back to article Realizing this is getting out of hand, Coq mulls new name for programming language

After three decades, Coq, a theorem-proving programming language developed by researchers in France, is being fitted for a new name because it has become impossible to ignore that it sounds like bawdy English slang. Once referred to as CoC, short for Calculus of Constructions, the programming language became Coq when work on …

  1. MJB7

    There are two hard problems in Computer Science

    - Cache invalidation

    - Naming things

    - Off by one errors.

    Jokes aside, naming things _is_ hard, and it's important too.

    1. unimaginative
      Mushroom

      Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

      Harder one, not just in computer science.

      Getting people to grow up.

      I am also fed up of American norms being imposed on the entire IT world.

      To me when I grew up the main association of the word master was a male school teacher, but American culture must always trump everyone elses. Cultural imperialism.

      Coq is a French language, why should they conform to American norms.

      Another language had its name changed from Nimrod to Nim because illeterate Americans did not understand that Bugs Bunny was being sarcastic when he reffered to Elmer Fudd as Nimrod - its a biblical reference to a "mighty hunter".

      Can the rest of us stick to our own cultural norms please?

      1. AndrueC Silver badge
        Happy

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        Coq is a French language, why should they conform to American norms.

        They don't have to. But it's a bit like free speech. You can say what you want but you have to accept the consequences. They appear to have decided that it's impeding usage. C'est la vie :)

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          The problem with that is there are no consequences until they are created.

        2. John R. Macdonald

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          A French Foreign Legion unit changed their official name because the acronym made their NATO counterparts snicker. The unit used to be called "Commandos de Recherche et Action en Profondeur".

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            So immature grunts in the world's armed forces are setting the new standard for language? Makes sense, us English speakers are still speaking a weird amalgam of Celtic, Latin, Ænglisc ("Old English"), Saxon, Norse and French thanks to similar activity.

            Yes, I know, there are many other loan-words from many other languages in English.

          2. bombastic bob Silver badge
            Coat

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            They must have been well known for their

            Super High Intensity Training

          3. James Hughes 1

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            Still better than "Commander of United Nations Taskforce". (which was a real thing in Gibraltar I think)

            1. eldakka

              Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

              > Still better than "Commander of United Nations Taskforce". (which was a real thing in Gibraltar I think)

              In the late 80's/early 90's in Australia, there was a rash of elevating Colleges of Advanced Educations into Universities. One such was the CCAE - Canberra College of Advanced Education, but it became a University, variously called Canberra University or University of Canberra (UC). This resulted in the netball team for what was previously the CCAE becoming, very briefly, the Canberra University Netall Team, before being mysteriously renamed the University of Canberra Netball Team.

        3. TheMeerkat

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          “You can say what you want but you have to accept the consequences”

          This is a direct quote from an explanation given by Communist propaganda for why people criticising Communist Party rules were punished.

          The woke are pro-dictatorship.

          1. FIA Silver badge

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            “You can say what you want but you have to accept the consequences”

            This is a direct quote from an explanation given by Communist propaganda for why people criticising Communist Party rules were punished.

            Do you have a link for that direct quote? Which communist party? What country? (Google was unhelpful; as increasingly is the case).

            Also, as an idea, self responsibility isn't really a 'dictatorship' only thing is it? (It's also not very 'communist' either).

            The woke are pro-dictatorship.

            I mean... erm... that's a bit of a stretch isn't it? "Lets rename this thing to stop people focusing on it's unfortunate translation and consider it's merits instead" is a little far away from "Let's invade Poland".

            1. James Hughes 1

              Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

              Actually not that far of a stretch. Certain areas are dictating what people can and cannot say. Do what they want or get crucified on the cross of social media.

              It's not just leaders who can be dictators.

            2. Cliffwilliams44 Silver badge

              Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

              It's basically another iteration of:

              "If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear!"

          2. prandeamus

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            You're going from a very specific instance of Communist party rules (When? Where? What country? What flavour of communism?) Then you quietly equate woke with communist. And then conclude that woke=dictatorship/

            Any logician would rip the shit out of that argument. Try harder. It's literally no different from the very old example of saying FIRE! in a crowded theatre. You can say it, but you are accountable (positively) if you save lives, and accountable (negatively) if you said a stupid think in a public place just for the lols and someone gets hurt.

            Woke is an irrelevance here. Go back to the Telegraph.

          3. TheWeetabix

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            So is "Because we said so", but that doesn't make every parent ever a communist.

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        "I am also fed up of American norms being imposed on the entire IT world."

        Like it or not, while the American dialect of the English Language (whatever that means!) is not by any stretch of the imagination the de jure language of TehIntraWebTubes, it is, however, the de facto lingua franca of The Internet's technical world. For the moment, anyway. This is subject to change, eventually. It's inevitable.

