back to article Engineers' Laurel and Hardy moment caused British Airways 787 to take an accidental knee

A British Airways Boeing 787's landing gear collapsed during a botched test after a short mechanic asked a taller co-worker to insert a lock-out pin into a hole he couldn't reach – only for the second mechanic to put it in the wrong place. The Laurel and Hardy-style failure was detailed in a bulletin from Britain's Air …

  1. Zenubi
  2. Andy Non Silver badge
    Coat

    The engineer's careers

    will take a nose dive.

    1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

      Re: The engineer's careers

      The engineer's careers will take a nose dive.

      Maybe, but on the other hand it's a good bet that they would never make that mistake again.

      1. Aus Tech

        Re: The engineer's careers

        "Maybe, but on the other hand it's a good bet that they would never make that mistake again."

        Maybe, but it depends on how dumb they are. As they (whoever they are) say: "Stupid is as stupid does".

      2. Unoriginal Handle

        Re: The engineer's careers

        They may not, but it's happened at least twice ( US, 2018, from the report ) so two sets of engineers...

        Others may make the same mistake in the future if the little plastic insert isn't fitted by the date required by the AD.

    2. Zenubi

      Re: The engineer's careers

      Very probably - of course the real fail point resides with whoever did not get around to complying with the 3 year old safety directive.

      1. idiot taxpayer here again

        Re: The engineer's careers

        Maybe it's just me, but if I asked someone to do something for me and they weren't sure about doing it properly, I would have watched them do it, or at the very least checked after they had done it. Though as Zenubi said, it should not have been possible to do it wrong in the first place

        1. Danny 2 Silver badge

          Re: The engineer's careers

          "I would have watched them do it, or at the very least checked after they had done it."

          They were too short to do it, so too short to check. I don't want to say anything politically incorrect, but short people are a constant hazard - there is a reason we don't let five year olds drive on motorways.

          In the 1970s we used to make short people wear platform shoes to avoid industrial accidents.

          1. Pascal Monett Silver badge
            Thumb Down

            Short is not equal to young. We don't let five year olds drive because they're not mature enough to handle driving, not because they can't reach the pedals. Short adults are very capable of driving.

            Additionally, short people have eyes that generally work. He could very well have controlled that the pin was placed in the right socket.

            He didn't.

            P.S. : why is Danny 2's post no longer open to votes ? What is the reason of this special treatment ?

            1. Sorry that handle is already taken. Silver badge

              P.S. : why is Danny 2's post no longer open to votes ? What is the reason of this special treatment ?
              That's weird, I have never seen that

            2. PTW
              FAIL

              There's a post by an AC on another of today's stories that's missing the voting buttons completely. El Reg is going TITSUP

              1. JudeK (Written by Reg staff)

                Hi good morning,

                Jude from The Reg here.

                It would really help us if you could let us know which story has an AC with no upvote button on it so we can fix it.

                Regards,

                TITSUP* in the UK

                *Try Imploring Techies to Support Understanding of Problems

                1. quxinot

                  Jude, it's the story about the Google exec and his views on Jews. AC comment pretty far down the comments.

                  1. JudeK (Written by Reg staff)
                2. PTW
                  Pint

                  Sorry Jude, I was going to go back and search but I had the tap on the shoulder to actually go and do some work, pfft, the temerity of it!! And thanks @quxinot. Have a beer on me, both.

                  1. JudeK (Written by Reg staff)

                    Thanks both - that's really useful. You should now be able to up- and downvote everywhere where Register comments are available.

                    Cheers

                    Jude

                3. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
                  Pint

                  TITSUP

                  Totally Impeded To Submit Up\downvotes Properly.

                4. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

                  It's worth noting that links in the bottom left of the screen don't work unless you scroll the page up a bit.

                  It's probably related to the invisible banner that temporarily appears after voting. Although it's not visible, it's still there in terms of what you are trying to click on.

            3. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Seems to be working now - added downvote

            4. Danny 2 Silver badge

              @Pascal

              Like Randy Newman singing 'Short People', I was joking. And I assumed it was such an obvious joke that I didn't have to state it explicitly. I am fully aware the reason five year olds can't drive isn't a height restriction. And though you didn't pick up on this, we didn't make short people wear platform shoes in the 1970s. That was purely voluntary.

