back to article EasyJet flight loadsheet snafu caused by software 'code errors' says UK safety agency

An EasyJet flight to Edinburgh Airport took off with wrongly loaded passengers and baggage because of IT network congestion causing computer systems to interact "in a manner which had neither been designed nor predicted." Last-minute aircraft changes followed by a critical but slow-running IT system meant the Airbus A321neo …

  1. SkippyBing

    'The DCS used the aircraft registration letters as its validation for the aircraft, even though there was no cross-check linking the registration to the aircraft type.'

    They should get a subscription to Flight Radar 24, they have all that information. As do the CAA. As should Easyjet considering they own the aircraft!!

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Have they thought of painting it on the side of the plane, rather than just have a discrete little "320i" badge on the boot?

      1. SkippyBing

        You'd think that would help, one of the US carriers managed to fly the wrong A320 to Hawaii from LA. The right one had ETOPS* in large letters on the nose gear door, the wrong one didn't...

        *Extended-range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards to indicate that aircraft was fine to fly over the ocean without anywhere to divert to.

        1. Ol'Peculier
          Mushroom

          Or "Engines Turn or Passengers Swim"

          1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

            To be far how many Americans would know that there is an ocean between LA and Hawaii ?

            One of the usual idiot congresspersons was claiming that Hawaii's spike in Covid wasn't due to tourists but was all the fault of illegal immigrants - presumably building a wall would help.

            1. WolfFan Silver badge

              It certainly would. If I can throw the idiots in question off of said wall. Optionally there might be hungry large land carnivores at the bottom of the wall. Komodo dragons for preference, but leopards, or larger cats would do nicely.

              1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

                How far away is Isla Nublar? There's some nice walls there with "interesting" animals on the other side that might appreciate some easily caught food.

            2. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: how many Americans would know that there is an ocean between LA and Hawaii ?

              I know there is an ocean between them. Which is why I was so surprised to see a car with a Hawaii license on it while in the LA area.

    2. Screwed

      They only own some of the aircraft they operate - about half the A321-Neos, it appears. Leasing the rest.

      https://www.statista.com/statistics/753833/number-of-aircraft-in-the-easyjet-fleet-by-ownership/

      Does it make any difference? Not really.

      1. anothercynic Silver badge

        Even if you lease the jet, you generally know *what* you've leased and have the correct loading sheet for it.

        Well... most airlines do anyway.

    3. Paul Hovnanian Silver badge

      Aircraft registration letters should be unique and properly identify the instance of aircraft. There might have been a problem linking the instance to the type in some database. This may be the 'code problem' the article refers to. But the article also mentions congested IT systems. Which suggests that the database was backed up and someone's terminal delivered a (wrong version) cached copy. Or something like that.

      In my days at Boeing, I worked with a shop floor document delivery dystem that was designed to 'fail active'. Rather than deliver 'something', it would post an error message* to the effect that some back end server could not be queried. So we didn't deliver the wrong paper. We delivered nothing until the problem was resolved. Some managers were not happy with this because they felt it was more important to keep the shop doing something, even if it was the wrong thing.

      *The error screen included an animated GIF of a stick figure bashing his head on a PC keyboard. Just to ensure that operators not accustomed to parsing cryptic error popups would recognize that something was wrong.

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        "Some managers were not happy with this because they felt it was more important to keep the shop doing something, even if it was the wrong thing."

        Sounds like a training scheme for politicians. "We must be seen to be doing *something*"

      2. jtaylor Bronze badge

        "We delivered nothing until the problem was resolved. Some managers were not happy with this because they felt it was more important to keep the shop doing something, even if it was the wrong thing."

        Your team had a lovely response. It sounds like some other managers figured that "quality is not my job."

  2. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

    Weight of passengers

    Is this the system that uses an estimate of passenger's weight based on a very large, and therefore accurate, survey of bomber crews in 1945?

    1. SkippyBing

      Re: Weight of passengers

      It may have been based on that originally but the current weights have been revised relatively recently. I think adults went up to 80kg at some point this century in response to the increase in mass of, well air passengers.

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: Weight of passengers

        I was on a flight on some largish Boeing when they asked a dozen of us to move to the front of the cabin for takeoff.

