back to article Indian PC market sets all-time records as Q3 shipments top 2019 total

India's PC market has achieved new sales records, according to analyst firm IDC. Sales of what IDC calls traditional PCs – lappies, desktops and workstations – rose 30 per cent compared to the same time last year, reaching 4.55 million units. That's about five per cent of the global market – rather behind India's 17 per cent …

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