        "changed from Nimrod to Nim because illeterate Americans did not understand that Bugs Bunny was being sarcastic"

        This particular "illeterate" American understood the joke. However, quite a few children grew up thinking the term was a pejorative as it was the first place and context they had seen the word used. This is hardly uncommon, see Dunce (from Duns Scotus). But then I'll bet you're a regular Einstein and won't understand the point of this paragraph ...

        "Can the rest of us stick to our own cultural norms please?"

        Whose cultural norms do you propose "the rest of us" use, Kemosabe?

        1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          Also the reason the treasonous colonials use faucet instead of cock for a tap

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            The word "faucet" (then a type of beer tap) was first used in England in around 1400, us traitorous colonials brought it with us a trifle later. Naturally, the English stole the word from the French.

            1. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

              Re: "faucet"

              The problem with the French naming is that people do, and the washers need replacing more often.

              1. jake Silver badge

                Re: "faucet"

                That would depend entirely on how atrocious your accent is.

                Hint: There is no R in faucet.

                1. VulcanV5

                  Re: "faucet"

                  Until encountering this enlightening thread, I hadn't realized how insulting is 'stopcock'. Most often when we need to call in a plumber he tells my wife to stop the cock, presumably because he's filled with envy and not a little malice.. His question is posed in such a way as to humiliate me -- do you know where your cock-that-needs-stopping actually is -- the possessive in this case attributed to her, never to me.

            2. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

              Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

              But cock was the common use, Noah Webster and others deliberately went looking for non-naughty terms to keep American sensibilities decent

              1. jake Silver badge

                Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

                Nice try, but the term was already in common usage before Webster got his mitts on it.

      3. Sam Adams the Dog

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        You type "illeterate" and then refer to illiterate Americans?

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          since you obviously think illiterate means making typos or spelling mistakes, I suggest you might want to look up what illiterate means in the dictionary before you dig yourself a big hole.

      4. NoneSuch Silver badge
        Coat

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        I presumed James May had established a technology company.

        1. spireite Silver badge

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          That'd be a Coq au Van

      5. oiseau
        WTF?

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        Getting people to grow up.

        Indeed ...

        +1

        If for some people, the programing language's name (or the associations it conjures up in their imagination/brains) "deters community participation", then so be it.

        Maybe that's just the type of dicks you don't need participating in your community.

        And yes, pun intended. 8^P

        Best,

        A.

        1. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          The perils of being PC, versus the perils of not being PC, versus the perils of being labeled PC.

          So, for example, a woman might have no problem with using the Coq programming language. Rather, she has a problem with all the dicks around her who won't stop sniggering about it. Let's just be clear that when she complains (or leaves), who actually is the one being the dick. Calling the woman the dick is just being dick squared.

          As for the English vs French angle, I have no doubt some of the sniggerers are French. As a male who speaks both English and French, I have heard plenty of sniggering in both languages. I have also done it myself, but these days only in private.

      6. Anonymous Coward
        Boffin

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        No one is imposing anything. They're just trying to make their name a bit less joke-friendly and avoid it being misunderstood in voice communications. There's a reason names today tend to be made-up words.

        As an American, I have no problem telling someone that I like coq au vin but I would be hesitant to talk about Coq in a professional setting.

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          As a cook, I'm pretty certain you've never actually eaten coq au vin. (I've got a cantankerous old rooster I'm allowing to live just a little longer in order to make this treat for my birthday ... ).

          As a Professional, I question your professionalism if you have issues using technical terms in a technical setting. Shirley knowing how and when to use technical terms properly is one of the very definitions of being a Professional?

          1. Ciaran McHale

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            > Shirley knowing how and when to use technical terms properly is one of the very definitions of being a Professional

            My Google search failed to find that definition in an online dictionary. And don't call me Shirley.

      7. gandalfcn Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        "Can the rest of us stick to our own cultural norms please?" Not according to mose Septics, and especially the Trumpstan ones.

        I do get a giggle when they don't see the funny side of someone called minge, or Pence Trump, they're all a bit Hyacinth Bucket

      8. Dave314159ggggdffsdds Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        "To me when I grew up the main association of the word master was a male school teacher"

        Which is because the UK school system was deliberately designed to instill much the same sense of a disciplinary hierarchy based on race and social position.

        The British were less keen on slaves than the US - to put it mildly - but still had very similar ideas on the 'just' treatment of 'natives'.

        It isn't just America which finds those words deeply offensive these days. Former British-colonies often have absolutely terrible customer service because the locals find 'customer service' too reminiscent of 'servility'. Similarly, any reference to 'master' except in very specific contexts.

        1. nijam Silver badge

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          > ... the UK school system was deliberately designed to instill much the same sense of a disciplinary hierarchy...

          True.

          > ...based on race and social position.

          False. It was based entirely on teachers being in charge in the classroom.

          1. Dave314159ggggdffsdds Silver badge

            Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

            "False. It was based entirely on teachers being in charge in the classroom."