        Given that we were flying out of Houston and the other passengers all appeared to be either Sumo wrestlers or going to competitive eating event - I suspect the pilot took one look and thought; fsck what the balance software says

        1. My-Handle Silver badge

          Re: Weight of passengers

          Always good to have someone in control who knows why stuff happens in a particular way. Mainly because they're the ones who always notice when something's gotten screwed up.

    2. wolfetone Silver badge

      Re: Weight of passengers

      It is, to an extent.

      There was a crash of Air Midwest 5481, where the plane was overloaded and crashed in to the ground shortly after takeoff. The centre of gravity etc was pushed right back.

      The NTSB worked out that the average weights used were more in line with what they were in 1936, and stated that carriers should use actual weights rather than averages. But (according to Wikipedia) 70% of the airlines in America still use averages.

      I don't know if Europe uses different weights but yeah, you're not far wrong in your assumption.

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: Weight of passengers

        > carriers should use actual weights rather than averages

        I think that was specifically for these very small aeroplanes. I've been weighed on flights in the far North where you are wearing half of an REI store. It's done very discreetly so you don't see the actual number.

        I don't imagine actual weight difference of 300 passengers on a 575 ton A380 makes that much difference.

        Although I do think it is unfair that you get charged $1M/kg for overweight bags full of kit when Jabba the Hut's big brother is allowed to overflow into 3 seats for free.

        1. Ian Johnston Silver badge

          Re: Weight of passengers

          The weight of 300 passengers doesn't make much difference but the position of the weight of 300 passengers certainly does. 24 tonnes acting in front of or behind where the control surfaces expect can ruin your whole day.

          1. teknopaul Silver badge

            Re: Weight of passengers

            How come planes can't measure tire or shocks pressure to work out what they really have and how well balanced they are?

            1. Captain Scarlet

              Re: Weight of passengers

              Most planes have 3 sets of wheels having contact with the tarmac, I'm not sure if that's enough to accurate check if it is centred as all the weight tends to be within those wheels.

              Edit: I know nothing about how planes are built, so high possibility I'm barking up the wrong tree!

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Weight of passengers

                It has been commented before that the lift generated by a parked plane's wings in a wind - will seriously affect any wheel surface weighing.

                1. Dave314159ggggdffsdds Silver badge

                  Re: Weight of passengers

                  Commented - and debunked in other comments with some back of the envelope maths. The wind would have to be strong, and hit the wings head-on, to generate any significant lift. Windage is more of an issue. But the main one is that the attitude is completely different in the air to on the ground, so wheel weights don't help.

            2. PeterM42
              Facepalm

              Re: Weight of passengers

              Cost!

              1. Paul Hovnanian Silver badge

                Re: Weight of passengers

                Failure modes.

                The landing gear load cells become part of the MEL (minimum equipment list) and you can't fly with one inop.

            3. jtaylor Bronze badge

              Re: Weight of passengers

              "How come planes can't measure tire or shocks pressure to work out what they really have and how well balanced they are?"

              That's a question I have asked as well. Here is how they measure the weight and calculate the balance of an aircraft. Note that, because the goal is to figure the balance when it's flying, they not only block the wind, but they also use jacks to tilt the aircraft to the angle it flies at. The procedure is a right pain so it's done only when something changes (like a repair) and then they write down the numbers for reference.

              https://www.eaa.org/eaa/aircraft-building/BuilderResources/while-youre-building/building-articles/weight-and-balance/weight-and-balance

              tl;dr: The balance while flying is different from weight on wheels.

        2. usbac

          Re: Weight of passengers

          In light aircraft I always calculated weight and balance with actual weights of my passengers before takeoff. It's sometimes a delicate question, but you have to look at a person and deem whether they are telling you the truth.

          I did know a pilot that carried a scale with him. I never went quite that far.

          1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

            Re: Weight of passengers

            The checkin desk had a scale that you stood on with your hand baggage - so you could always claim it was a very heavy laptop

            1. anothercynic Silver badge

              Re: Weight of passengers

              This used to be the fun and games in Africa... "Do we have enough power to get all these people off the ground?" with actual weight. But back then people didn't carry 'carry-on' luggage going into the cabin weighing half a ton (I jest, kinda)... it used to be a coat, a book and (for women) a handbag.