              [For the record it was the article that blamed the accident on the engineer being short, I just picked it up and ran with it - like you would do with a short person]

              1. ian 22

                Re: @Pascal

                When I read your comment, I immediately thought of R. Newman's song. However there may be those who are unaware of it.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: The engineer's careers

            too short/too tall problems are common across the world because onesize doesn't fit all is cheaper than tailoring

          3. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: The engineer's careers

            I'm 6'2", and have found both advantages and disadvantages to my height. For the latter, consider my first job, running an amusement park ride. Our "office" was an enclosed space under the landing of a fire escape stairwell. My rather short supervisor had no difficulty dashing in and out, but the steel beam at forehead height for me was rather painful, and nearly induced unconsciousness on one occasion when I was in too big a hurry to pay attention.

            1. DiViDeD Silver badge

              Re: The engineer's careers

              I have a friend who is 195cm ( and a bit, as she keeps telling me) who has lost count of the number of street signs, overhanging branches and other hazards she's faceplanted simply because, when you're walking along the street with shorter friends, you're generally looking down at them and relying on their movements to alert you to headbang hazrds, and they don't, because to them there is no hazard.

        2. Adelio Silver badge

          Re: The engineer's careers

          put labels by each point describing what they are for!

          1. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge

            Re: The engineer's careers

            Plus 1

            (el reg won't allow me to put +1)

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: The engineer's careers

            Make the holes different shapes, so only the correct thing will go in them ...

            1. RogerT

              Re: The engineer's careers

              Excellent idea. Most children have already been on the training course:-

              https://mathematics-at-school.com/images/stories/virtuemart/product/testimg_5de7deaec44c9.jpg

            2. DialTone

              Re: The engineer's careers

              Yes - making things different shapes will solve the problem for sure! I mean, it could, but then again...

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baY3SaIhfl0

              Enjoy!

            3. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: The engineer's careers

              No, making the holes different shapes just makes it slightly more difficult for the incorrect item to be inserted... it just needs an idiot with a larger 'persuader'

      2. Jon 37 Silver badge

        Re: The engineer's careers

        I agree. But in the interests of accuracy, this isn't (quite) a "3 year old safety directive".

        The Safety Bulletin from Boeing was 12 March 2019, so 2 and a quarter years old.

        The Airworthiness Directive from the FAA, the regulator who has authority over Boeing, was 16 January 2020, so 1 and a half years old.

        The FAA obviously didn't think it was urgent, they gave everyone 3 years to comply. And that time hasn't run out yet.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: The engineer's careers

          Boss: how long will it take to fit the mod?

          Techie: less than half hour

          Boss: but they need it urgently... schedule it for next time

          repeat as necessary or until disaster, whichever comes first

    3. Potty Professor
      Flame

      Re: The engineer's careers

      They weren't "Engineers" to start with, at most they were Technicians.

      1. NXM

        Re: The engineer's careers

        Welcome to every IET (formerly IEE) letters page for the last 50 years

    4. Plest Bronze badge
      Pint

      Re: The engineer's careers

      Joking aside, how many here have never done something utterly stupid BUT learned a lot of valuable lessons from it?

      Yeah it was bloody stupid, they should have checked or got someone to check but mistakes happen. So long as no one was hurt and it wasn't mindless incompetance, a slap on the wrist and put under supervision for a month should be enough.

      Cock-ups is why IT gets better or should, we're human, we do some stupid things when we're not concentrating but doesn't mean we're idiots, just human.

    5. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The engineer's careers

      You could say that they really let the pilots down.

  3. wsm

    Boeing-ing-ing

    As if the name Boeing didn't have enough troubles. Now it could be coined as a new term for any aviation mishap. Maybe something like, "I Boeinged that one!"

    1. Blofeld's Cat Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Boeing-ing-ing

      I always assumed "Boeing" was the sound made by a part of the aircraft hitting the ground.

      1. Pascal Monett Silver badge
        Coat

        I would assume that it would generally be "crunch", or, in the worst of cases, "boom".