            That simply isn't true. There is explicit documentary evidence that there was a _deliberate_ decision to instill certain ideas about how to run the world. It is _directly_ related to colonialism.

            1. J.G.Harston Silver badge

              Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

              So how come school masters were around long before colonialism?

              School master comes directly from magister, the person in charge. Which, incidently, is why the US President is occassionally refered to as the Chief Magistrate - the topmost person in charge.

        2. Disgusted Of Tunbridge Wells Silver badge
          Facepalm

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          Your post: see icon.

      9. J.G.Harston Silver badge

        Elmer Fudd as Nimrod

        Wow, that's something that's completely passed me by in five decades of culture. When watching Bugs I'd always heard it as refering to Nimrod The Hunter, we have battleships named Nimrod, there's the Nimrod music, etc.

      10. The Indomitable Gall

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        I would agree, but then again the language is called "Calculus of constructions" and not "Calculus des constructions". If the name is basically English, you really have to consider the other things about Anglophone culture.

        Et oui: mon français est superbe ; ainsi j’ai bien sûr le droit de dire ce que je viens d‘écrire.

    2. TeeCee Gold badge
      Meh

      Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

      I just find it hysterically ironic that it's being renamed purely because there are so many people who just have to be a dick.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        The irony of the precious little dicks being offended forcing a name change ... wait, that's not irony. That's just plain sad.

      2. Disgusted Of Tunbridge Wells Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        What I find bizarre about it is that it's so obvious that it isn't funny.

        So unless you're working with 10 year olds who are first discovering that form of humour and haven't got bored of it yet, what's the problem?

    3. FIA Silver badge

      Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

      - Handling Money

      - Dealing with time

      - Dealing with names

      1. Androgynous Cupboard Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        I've simply made everything and everyone I know use UTC and milliseconds since the epoch in their daily life.

        I'll admit it wasn't simple, but it seemed easier than the alternative.

    4. Locomotion69

      Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

      No no no

      - Users

      - Those who claim to be an "expert" of some sort

      - Did I mention "users" ?

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

        Those are human issues, not CompSci issues.

        1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

          Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

          >Those are human issues, not CompSci issues.

          Ultimately they are civil engineering issues - if you are the BOFH

    5. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: There are two hard problems in Computer Science

      This similarity has already led to some women turning away from Coq"..

      LOL, someone didn't think about that sentence very well either...

  2. Paul Crawford Silver badge

    Lets face it, there are so many slang words for sex-related parts or activities it would be hard to not come across one. But really looking for names related to a male chicken is always going to end badly, probably by chocking it.

    1. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

      Gah -- you were going to finish with a droll pun-esque joke, but you chocked.

      1. jake Silver badge
        Pint

        The wheels are spinning, but let's put a chock under them and choke a chook for the grill.

        Beer always works well with grilled chicken :-)

    2. veti Silver badge

      Yes, there are a lot of words in a lot of languages to avoid. I believe international trademark lawyers have a helpful database, so it's perfectly possible to avoid them if you're prepared to put the work (and money) into it.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Or, we can just use the language as she is spoke.

        Fuck the landsharks, and their ridiculous fees. Part of the problem, methinks ...

      2. Old69

        "I believe international trademark lawyers have a helpful database"

        "Durex" brand name.

        English condom. Australian sticky tape. Israeli scouring pad.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Luckily, all interchangeable a pinch.

    3. MyffyW Silver badge

      Into a crowded field I would like to push forward Bosoms as the new name. And I've got a wooden ruler ready for anybody who finds that remotely titillating. Now, maintain eye contact please.

      1. Robert Carnegie Silver badge

        I thought the standard of measurement of Bosoms was a pencil.

        How many if us will it take to support your Bosoms?

        1. MyffyW Silver badge

          @Robert-Carnegie

          On the basis of the imperial unit the standard British handful I expect a single well chosen individual would be sufficient to support my Bosoms [proposal].

          As for pencils, these days let's just say "more than one". And remember I am holding a wooden ruler, and I'm not afraid to use it.

      2. zuckzuckgo

        It is always a good idea to keep abreast of accepted naming conventions.

    4. Toni the terrible Bronze badge

      Well, my Ozzy relatives prefers to use the word 'Chook' for chicken or Chooks plural for Hens and Cocks - cant see how that would be a problem, if you want a word to replace Rooster/Cock

      1. Fred Daggy Silver badge
        Headmaster

        Good idea but down vote for the use of "ozzy" for Australians. Ozzy normally refers to a (particular) Brummie. "Aussie", with a hard "ss" sound for Australians.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Always a shame when women turn away from coq.

    1. jake Silver badge

      I'm surprised such a stupid comment has so many upvotes. I thought ElReg commentards were more educated and worldly than that.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        And I'm surprised such an amusing comment has so many downvotes Sigh, where did all the humour go. Can't laugh, you might offend someone.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Its simply quoting the project wiki from the article that said women were turning away from coq. Do you not think female developers are a good thing?

