back to article UK's Digital Markets Unit – the Big Tech watchdog – remains toothless for now but statutory powers due this year

Tech giants such as Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google face fines of up to 10 per cent of turnover if they're found to be in serious breach of new regulations being considered by the UK government. The proposals – to be adopted by the Digital Markets Unit (DMU), a fledgling division trailed last November that sits within the …

  1. elsergiovolador Silver badge

    Problem and reality

    The biggest problem is that these companies don't pay the same taxes as small and medium businesses.

    This gives the biggest competitive advantage on the market over smaller players (which they rapidly drop off).

    It seems like there are going to be multiple bodies stepping on each other toes sending you back and forth, meanwhile the giants will continue with their practices.

    What this will achieve will be the chilling effect for small business being paralysed be regulatory requirements, and we all know the government is strong towards the small and weak towards the giants.

  2. sanmigueelbeer Silver badge

    I will believe it when I see it

    if they're found to be in serious breach of new regulations

    First off, the regulators will need proof of "serious breach" was conducted. But if it was a "minor breach" everyone is fine-and-dandy? There could be an army of lawyers who can easily negotiate a "serious breach" down to a misdemeanor without jumping out of bed.

    Next, if I was to use the past penalties handed by the ICO. "fines of up to 10 per cent" is not really much.

    Finally, handing out fines is one thing. Wake me up when news of fines collected have been publicly made available.

    These "regulations" are more there to protect big business from getting in trouble.

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