              Before the Lockerbie bombing, there were times when luggage simply had to be left behind to get planes off the runway before it ran out, and it would get loaded the next day. Inevitably that meant your luggage was not on the belt when you landed, but hey, at least you didn't run off the end into a ravine or tinder dry bush.

              1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

                Re: Weight of passengers

                You are still allowed to not load luggage - although on wide bodies there is generally enough air-cargo that can be bumped first. It's expensive to leave passenger's luggage behind.

                It's assumed safe because the individual terrorist doesn't know that their bag is one of the ones to fly on a different plane.

          2. dogcatcher

            Re: Weight of passengers

            In my army days I had to declare either my personal weight or all-up weight with kit and weapon, to any pilot who bothered to ask. The ones flying those liitle dinky rotary-wing aircraft seemed to be more concerned when several of us piled into the last seat.

            1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

              Re: Weight of passengers

              Army helicopter pilots can do adding up ?

              Especially in stones and lbs = that's officer stuff

              1. Eclectic Man Silver badge

                Re: Weight of passengers

                Helicopter pilots have to be very clever. Flying a helicopter is much more difficult than a fixed wing aircraft as the direction you are pointing in is not necessarily (in fact rarely) the direction of travel. Plus you have the collective to determine whether you are going 'up' or 'down'. The control column has bias settings so that you can get it to remain in a certain attitude and don't have to fight against the neutral position for ages (which can be very tiring).

                I know this because I learnt to fly sailplanes / gliders as a teenager and once did some consultancy for a helicopter simulator system, which I then got to fly. It was really hard work, and I have a great admiration for helicopter pilots since. (I've also flown, under supervision, a light aircraft, which was easier than a helicopter.)

                1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

                  Re: Weight of passengers

                  That means it takes extreme skill/practice/aptitude - it doesn't mean they can count past 10 without taking their shoes and socks off.

                  1. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

                    Re: Weight of passengers

                    Oh come on, they should be able to count to 12 without taking their shoes and socks off. Although they might have to start again from the beginning if they go over.

                    1. Anonymous Coward
                      Anonymous Coward

                      Re: Weight of passengers

                      Can I remind you that Prince Doesn't-Look-Much-Like-His-Dad-Does-He with his dodgy O-level in art history was a helicopter pilot.

                      1. lglethal Silver badge
                        Trollface

                        Re: Weight of passengers

                        Actually it was the Prince who does look like his dad that was the Helicopter Pilot. The Prince who doesnt look like his dad was the one that was a grunt in the Army...

                        1. molletts

                          Re: Weight of passengers

                          Prince Harry was also a helicopter pilot - he flew the Apache (a pretty cool chopper by all accounts) in the Army Air Corps.

                          And yes, speaking as a fixed-wing pilot, helicopters are hilariously hard to fly.

                          1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

                            Re: Weight of passengers

                            >Prince Harry was also a helicopter pilot - he flew the Apache

                            He was the one who was demonstrating the value of peace and democracy by having an hereditary monarch shooting them from a helicopter gunship

                        2. Dave314159ggggdffsdds Silver badge

                          Re: Weight of passengers

                          They both look like their dads...

                      2. Anonymous Coward
                        Anonymous Coward

                        Re: Weight of passengers

                        Said Prince does look like his uncle, though. And his grandfather.

                        Nothing to see here, move on.

                2. werdsmith Silver badge

                  Re: Weight of passengers

                  Flying a helicopter is much more difficult than a fixed wing aircraft as the direction you are pointing in is not necessarily (in fact rarely) the direction of travel.

                  Same for fixed wing aircraft. Track and heading rarely the same. You ought to be aware of that will all your experience. Did you ever learn nav?

                  The control column has bias settings so that you can get it to remain in a certain attitude and don't have to fight against the neutral position for ages (which can be very tiring).

                  Trim. Fixed wing aircraft also have the trim you describe. Even the most basic have elevator trim. Rudder and ailerons can also be trimmed on some types.

                  I found rotary and fixed wing about the same, but different in different areas. The flare at landing a fixed wing took a bit of practice, as did the roll out on a tailwheel aircraft. The hover taxi in a heli took some time to learn.