  4. b0llchit Silver badge
    Mushroom

    ...and others getting harassed when they said they were working on Coq

    This says more about those doing the harassing than those who work on Coq. There is no word or sound in any language that cannot be (ab)used to have some other meaning. Trying to please the zealots only results in more problems.

    Or, we can just agree that one word remains: blank. Then we can have meaningful conversations like this:

    Blank blank blank, blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank blank, blank blank blank, blank blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank blank blank blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank blank. Blank, blank blank blank blank blank blank, blank blank blank blank blank blank blank. Blank!

    How many references to reproductive organs did you find in that text? <blank>

    1. Chris G

      @b0llchit

      It says all you need to know about the current members of the Eternally Offended cult.

      They seem to spend their time searching for reasons to be either offended personally or by proxy on the behalf of people they don't know but make the assumption those people would be offended.

      I find those who are easily and constantly offended, to be offensive and I protest!

      1. fedoraman

        The Easily Offended

        They usually hang out on Twitter, I hear

      2. Arthur the cat Silver badge

        It says all you need to know about the current members of the Eternally Offended cult.

        Or as Monty Python had it nearly 50 years ago:

        Dear Sir, I wish to make a complaint. So please put on something of a highly offensive nature.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          "So please put on something of a highly offensive nature."

          Many years ago David Frost had a TV show that possibly introduced the sketch with the Two Ronnies and John Clees making a satirical point about the UK class system.

          Another sketch was equally biting. David Frost was interviewing a "Clean Up TV" activist. The latter said he didn't need to watch a programme - he could determine the offensiveness of its content from the title.

          His rating for the most sexually offensive was for the children's programme "Blue Peter".

        2. bombastic bob Silver badge
          Happy

          more people should watch the old Python series.

          They might learn how to laugh

      3. jake Silver badge

        What is truly offensive are the fuckwits who presume to be offended on the behalf of others. It's getting to the point where nobody can say anything about anything without somebody pretending to get upset about it in somebody else's name. Frankly, I find it grossly offensive that somebody might presume to be offended in my name. Be offended for yourself, by all means, but keep my good name out of your fantasy.

        1. A.P. Veening Silver badge

          What is truly offensive are the fuckwits who presume to be offended on the behalf of others.

          And that one is about as old as speech, the worst (and first) being the fuckwits that get offended by blasphemy (and if that god of them were as omnipotent as he is reputed to be, he could take care of it himself).

    2. Disgusted Of Tunbridge Wells Silver badge

      "Blank blank blank, blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank blank, blank blank blank, blank blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank blank blank blank blank. Blank blank blank blank blank blank. Blank, blank blank blank blank blank blank, blank blank blank blank blank blank blank. Blank!"

      Phwoar! Don't stop now!

    3. John Miles

      Sounds like you are firing blanks to me ;)

      1. b0llchit Silver badge
        Alert

        See, no word or sound is safe from sexual connotations. I rest my case.

      2. jake Silver badge

        Come again?

    4. heyrick Silver badge
      IT Angle

      "Blank blank blank, blank blank."

      I used to work, long ago, at a nursing home where the barely-trained had pretentions, so it wasn't uncommon to hear a sentence like "Staff has asked me to get (something) from Staff because Staff needs it for Staff." I doubt anybody actually knew who the hell was being referred to, but they were "promoted" to Staff Nurse (by the standards of the home, not anything at all related to actual NHS qualifications) and by god were they going to make sure everybody lower on their perceived totem pole (including my mother, a real nurse but didn't let on) was aware of it.

      Me? I was just "the agency".

      No IT angle at all. Just the blank blank blank made me think of this.

    5. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "How many references to reproductive organs did you find in that text?"

      For men who are sterile or whose various ejaculatory glands are dry - the usual term is "firing blanks".

    6. This post has been deleted by its author

  5. Piro Silver badge
    Pint

    Vin

    Since that's the first thing that comes to mind, Coq au vin.

    I don't think there's a programming language called Vin, and who wouldn't want to use a language named after liquid coding inspiration? I can see some confusion might arise visually with "Vim", but only after a few glasses.

    It also keeps the French slant, is memorable and slightly whimsical, just as long as it's pronounced correctly.

    1. b0llchit Silver badge
      Pint

      Re: Vin

      So, you manage to do work on this graph? Can't imagine where on the graph you are when vin and vim become indistinguishable.

    2. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

      au Vin

      I was going to come here to say exactly this (before I read past the advert and started giggling), so take my upvote.

      Well, almost exactly.

      I would have suggested the full suffixual portion: "au Vin" (pronouncing it properly as awVAR+plus a swallowed but distinguishable n). Keeps the link closer to Coq, the "au" makes it clear even to Americans that it's pronounced differently, lets the Parisians still get snotty about cons* mangling French -- everyone wins!

      .

      .

