back to article Ethereum dev admits helping North Korea mine crypto-bucks, faces 20 years jail

A US citizen has admitted to helping the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) to establish cryptocurrency capabilities and faces up to 20 years jail for his actions. The Department of Justice (DoJ) on Monday revealed that Ethereum developer Virgil Griffith, a resident of Singapore, hatched plans in 2018 to help an …

  1. tiggity Silver badge

    DPRK as whipping boy

    Shame the US act like a bully with a big stick

    I have no issues with DPRK sanctions, would just like to see a few more countries alos looked at

    However, if we are thinking about human rights abuses..

    Saudi Arabia have form (and majority of 911 attackers were Saudi if the US want a "danger" angle as well as human rights) - but too may financial entanglements between US and Saudi for that to happen.

    China have form - ask Tibetans, Uyghurs etc. But again lots of financial involvement, and even worse China are also a bully with a big stick.

    I could go on and on listing dodgy countries, but its only the weedy one with no money loss attached that gets hammered, show some consistency (and balls) & apply morality based sanctions more widely.

    1. Pascal Monett Silver badge
      Trollface

      I'm sorry, you're expecting a polititian to have balls these days ?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        At least half of them don't anyway. ;-)

      2. TDog

        Well the middle kingdom seems to have lots of balls, and by my standards acts like bollocks.

        Their hyperinflationary building spree seems to be coming back to cause them issues - now the only question is how far they should be pushed. Personally I would push them all the way into the economic catastrophe they have caused upon themselves. I see absolutely no reason to give them an easy way out when they have made it quite clear that they are determined to live in a world that only matches to their model of the world. I feel sad about the sequalae that will affect their own populace but am always mindful of how they would treat me and my fellow [Liberals, Tories, Socialists, Anarchists. etc] had they control over my state.

        The only way I am aware of is using their rules of Social Darwinism to allow them to fail. I would like to know a plausible alternative and shall watch the comments with interest.

  2. Terry 6 Silver badge

    Stupidity and greed

    Irrespective of the rights and wrongs that others have already posted about. He acted in breech of sanctions, in ways that he couldn't hide. It's like robbing a store full of security cameras, next door to a police station while wearing a name badge.

    1. martinusher Silver badge

      Re: Stupidity and greed

      Its difficult to tell what's in breach of sanctions these days. To give you some idea of the problems there was an article in the Washington Post recently about some people who needed to leave Afghanistan but the only border crossing that was open to them was to Iran. The Iranians were helpful, and got them out of Afghanistan and onto their destination. The only problem was that if they got an Iranian stamp in their passport then the US would bar them from entering.

      We're not very good at joined up thinking in the US. We throw around sanctions like its the global growth industry until nobody really knows what's legal and what's not. After all, that Huawei lady got arrested in Canada for some kind of technical breach of US law caused by the US reimposing sanctions on Iran after abrogating an agreement because some politician decided they didn't like it. (...and for every politicians making noise there's an army of mid-level bureaucrats who interpret the rules any way they think fit)

  3. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

    Virgil

    You can't trust a Thunderbird? Who knew?

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    But isn't crypto legitimate?

    Entertaining that the powers that be are worried that NK can use cryptocurrency technology to launder money and evade sanctions, but those same powers are seen to be entirely happy that their own "criminals" can use crypto currency to launder the proceeds of criminal activity, avoid taxes, etc.

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