      2. Anonymous Coward
      3. Velv
        Joke

        Re: Boeing-ing-ing

        Broken

        Off

        Engines

        In

        Numerous

        Gardens

        1. Potty Professor
          Mushroom

          Re: Boeing-ing-ing

          Reminds me of when I was a small child, living in Southend. My sister and I were playing in the garden when an extremely loud screaming noise, followed by a series of bangs and crashing noises, scared the shit out of us, I darted through the french windows into the dining room, and my sister ran into the kitchen. The frightening sounds were made by an English Electric Lightning crashing in the next road over (coincidentally named Electric Avenue), and various parts being liberally distributed over the neighbourhood. One of the jet engines went in through the roof of a house about three doors down from us, crashed through the bedroom, and ended up crushing the dining table flat. I was taken to see the crash site, where the intake nosecone of the fuselage was standing vertically, embedded in the pavement, with an apparently undamaged tree projecting out through it. The RAF were in attendance with a low loader, and they loaded all the bits they could find onto it before taking it away.

  4. Eclectic Man Silver badge
    Facepalm

    BAe 125 Executive Jet

    BAe has form. In the late 1970's and on, the BAe 125 executive jet had the 'feature' that if the nose gear was not locked and the engines turned on powering the hydraulics, the nose gear would retract. This was particularly embarrassing when a Middle Eastern 'potentate' arrived to take possession of his flight of 3 BAe 125 aircraft, and they all 'bowed' as soon as the engines were powered up. There was a mandatory modification to ensure the nose gear stayed in place after that incident.

    From the photo, it looks like the leading edges of the Roots-Royce engines impacted the tarmac, so maybe not just the nose cone will need replacing. Very expensive if any of the fan blades are damaged, let's hope not.

    BAe 125 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Aerospace_125

    1. JDPower666

      Re: BAe 125 Executive Jet

      Didn't read the article then?

      1. Eclectic Man Silver badge
        Facepalm

        Re: BAe 125 Executive Jet

        Apologies, it should have read "BAe has form too."

        Also "Rolls-Royce".

  5. This post has been deleted by its author

    1. Steve K Silver badge

      Freight

      It was operating as a freight flight as per the article…

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Freight

        Now now we can't expect people to read the article before commenting That would imply common sense and we know that doesn't exist.

        1. A.P. Veening Silver badge

          Re: Freight

          Now now we can't expect people to read the article before commenting That would imply common sense and we know that doesn't exist.

          It does exist, but it isn't common.

          "The problem with common sense is that sense never ain't common" - Lazarus Long

    2. This post has been deleted by its author

    3. hittitezombie

      RTFA: "The 787, G-ZBJB, was scheduled to operate a cargo flight on 18 June."...

  6. TRT Silver badge

    I shall avoid the temptation

    To comment about sticking things into the wrong hole.

  7. Paul Hovnanian Silver badge

    This isn't ...

    ... the joke about the golfer in Japan, is it?

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Take an accidental knee

    When did we stop saying "kneel"?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Take an accidental knee

      When a bunch of racists decided that everyone should kowtow to their political demands regardless of relevance to local needs and issues.

      1. Yes Me Silver badge

        Re: Take an accidental knee

        I'm sure we don't say kowtow any more.

        1. Anonymous Coward Silver badge
          Devil

          Re: Take an accidental knee

          That's right; we uses horses for towing. Kows are for consumption only.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: When did we stop saying "kneel"?

      As far as the headline goes, I imagine it would be something along the lines of: when it's more amusing to make a glancing reference to some interesting feature of contemporary culture.

      1. matjaggard

        Re: When did we stop saying "kneel"?

        They're quite different. I'm not taking an anti-racist stance when I kneel to sort my washing but I am if I take the knee.

        1. Trixr

          Re: When did we stop saying "kneel"?

          ...and the latter is exactly what the headline is alluding to, in its cutesy phrasing

    3. lglethal Silver badge
      Trollface

      Re: Take an accidental knee

      Well only one leg went down so that's taking a knee, isnt it? If two legs went down that would be kneeling. And I suppose if all 3 went down we'd call it a belly flop.

      Glad to clear that up for you... :P

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Take an accidental knee

        "Well only one leg went down so that's taking a knee, isnt it? "

        Not if you are being dubbed for a knighthood by HRH.