      * "Con" (sing.), "Cons" (pl.): haven 't heard a female anatomy version; only the Stupid/LowClass/Ignoramus/SneerAtTheFool meaning. E.g. the movie Le Diner de Cons.

      1. 42656e4d203239 Silver badge

        Re: au Vin

        >>haven 't heard a female anatomy version;

        fyi....

        Con acquired its vulgar connotation in the 12th century, and became an insult during the 19th. its original meaning of female genitalia is today completely forgotten, except among people who enjoy old books. Still, if the adjective used with the word can strengthen or weaken its meaning, it is important to note that who says it can also modify its strength. Remember Sarkozy’s “casse toi pauvre con”, which was perceived as much more injurious in his mouth than in any other.’

        from here

        espèce de con = (literally) species of idot (or vulva depending on if you are modern of 12thC!) so a better translation could be You Idiot! or You C***! depending on context.

        1. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

          Re: au Vin

          oo ta. I like me some etymological goodness, I do.

          .

          On a related note: the name "mean" for what most people regard as a normal average, comes from the French "moyen" meaning "middle". The original English statistical term was "middle" and the posh language in England then (eg, used in the law courts) was French.

          Ay walla! (A German phrase meaning to have fun in mud)

    3. Arthur the cat Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: Vin

      Since that's the first thing that comes to mind, Coq au vin.

      She was impressed by his offer to feed her Coq au Vin until she saw the Transit.

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: Vin

        Was her name Gloria and was she sick?

        1. Antron Argaiv Silver badge

          Re: Vin

          ...and was it Monday?

          1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

            Re: Vin

            el'reg - come for the dick jokes, stay for the ecclesiastical Latin puns

            1. Paul Herber Silver badge

              Re: Vin

              Commentardes eunt domus.

              1. jake Silver badge

                Re: Vin

                nos sumus in domum

            2. drguyrope

              What about names of people?

              Would the policy on renaming extend to people who have amusing or offensive names in other languages ?

              I once had a colleague whose second name was "Dikshit". And I'm certain much amusement was had at his expense however I don't think anybody would suggest to him that he should change his name to something less offensive in the language which is not his own.

    4. Jason Hindle

      Re: Ahh, knocking off in the WFH era

      Sometimes means going from vim to vin.

      1. Psmo
        Pint

        Re: Ahh, knocking off in the WFH era

        Daily

    5. teknopaul

      Re: Vin

      Coqvin concatenating two words to make a new proper noun as a name for a project is a tried and tested good practice. Naturally check Google for uniqueness if it's a public project.

      I wrote this idea up as sanename.org so I don't forget the rules. Since doing this, naming things has never been a problem for me.

      oh and push to the cache, don't write read-through caches and the invalidation thing is fixed too.

      your welcome.

    6. adam 40 Silver badge
      Paris Hilton

      Re: Vag

      Why not go the whole hog and call it "Coq au Vag"

      That way, both sexes are equally represented, and there can be no complaints from female programmers.

    7. tonique
      Joke

      Re: Vin

      If you were spelling "Enacs" instead of "Emacs", you may not be able to use that editor any more, so "vin" is more desirable.

  6. GrumpenKraut
    Angel

    Just call it

    the one-eyed purple-veined theorem prover. Sorted.

    1. b0llchit Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Just call it

      That would really piss off the poor sods with one eye and a state of chronic oxygen deprivation. Are you making fun of those poor souls?

      yes, yes, my coat...

      1. GrumpenKraut

        Re: Just call it

        My bad, should not have made fun of dear Mr. Trouser Snake (PhD).

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: Just call it

          Shirley that should be Dr. Trouser Snake?

          1. Psmo
            Coat

            Re: Just call it

            Only on weekends. It's annoying to try and keep the stethoscope on.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Bad names

    Just call it "MathProver" or something descriptive. Why do software projects need to have silly titles? Just name things based on what they do... Much less likely to pick something that sounds like something else.

    1. Richard 12 Silver badge

      Re: Bad names

      They need a silly name so they can be trademarked and Googled.

      Eg Vulkan is called that entirely to prevent the problem OpenGL has, where almost all the top hits were showing how to use long deprecated parts of the API.

      Sadly some marketeers still don't understand this and insist on inserting punctuation to make it different, thus making the product trademarkable, but impossible to Google as it coerces all punctuation to a space.

    2. A Non e-mouse Silver badge
      Flame

      Re: Bad names

      Just call it "MathProver" or something descriptive

      Because English isn't the only language used on this planet and the authors of the project are French speakers where coq doesn't have the connotations the word has in the English language.

      1. snowpages

        Re: Bad names

        ..and even on this side of the pond we might oblect to "Math" as we all know it should be "Maths"...

        1. EricB123 Bronze badge

          Re: Bad names

          When I moved from America a to SE Asia, I thought for months everybody was bad at typing the word "math". It took years to get used to this new, strange spelling.

