back to article What a cluster fsck: New scheduling code plus Intel's Alder Lake CPU mix equals a slower Linux kernel 5.16

The mixture of performance and efficiency CPUs in Intel's 12th-gen Core processors, code-named Alder Lake, hasn't just caused problems for some Windows gamers – it's led to complications for Linux. Phoronix' Michael Larabel noticed that Release Candidate 1 of the future kernel ran slower than expected on Alder Lake …

  1. Brewster's Angle Grinder Silver badge

    Thanks Intel's Ettins.

    I can hear the throbbing of the devs' heads from here...

    I initially wrote "dev's heads". And it's entirely possible a dev's head will have bifurcated by the time they've sorted this out.

    1. Will Godfrey Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Thanks Intel's Ettins.

      Could be worse... the RAMAns always do things in threes

      on a more serious note. I wonder how much raw performance is lost by various firmware stunts pretending the kit's got more than it actually has.

  2. CrackedNoggin Bronze badge

    Drawing the line.

    On the design level, is this hardware architecture something that Intel and other hardware providers should provide a kernel module for and which offers knobs which can be twiddled at the compiler, interpreter, or application level, or is it something that intrinsically changes the design of the Kernel? Given the infinite number of ways that hardware can be optimized, I would hope it is more of the former and less of the latter.

    1. the spectacularly refined chap Silver badge

      Re: Drawing the line.

      On the design level, is this hardware architecture something that Intel and other hardware providers should provide a kernel module for and which offers knobs which can be twiddled at the compiler, interpreter, or application level, or is it something that intrinsically changes the design of the Kernel?

      More the latter. This is essentially a scheduling issue. The scheduler can be made modular (indeed in some of the true microkernels it isn't even a kernel service) but things in Linux are not arranged so conveniently.

  3. Stumo
    Paris Hilton

    With processor specific tweaks like this, in what I assume is code run regularly and therefore performance sensitive, do people without these fancy processors see a performance drop because of the redundant code, or is there some cunning boot time optimisation (since I don't think anyone supports hot swapping the CPU)

    1. W.S.Gosset Silver badge
      Thumb Up

      > I don't think anyone supports hot swapping the CPU

      Oh, I do, I'm all for it.

    2. hoola Silver badge

      The old Digital Non-Stop could do CPU hot swap if I remember correctly.

      1. Alistair
        Windows

        HP is still making the line. And yes, they hotswap CPUs. Not quite like hotswapping a USB stick, but still done live.

      2. Julian Bradfield

        And of course System Z and its ancestors have had hot-swappable cpus for several decades.

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