          3. Jim Mitchell

            Re: Weight of passengers

            The only time I've been actually weighed was for helicopter sight seeing tour and for skydiving, both being rather small aircraft. The skydiving was tandem, and I was bolted to a instructor who could probably walk around with me bolted to his chest with minimal issue. I don't even think my feet would touch the ground.

            1. EvilDrSmith Silver badge

              Re: Weight of passengers

              If I recall, if you do the Auckland sky jump, they check your weight (but not your sanity)

          4. Martin Gregorie Silver badge

            Re: Weight of passengers

            Standard procedure in a glider, where those on-board ARE the ballast needed to put the balance point (Centre of Gravity, CG) in the right place, so everybody onboard *must* know their weight while wearing a parachute and a W&B check is done before flight.

            If you're flying a single seater its up to you to know your weight with parachute, to check it against the W&B table before flying, and add additional nose weight if you're below the minimum pilot weight.

            If the glider is a two seater the same applies with the weight of the person in the rear seat included only in the total pilot weight: only the weight of the bod in front is used to check whether the glider is balanced. BTW, the reason the instructor always sits in the rear seat is because that is on or close to the CG, so when a new pilot is sent solo the instructor can get out without affecting the glider's balance.

            1. Neil Barnes Silver badge

              Re: Weight of passengers

              My first day of paragliding training I was weighed, to ensure that I got the right size of glider. The one I got was fondly known as Big Bertha (I weighed over 80kg then, and fifteen years later and 20-oddkg lighter, I still do...)

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Weight of passengers

                On my one and only static line parachute jump there were different canopy types being selectively allocated. I was given the standard "male" one - whereas my petite girlfriend was given one that would make a slower descent.

        3. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Weight of passengers

          In a past life I used to fly regularly on Saab 2000s and all passengers and their hand luggage were weighed before flying. Seats weren't allocated and if there weren't many pax it was pretty normal for the cabin crew to shift us around to balance the plane. On one flight when it landed the captain came on the intercom and told us to all remain seated until the baggage and freight had been unloaded. The plane was a bit tail heavy and he was concerned that if the we got off before the baggage and freight were unloaded the nosewheel might come off the ground.

          1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

            Re: Weight of passengers

            The Italian Job maneuver ?

          2. anothercynic Silver badge

            Re: Weight of passengers

            That sounds almost like BA at London City... Was it BA at London City? ;-)

        4. hoola Silver badge

          Re: Weight of passengers

          If I remember correctly I think that the Trislander aircraft this is used for some hopping between obscure airfields has a prop put under the tail so that when it is loaded (or boarded) it does not fall over.

          1. dak

            Re: Weight of passengers

            ATR-72 has a tail prop. We always had to wait until the cabin crew had nipped out and hung it on the back before we could stand up.

    3. anothercynic Silver badge

      Re: Weight of passengers

      There is one airline that actually prices its tickets based on weight: Samoa Air.

      But yes, the 'average passenger weight' has been upped but not by all that much. TUI probably tries to be *really* clever with average weights for men, women and kids to fly as lean as possible.

      I've had it on a small flight across the Gulf of Bothnia (Finland to Estonia) where I was asked to move back 3 seats to give the little ATR taking us across on a hot day a better CoG, given that most sat either behind (closer to the exit) or around the wings. I like it up front. And I've had it on flights from H-A-H airports where people had their seats moved to help the plane get off the ground better by shifting the CoG back. The crew then allowed us to change our seats back to where we originally wanted to sit once we were in cruise.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Weight of passengers

        On a 737 from Bloemfontein to Jo'burg two of us had been allocated seats "in the wrong place". The aircraft's front section had been partitioned - presumably for cargo space - and we were sitting by the crew's internal door. After take-off they moved us to spare seats at the rear of the plane. When asked why we weren't moved earlier - we were told that passengers' positions were maintained for identification in case of a take-off crash.

        For that short journey the plane took off - climbed to cruising altitude - then soon descended to land. Apparently without ever diverting from a straight line. It is the only time I landed with passengers still clutching their free drinks and snack trays.