      2. Field Marshal Von Krakenfart
        Headmaster

        Re: Bad names

        How about "Le MathProver" then?

    3. iron Silver badge

      Re: Bad names

      Because Mathematics is plural.

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: Bad names

        And if you only know one tiny bit of it you use the singular

    4. Ace2 Silver badge

      Re: Bad names

      Because if you call your extremely awesome tool “screen” no one will ever be able to find any info on it on the web?

      1. Arthur the cat Silver badge

        Re: Bad names

        I suspect that if you search for "extremely awesome tool" most search engines will find rather a lot of information.

  8. jake Silver badge

    Just call it ...

    ... Coq. It's what it's always going to be called anyway.

    Treat anyone who insists on having a fit of giggles when discussing it as the children that they are, and invite them to return to the conversation after they grow up.

    Likewise, also treat anyone who is offended by the name as children. It's a fucking programming language, you pampered, overly protected little precious babies.

    It's all in the context ... If you are talking about a programming language, what kind of dirty minded twit automatically assumes it has to do with a penis? Why should anyone using said language change their behavio(u)r just to keep these very few and far between hand-wringers and namby-pambys happy?

    1. Headley_Grange Silver badge

      Re: Just call it ...

      Have you ever met any engineers? Or, indeed, any people at all?

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Just call it ...

        "Have you ever met any engineers?"

        Well, I are one, so ...

    2. My-Handle

      Re: Just call it ...

      Unfortunately, treating everyone you might want to get involved with your Coq project like children seldom goes down well, regardless of necessity. And how many times do you want to go through the "It's a fucking programming language..." conversation before you think "sod it, it's just going to be easier to change the name?"

      Some challenges or problems are best to meet head-on. Other times, it's just more practical to side-step.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Just call it ...

        "Unfortunately, treating everyone you might want to get involved with your Coq project like children "

        Where, exactly, did I suggest that?

        "And how many times do you want to go through the "It's a fucking programming language..." conversation before you think "sod it, it's just going to be easier to change the name?""

        To date, when discussing ANY programming language with programming professionals, I have never, not once, had to remind anyone it was a programming language that we were discussing. Professionals are funny that way, they understand what words mean in a given context.

        "Some challenges or problems are best to meet head-on. Other times, it's just more practical to side-step."

        I flat refuse to allow namby-pamby hand-wringers to pervert perfectly good technical terms just to make them feel all warm and cozy inside. THEY are the ones with the problem, not the technical language.

        1. My-Handle

          Re: Just call it ...

          "Where, exactly, did I suggest that?"

          My apologies. Perhaps I should have used the phrase "some people" rather than "everyone".

          By and large, I agree with your general sentiment. Most educated people know what terms like "blacklist" and "whitelist" mean in a technical context. However, it is clear that the name of this particular programming language is a barrier to those who maintain it. I've been developing software for close to a decade, and I'd never heard of Coq. I suspect that most of my immediate colleagues haven't either. If you dropped that name into a sentence, I would think you were using the slang term. I know at least a couple of my colleagues would have a snigger (one of whom is the IT director here, and I don't think that treating him like a child is a particularly good career move).

          Looking for a name with fewer negative connotations doesn't seem unreasonable in this case.

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: Just call it ...

            If I were to drop that name in a sentence, it would be blindingly obvious from the context that I was talking about a programming language you were unfamiliar with. Hopefully you and the professionals you work with (including your IT Director) would ask what the language was, instead of sniggering like schoolboys.

            The name has never had negative connotations to me, nor anyone I've discussed it with.

            It's mind-boggling the extremes that people will go to force this kind of thing to become offensive. It's a technical term used by technical people in a technical context. The only thing offensive about it is the way non-technical people abuse it out of that context.

            1. Disgusted Of Tunbridge Wells Silver badge

              Re: Just call it ...

              If there's any confusion, -'lang' is a common suffix - eg: golang.

            2. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

              Re: Just call it ...

              "It's a technical term used by technical people in a technical context. The only thing offensive about it is the way non-technical people abuse it out of that context."

              Right. It sounds like the language maintainers tried to keep that perspective for as long as they could, but have now admitted the language abusers are winning, at real cost to the language. "Offensive" is not just in the listener, it's also in the speaker. Communication happens on both ends, and trying to be all mature and enlightened when someone else is being abusive is not productive. Maybe in your meetings the mature people vastly outnumber the immature ones, and you can get away with an icy stare, but I'm sure that's not the same everywhere.

              1. jake Silver badge

                Re: Just call it ...

                They are giving in to people who bitch for the sake of bitching. That is grossly offensive to me, not least because it gives the bitchers a sense of power, and thus enables them to move on to the next thing to bitch about. Better to nip it in the bud.

                I don't need an icy stare. I fire dumbshits simply because they are dumbshits and I see them as more of a liability than a resource in ANY given organization.

          2. Disgusted Of Tunbridge Wells Silver badge

            Re: Just call it ...

