) version of his “Castles of Doctor Creep,” which was a fiendishly difficult C64 game from way back, and which I still never did get through all the advanced castles. Seriously, just try to get through Sylvania (the first one) in less than an hour. It’s merciless! Probably as bad as dark souls, or cuphead.

  4. -bat.

    These guys deserve a huge amount of credit for doing this. I have an autistic son, who loves playing Geometry Dash. or did, as it doesn't run properly on the latest version of iOS and his iPad updated. No sign of an update for the game, and I suspect there wont be one. I see him occasionally re-opening it just to see if it works again. He's OK, not utterly distraught - but it was one of his favourite things, and one day it just stopped working.

    1. MiguelC Silver badge

      Not sure if it runs on Safari, but there is an online version at https://geometrydash-free.com/

  5. that one in the corner

    Backwards compatibility

    is not a thing in the iOS world?

    Not having an iOS device I have no idea how much it changes between releases (and my Android device hasn't updated for years, so don't know much about that either) but I had the impression that Apple frowned upon apps not following the published rules or they wouldn't get into the store. So I'm assuming that this game wasn't poking bits of memory it oughtn't, which would have been *the* reason to not be surprised it didn't just continue working.

    Naively assuming that, just because a PC exe I've not bothered recompiling since 1999 still runs as well today as it did back then (doing its rather dull task), 'phone apps might have a decent longevity as well.

    Whatever the case, Very Well Done Indeed to the bods at Hello Games.

    1. Richard 12 Silver badge
      Unhappy

      Re: Backwards compatibility

      Apple remove APIs and even change hardware requirements very often.

      There is a long trail of software and hardware accessories that no longer work on any Apple devices you can currently buy, and it's not because the developer used something undocumented.

      It's because Apple changed the operating system and hardware platform out from under them, and it either wasn't worth it for the developers to spend the time or it wasn't technically feasible.

      Software for Apple devices has a very short window in which it can be made to work. It's ridiculous.

    2. Korev Silver badge

      Re: Backwards compatibility

      Naively assuming that, just because a PC exe I've not bothered recompiling since 1999 still runs as well today as it did back then (doing its rather dull task), 'phone apps might have a decent longevity as well.

      The exe itself may run, but many bits of 32bit software can't be installed on 64bit Windows due to them using a 16bit installer

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