        1. anothercynic Silver badge

          Re: Weight of passengers

          That's funny! The two cities are a 3 hour drive apart... How long was that flight? 40 minutes? :-)

          Joburg and Cape Town are a 2 hour flight compared to a 12-14 hour drive (did that twice, never again).

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Weight of passengers

            Google road journey calculator suggests you had your foot down. Bloem 247 miles (397km). Cape Town 871 miles (1402km).

            The 1973 fuel crisis led to 50mph speed restrictions. A police patrol was waiting to catch motorists doing the usual few mph over the limit in a dorp en route to Cape. They were left standing when a car swept past at about 100mph.

            An unlicensed teenager reckoned he had done the longer Pretoria to Cape Town run in 10 hours.

            A colleague had a BMW 2002. On the motorway one day he showed me its speed - very smooth with the speedometer showing 120kmh - oops! a British imported car - mph!

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Not a trolling comment

    What factors determined that the DCS software performed so badly with a frequently changing schedule?

    I can appreciate the calculations might be complex when working out optimum balance but we’re talking hundreds of data points, not thousands, or even millions

    And once a loadsheet has been created which I imagine contains passenger seating and pallet loading plan - can’t be larger than a few kb? Maybe a meg? Can it? So there should have been no issue sending this to the loaders

    And despite the chaos, are we talking about a dozen flights or thousands?

    Ok ok ok, I get the 5 minute window / manual entry thing, but otherwise? We’re talking a few thousand data points per plane x a few hundred planes (max) x a few kilobytes, maybe megabytes, per plane. Computationally at least, a 386 could’ve handled that

    See title. Not trolling, but as a developer, recently, of load scheduling as it happens, I’m curious as to why and would like to know what I’m missing

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Re: Not a trolling comment

      I imagine a formal requirement.

      Req: 3.141592654.... A load sheet shall be generated before boarding the aircraft

      Therefore there is no mechanism for generating a new load sheet after boarding has started because that would be illegal. The formal requirements would be that in this event the flight is cancelled, a new load sheet is calculated, along with a new flight plan and a ripple effect that makes 1000s of flights delayed.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Not a trolling comment

      > We’re talking a few thousand data points per plane x a few hundred planes (max) x a few kilobytes, maybe megabytes, per plane. Computationally at least, a 386 could’ve handled that

      You're assuming that all the data is available locally. The systems I worked with at Heathrow often took data from a data bus, but that data was sometimes only put onto the bus at 5 minute intervals (usually because it came from one particular overloaded legacy system running on ancient hardware that no one dared try and upgrade because it was so critical).

      So the calculation takes only a couple of seconds but the software has to wait several minutes for all the data to be marshalled. To make matters worse, if the software just queues up changes, without checking to see if the latest change invalidates one that's already in the queue, then it could wait up to 5 mins for the first change then another 5 mins before the second happens.

      At the end of the day the pilot took off anyway - so it clearly wasn't that critical.

      1. ortunk

        Re: Not a trolling comment

        Once debugged a problem like that, ayatems concerned were taking 15 minutes however truck did it in 13-14 and had to wait for data at the door.

        Solution all syatems start triggering every 3 seconds :))

      2. anothercynic Silver badge

        Re: Not a trolling comment

        That sums it up really... A clever bit of software curation would look if any queued changes could be merged... But that requires changes.

    3. hoola Silver badge

      Re: Not a trolling comment

      I dunno, isn't there some sort of machine that can work these sorts of calculations out really quickly?

      I am sure that some sort of device exists that can compute numbers and information, some can even provide a paper copy that is human readable.

      Just musing......

  4. Version 1.0 Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    The score

    Humans working: 1

    SWapps working: 0

  5. GlenP Silver badge

    I recall an internal US flight into Rhode Island IIRC (but may have been somewhere in Michigan) where the pilot stuck his head out of the cockpit door and asked, "Can some of you move nearer the back?"

    Passengers had been loaded solely from the front of the aircraft and it was fairly empty.

    1. TheRealRoland
      Stop

      Now, when flights are fairly empty, that's ok. However, when i have to trade in an aisle seat for something else, because i have to move, but now transformer-fold my 6ft6 frame into a cramped area, no thanks.