            They are the sort of people you don't want anyway. They're going to cause problems regardless.

            Think of using puns for nether-regions as a filter.

            1. jake Silver badge
              Pint

              Re: Just call it ...

              Exactly, DoTW.

      2. heyrick Silver badge

        Re: Just call it ...

        "It's a fucking programming language..."

        Treat it as a secret test of character. If they can't get past the name, goodbye.

    3. Hero Protagonist

      Re: Just call it ...

      “It's all in the context ... If you are talking about a programming language, what kind of dirty minded twit automatically assumes it has to do with a penis? ”

      Judging by the many coq jokes, puns, and single-entendres in these comments, the answer to that question might be “an El Reg commenter”. Which kind of proves the point, to the extent that El Reg readership is representative of the IT community at large.

      1. John Sager

        Re: Just call it ...

        Yes, but we weren't talking about the programming language as such, we were talking about, and lampooning, the weak-brained fussbuckets that like to take umbrage.

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: Just call it ...

          I'm utterly appalled and offended that you didn't use the word fussbudget. My lawyer, who I pay more than Peanuts, will be in touch.

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: Just call it ...

        This is hardly a meeting or a board room at a Fortune 500, now is it. Rather, it's a forum where people go to blow off steam in a safe place. Like it or not, this is absolutely normal professional behavio(u)r. It even has a name ... "Hospital Humo(u)r".

        There is a reason we watched M*A*S*H and Blackadder ... pointing out the idiocy of reality helps everybody sane get through life without going quite insane.

        Blowing off steam is important in any high-stress environment. It happens everywhere, you can't get away from it. Usually it's just among peers who grok. Me, I shrug it off if I don't see the humor. Throwing a hissy-fit is pointless.

  9. W.S.Gosset Silver badge
    Happy

    Gotta admit...

    > "This similarity has already led to some women turning away from Coq and others getting harassed when they said they were working on Coq," the project wiki, last updated on Friday, explains. "It also makes some English conversations about Coq with lay persons simply more difficult."

    ...this paragraph gave me the giggles despite knowing the actual situation. Well done, Thomas, well done.

  10. Dr Scrum Master
    Coat

    Not a fan

    I've never been a fan of Coq, in fact, Coq sucks.

    I'll get my coat...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Not a fan

      "I've never been a fan of Coq"

      Why? Was it hard?

    2. jake Silver badge

      Re: Not a fan

      If Coq sucks for you, you might need a Coq proof assistant.

      Either that, or you're holding it wrong.

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Facepalm

    A clear case of English supremacists.

    Face it. English is not the only language of the Universe. The fact that a foreign word sounds bad in English, and one can't understand it's a foreign word, just means that person is an ignorant English supremacist. And they should be shamed as such.

    If they can't understand differences, have to destroy them because they can live only in their little poor world it's they that have to change, not the others.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: A clear case of English supremacists.

      For a far older example of the French doing this, consider the name of Merlin (Arthur's magician). He was called Myrddin in the Welsh folk-tales (Carmarthen, or Caerfyrddin, means Merlin's fort). When the French romance-writers started using them as source material, they altered the name to avoid the pun on merde.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Alien

      Re: A clear case of English supremacists.

      Meh, English isn't a language, it's the linguistic equivalent of the Borg collective.

      Lower your shields and surrender your language! We will add your linguistic distinctiveness to our own. Your language will be assimilated. Resistance is futile!

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: A clear case of English supremacists.

        Whereas the alternative is a bunch of old men running around saying "non, you cannot say 'podcast' " you must wait 5 years until the next meeting of the secret society where we decide its gender.

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: A clear case of English supremacists.

        Ain't nowt daft as t'English Language ... thankfully. When you think about it, this place would be awfully boring if we all spoke^Wtyped the same dialect and with the same slang. English is a garbage dump of a language, and one I love dearly.

  12. W.S.Gosset Silver badge
    Devil

    Add YOUR perhapslessthanformal Alternate Ideas HERE, Goys and Birls! :-

    How about...

    THRUST

    Theorem HeuRistic Uncertainty Specious Tits

    or-rrrr...

    SPREM

    Systematically Proving Rithmetic En' Maths

    1. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

      Re: Add YOUR perhapslessthanformal Alternate Ideas HERE, Goys and Birls! :-

      If they want to keep the history AND the reference&tribute to the early contributor, why not use a standard follow-on via Word Association (football) as per "Vin" above?

      So: Monsieur Coquand

      BALLS

    2. mutt13y

      Re: Add YOUR perhapslessthanformal Alternate Ideas HERE, Goys and Birls! :-

      How about "Richard"

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Add YOUR perhapslessthanformal Alternate Ideas HERE, Goys and Birls! :-

        Shortened to "Dick" for brevity, of course.

  13. fnusnu

    Wait until they come across GIMP.

    1. jake Silver badge

      We've already done that one to death.