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Take an accidental knee

      I'd prefer any plane I fly in not to kneel (or take a knee), accidental or otherwise!

      1. alisonken1

        Re: Take an accidental knee

        Actually, the F14 did have to kneel before a cat shot off the carrier:

        https://forums.eagle.ru/topic/202491-carrier-launch-procedure/

        (step 2 after lining up with the cat)

  9. Stratman

    I'm quite surprised there aren't automatic lockouts to prevent this very thing.

    1. Jon 37 Silver badge

      There are automatic lockouts to prevent the *pilot* from raising the landing gear on the ground. Probably including weight-on-wheels sensors, and/or checks on altitude and airspeed. However, as part of the maintenance, the *engineers* presumably disabled those safety systems. They're supposed to install the locking pins, so it's physically impossible for the wheel to move, before doing that.

      Unfortunately, ground maintenance crews need to do a lot of things that you wouldn't want to be done in normal flight, as a normal part of their repair / diagnosis / maintenance work. So they have the ability to override the system, and safety is supposed to be assured by them following the procedures.

    2. Andre Carneiro

      Yes, I could swear there are squat switches that prevent accidental landing gear retraction whilst on ground.

      Presumably whatever system reset they were doing must have circumvented that fail safe, hence the requirement to insert the downlock pin.

      1. J.G.Harston Silver badge

        If you read the article, as part of the maintainance they had to actuate the landing gear retraction mechanism to cycle the operating fluids through the system, but without it actually retracting the landing gear. That's what the locking pin was supposed to be there for, so they could deliberately operate the "retract landing gear" controls without the landing gear retracting.

        Dunno much about cars, but maybe like pressing the accelerator to make the engine speed up to clear muck out of the system, but with the brakes on so the car doesn't actually move and smash through the back of the garage.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Many moons ago, as an air cadet, I remember being allowed to spend time in the maintenance hanger. Whilst some were there happy polishing canopies, I got talking to one of the guys there an asked if I could help. He was working on the landing gear of a Jet Provost.

      Whatever it was he was doing (I can't remember now), he was telling me about the locking mechanism on the gear - immediately followed by a 'thunk' as it locked. So I spent the next 5 minutes led on my back kicking the crap out of this oleo leg while he tried to release the lock so he could continue with the job.

      RAF Linton-on-Ouse, back in the mid '80s. Fun times before I seriously had to find a job....

  10. SImon Hobson Silver badge

    Lucky there weren't injuries. IIRC in a previous incident of that sort, the sudden change in attitude meant that a pallet rolled forward and caused significant injuries to the loadmaster.

  11. Timbo Bronze badge

    Seems to me a few errors were made...

    1) So this happened on 18th June? - one assumes 2021....and given that most aeroplanes have been in mothballs for some time, why had the directive to sort out this issue not been done already? The mechanics would surely have had great opportunities to fix many of the relevant planes as a) all the planes were parked up in large numbers around the country, not going anywhere and b) there were no time pressures to get the planes modified quickly.

    2) I assume BOTH mechanics were trained to do the work? If so, was this a simple mistake by one mechanic who clearly had not read the guidance on how to fit the crucial lockdown pin....or maybe the short mechanic was in charge in which case why did he not "oversee" (sic) what the tall mechanic did, by getting a ladder to check it? The cost implications of getting it wrong are pretty huge, so someone must take responsibility for it?

    1. TRT Silver badge

      Re: Seems to me a few errors were made...

      Cargo aircraft wasn't it?

    2. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Seems to me a few errors were made...

      Is it wrong I read that as BOFH engineers.

  12. chrisw67

    > So this happened on 18th June? - one assumes 2021...

    No assumption required. It is in the report.

    > and given that most aeroplanes have been in mothballs for some time, why had the directive to sort out this issue not been done already?

    Plainly, this aircraft was not in mothballs. Operating aircraft fleets are serviced to a schedule that is combination of manufacturer's recommendations, regulatory requirements, and operational requirements. Non-urgent modifications will be done when the aircraft is otherwise out-of-service for maintenance. The base maintenance check period for a 787 is around 36 months IIRC (heavy maintenance around 12 years). If, for example, this aircraft was finishing servicing at the time of the directive, then you could reasonably expect it will not be there again for a couple of years.