      This mostly happens on rinkydink planes anyways.

      Also, happy i'm not flying anymore. My body is very thankful for not having to endure that abuse every week...

  6. ortunk
    Devil

    Batch Interaction Layer

    So cron jobs and fetch scripts as usual, a BOFH was there handling the auditor it seems

  7. CzechNeck
    Facepalm

    Almost identical incident in Jan 2020

    The same thing happened back in Jan 2020 on a WhizzAir* flight from Luton to Prague.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-54477819

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5f5a0251d3bf7f7238f22fd2/Airbus_A321-231_G-WUKG_10-20.pdf

    * Neither source mention the airline name but according to the CAA, G-WUKG is registered to WhizzAir in 2018. (https://siteapps.caa.co.uk/g-info/)

  8. Clausewitz 4.0
    Devil

    Onboard Computers

    "These include directly communicating with the aircraft's onboard computers."

    Interesting.

  9. Herring`

    Don't the pilots have trim wheels? They should look on it as a challenge.

  10. MOH

    "The various elements of the IT system architecture do not 'talk' directly to each other but operate through a variety of interfaces," found the AAIB, adding this "makes errors and inaccuracies more likely."

    Huh?

    1. PeterM42
      IT Angle

      Oh yes they do

      "The various elements of the IT system architecture do not 'talk' directly to each other but operate through a variety of interfaces"

      I used to work in IT for a significant UK airline and can tell you - YES, there are LOTS of interfaces between different parts of "the system(s)" which get you to your holiday destinations.

    2. hoola Silver badge

      I suppose it depends on you definition of "Interface"......

      An oik telling a member of the cabin crew something is an "Interface".

  11. Allonymous Coward

    One thing I always find interesting (in a good way) is how seriously this sort of thing is taken in safety-critical fields like aviation. There was no harm done, but an incident was raised to AAIB and fully investigated, with some actionable findings.

    A lot of places - probably including mine - the most it would've resulted in is a "lesson learned" along the lines of "Oh that's an interesting failure mode of the system, we should document that in Confluence and try not to do it". It might not have even gone that far.

    1. PeterM42
      Thumb Up

      Full investigation.....

      ....stops UNPLEASANT THINGS happening.

      I used to support some of the reporting systems as well.

      Better pilots know WHAT can go wrong, than repeat someone else's mistakes.

    2. jtaylor Bronze badge

      "how seriously this sort of thing is taken in safety-critical fields like aviation"

      I love that! There's a clear focus on how to prevent problems. In some other industries, response to a problem might be "It was Little Timmy what done it. Solution: push him down a well."

      In aviation, problems are not easily blamed on individuals. Okay, Little Timmy printed the wrong load sheet, but why was the wrong one even there? How did—I don't know—Dispatch have different aircraft data than Crew? How could we have prevented the problem and how can we catch it better next time?

  12. werdsmith Silver badge

    The Concorde is an example of an aircraft that used fuel to trim. It could pump feul from the rearmost tanks to help trim the aircraft for whatever phase of flight.

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      All big aircraft use fuel to trim.

      It's just that at take off when you are full of fuel - and quite busy - it's trickier

  13. Bruce Ordway

    Complex systems

    "...alert...spot the...discrepancy..."

    Sounds like the kind of person I'm a big fan of.

    Systems and automation... compared to a person with "know how" who can evaluate situations and perform tasks "on the fly"?

  14. Potemkine! Silver badge

    I still don't get why aircraft aren't able to measure their own weight, with ad-hoc sensors on the landing gear (with a three times redundancy, of course)

    1. werdsmith Silver badge

      Didn't read the other comments then.

      1. Potemkine! Silver badge

        I did, but I still don't understand!

        The 'wind excuse' is debunked as explained, and knowing the stress on all wheels I don't see why it would be impossible to calculate the position of the center of mass. It would be anyway much more precise than the estimation made by companies with outdated statistics.

        1. werdsmith Silver badge

          Well actually some aircraft do have self-weighing systems. But they are rubbish and nobody trusts them.

          I sense an opportunity for you.

  15. RogerT

    Surely this is safety critical

    Surely this process is safety critical and should be certified in the same manner as an aircraft?

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