    Aircraft in mothballs will only have the minimum work done to preserve their ability to return to service. They are generally neither in a fully functional state (e.g. fluids drained or replaced with storage versions) nor at a substantial company maintenance facility (e.g. in the Mohave desert [1] or central Australia[2]). Consequently, the necessary systems to perform this particular nose gear installation may not be present, even if the airline wanted to spend money on aircraft it may never fly again (an aircraft not flying is a money pit, not just lost revenue).

    [1] https://goo.gl/maps/8vRpLwWki9AQAAF39

    [2] https://www.escape.com.au/news/incredible-images-of-plane-graveyard-near-alice-springs/news-story/186572ec9da57bb6e6248f915effe876

  13. Captain TickTock
    Boffin

    Is there some special reason...

    ..why a ladder couldn't have been used...?

    1. Steve K Silver badge

      Re: Is there some special reason...

      They are taking steps to ensure it doesn't happen again

      1. Jimmy2Cows Silver badge
        Coat

        Re: Is there some special reason...

        Someone already took steps. Which is why they couldn't find a ladder.

        Badum tish.

        1. David 132 Silver badge
          Happy

          Re: Is there some special reason...

          Random humour I saw on Reddit recently, which tickled my sense of the absurd:

          "Shut up step-ladder! You're not my real ladder!"

    2. PerlyKing Silver badge

      Re: Is there some special reason...

      Human nature. If you need something from a high shelf and there's a taller person next to you, do you follow the regulations to the letter and go and get a step ladder (or a cherry picker, picking up the Cabin Pressure theme again ;-) or just ask your mate to reach it down? Unfortunately in this case the downside was a bit worse than getting the wrong breakfast cereal.

      1. Paul Hovnanian Silver badge

        Re: Is there some special reason...

        "If you need something from a high shelf and there's a taller person next to you,"

        I watch her to see if she has fetched the cookie jar I wanted. And not the rat poison. (Tall wife.)

      2. Major N
        Coat

        Re: Is there some special reason...

        In thought the downside in this case was the nose end...

    3. Potemkine! Silver badge

      Re: Is there some special reason...

      Well, if the ladder has a certain number of steps, you need a certification to use it. If you haven't the right training, you aren't allowed to use it.

  14. Sven Coenye
    Coat

    Well, here's another nice mess you gotten me into!

    Well, I couldn't help it...

    1. Sceptic Tank
      Headmaster

      Re: Well, here's another nice mess you gotten me into!

      Another fine mess.

      1. TRT Silver badge

        Re: Well, here's another nice mess you gotten me into!

        Was the inflight meal in laughing gravy?

      2. Sven Coenye
        Headmaster

        That was the title of a movie but Hardy's line was "nice mess"

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3qcj2MzPYc

  15. JDPower666
    Trollface

    The engineers involved were suspended.

    ...and immediately snapped up by Boeing.

  16. Neil Barnes Silver badge
    FAIL

    Hang on a moment...

    The maintenance guys are copping the blame here - with some justification - but the fault goes all the way back to the initial design.

    What idiot thought it might be a good idea to have a pin-sized hole immediately adjacent to the safety critical hole that the pin *should* have gone into? There is no way that that pin should have been able to fit into anything other than the lockout place it was intended to to go.

    This isn't a doh moment. This is a basic design flaw, an engineering review flaw, and oversight flaw and a management flaw. Someone signed off on that design and they never should have.

    1. Jimmy2Cows Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Hang on a moment...

      Smells like Boeing beancounters in action. Again.

      "Logic" (I use the term generously) that perhaps went something like this: Why have the cost of machining two differently shaped holes and corresponding differently shaped pins, when a single hole and pin shape will suffice?

      Classic failure to understand the vital reason for the differences. Just another line item to be cut.

      1. Neil Barnes Silver badge

        Re: Hang on a moment...

        Round pins, square holes...

    2. Trixr

      Re: Hang on a moment...

      Yup, UI design is not just about computer interfaces.

      Without prior knowledge, I would have done exactly the same thing, because t'wrong 'ole has that circle around it making it look even more like a target.

      I think it's because it looks like a pivoting part, so it's a surface phlange for the internal pivot, but that very plain hole adjacent does not look functional at all.

      So the surface "decoration" should indeed look different and preferably, the holes have different dimensions and/or shapes to prevent accidents happening.

      So many engineering accidents have happened due to ambiguous controls, and planes downed multiple times. You think that designers would have a better handle on this kind of thing by now.

  17. matjaggard

    Snipe at Apple

    I love how often The Register likes to take a snipe at Apple - and rightly so.

    They want to improve privacy, which if I'm honest is not a bad thing, but the motivation is not good - in-app adverts are in direct competition with their app store income.

  18. Jim Whitaker
    FAIL

    Murphy's Law revisited

    Surely this is just a variant of Murphy's Law - If it is possible for something to be fitted the wrong way round, it will be.

    1. Old69

      Re: Murphy's Law revisited

      with the Sod's Law rider "at the worst possible moment".

      1. A.P. Veening Silver badge

        Re: Murphy's Law revisited

        with the Sod's Law rider "at the worst possible moment".

        The worst possible moment would have been while loading critical patients for an emergency medical evacuation flight.

        NB: Feel free to post even worse possible moments.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Murphy's Law revisited

          How about 'best' possible moments.

          Like a plane full of PHBs, expensive wine glasses in hand, about to swan off on some jaunt somewhere while the workers stay working their backsides off.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Murphy's Law revisited

      "Murphy Was An Optimist"

    3. Swarthy Silver badge
      Headmaster

      Re: Murphy's Law revisited

      Edward Murphy (the actual person) was exactly talking about this when he stated his eponymous law, espousing "Defensive Design".

  19. Wolfclaw
    Facepalm

    Maybe the engineer is woke and demanded he took a knee before he worked on it and his mate thought he said for the aircraft to take the knee or nose in this case.

  20. bobbear

    Reminds me of the Monsters v. Aliens 'buttons' design:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1CxlyMoFRs

    When I was involved in life-critical safety & protection systems, a major mantra was "If something can possibly happen, it eventually will" and thus the aim was to spot bad things that could possibly happen in order to make them impossible, which is where abilities such as foresight, deductive reasoning and basic intelligence play a major part. Unfortunately, such qualities seem to be in short supply these days. I blame leaded petrol...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      IIRC a nuclear reactor control panel had two adjacent identical levers . One for orderly shut-down - one for immediate shut-down. The operators attached differing beer pump knobs to distinguish them.

      Murphy's Law is always a potential error - but the crunch comes with the Sod's Law rider "at the worst possible moment".

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "Unfortunately, such qualities seem to be in short supply these days."

      It is a recurring factor for each generation. When people don't know or understand the underlying constraints of the technology they use - then they may inadvertently breach them. Our modern society's technology is a Tower of Babel built on foundations of shifting sand.

      Donald Rumsfeld was mocked for his statement about the factors of "unknown unknowns" that can affect an outcome.

      British tank designers made a new design with vertical sides - when it was already known that sloping sides gave some protection against enemy projectiles.

      The Comet jet suffered catastrophic metal fatigue cracks at the corners of its originally square windows. Yet that was not many years after Liberty ships had been diagnosed as sinking owing to fatigue cracks at the sharp corners of cargo hatches.

  21. Oh Matron!

    Where's Zod?

    Because everyone knows that you kneel before Zod

  22. Dabooka Silver badge

    I like the proposed solution in the US ASRS report

    Fill the incorrect hole full of sealant and draw a red circle around the proper hole.

    Bodge it at it's best.

  23. Ian Johnston Silver badge

    Are we sure this was a Boeing and not a Rutland Reindeer?

  24. Alan Brown Silver badge

    Murphy's law

    The original one

    "If an aircraft part can be fitted two ways around, and one of those is the wrong way around, somebody will do it"

    It then goes on to elaborate that you can write as much documentation as you want, it _will_ still happen

    (The same applies if there are 2 identical looking holes to put pins in and one is the wrong one, diesel in petrol tanks, gravity sensors(*), etc)

    (*) In that particular instance, the sensor was keyed to prevent being installed upside down but a Roscosomos engineer managed to make it fit anyway.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022