      The folks in charge ultimately did the right thing. It's still called GIMP.

      So the whiners forked it (ooo, er ... ) around two years ago.

      I haven't yet seen a glimpse of the fork in the wild.

      1. This post has been deleted by its author

      2. TimMaher Silver badge
        Coat

        “Whiners forked it”

        Did you spell ‘forked’ properly?

        Any way, mine’s the one with a bottle of wine in the pocket.

  14. Friendly Neighbourhood Coder Dan

    Backsies should not be allowed!

    Smut names make everything better. Even more so if unintentional!

    This was another good one:

    http://aliprandi.blogspot.com/2013/03/inkulator-sounds-funny-for-italians.html

    I guess that was one of the very first times that being born there ( and speaking the language ) turned out to be an advantage :-)

  15. Big_Boomer Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    Member obsessed

    Why do we never hear of companies called Poussi or Minjj or Biivur? It's always nob names. Sexist I tell ya! ;-)

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Member obsessed

      My last "get rich" scheme was to make a lesbian focused version of Tinder and Grindr. I was going to call it Growlr.

      (For those not familiar with Yorkshire slang, growler is slang for the lady garden)

      1. cornetman Silver badge

        Re: Member obsessed

        And also a really good pork pie. :D

        God, I'm right hungry now.

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: Member obsessed

          Back in the '70s there was a butcher on Cold Bath Road in Harrogate that made really, really good growlers ... I can't for the life of me remember the name, but it was a family owned business, third generation I think. Probably long gone now, alas.

          I'm right hungry now, too.

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: Member obsessed

        Might not work all that well here in the States ... a Growler is a reusable jug used to take home craft beer from a brewery's kegs. Usually half a gallon (64 US oz), but both smaller and larger growlers exist, depending on brewery and jurisdiction.

      3. J.G.Harston Silver badge

        Re: Member obsessed

        Strictly speaking, growler is the lady tunnel not the lady garden.

    2. jake Silver badge

      Re: Member obsessed

      I see you've never been to Japan.

  16. macjules

    Contextual Advertising

    On a discussion thread regarding Coq and what advert shows up? One for Cockroach DB.

    1. W.S.Gosset Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: Cockroach

      That's insexism, that is.

      1. jake Silver badge
        Pint

        Re: Cockroach

        Entomoism, Shirley.

        I prefer yours, to be honest.

  17. katrinab Silver badge
    Coat

    If you are looking for a chicken-related name, then how about "Kentucky"?

    We have "Java" as a coffee-related name for a programming language.

    1. jake Silver badge

      Or Yardbird.

    2. IGotOut Silver badge

      KFC?

      Kan't Find the Chicken

  18. Torben Mogensen

    *Bleep*

    Given the sounds that cover up four-letter words on TV, how about using the name *Bleep*? I'm sure a suitable backronym can be found. "p" could obviously stand for "prover", and "l" could stand for "logic", but the people behind the language would probably prefer French words. Any suggestions?

    1. Irony Deficient

      Re: *Bleep*

      The French equivalent to “bleep” seems to be bip (which is pronounced like English “beep”).

      Is there a standardized pronunciation for the programming language Coq? If it should be pronounced as the French common noun is, then its pronunciation would be closer to English “cuck” than to “cock” — but perhaps the pronunciation “cuck” would also be unacceptable to some anglophone ears.

      I’m surprised that no one here (at this writing) has suggested replacing the rooster with a seal (pinniped) — renaming the language from Coq to Phoque.

      If the connection to Gallus gallus domesticus is preferred, then perhaps expanding Coq to Coquelet (“cockerel”) would be acceptable.

  19. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    Doodle?

    from

    Cock-A-Doodle-Do!

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: Doodle?

      AlphaGoo would probably sue.

  20. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    Paris

    For starters, it keeps the "French Connection"

    can't think of anything else at the moment

  21. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

    James May

    Every time he stuffed up on Top Gear or hit a problem, he called on this very programming language. Quite distinctly and quite frequently.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: James May

      He even got a custom registration for his own aircraft: G-OCOK

  22. Val Halla
    Happy

    It's all Coq to me.

  23. Pseudonymous Howard

    For us Germans it is "WIX" or "wix.com"

    The former is Windows Installer XML, an XML description of Windows Installer packages, the latter a web site hoster with easy editors. Both have in common, that the name very closely resembles the German "wichs", which is the imperative form of the verb "wichsen" which means (in the old fashioned meaning) to rub something and (in the current meaning) to rub the male reproductive organ.

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Re: For us Germans it is "WIX" or "wix.com"

      Only Germans could become excited by Windows installer XML

  24. Chairman of the Bored

    Much Ado about nothing

    Shakespeare would be appalled at this Coq-up.

    Arguably the greatest writer in English, Shakespeare demonstrated mastery of double entendre in all his works, but the title of Much Ado About Nothing is perhaps a triple entendre. "Noting" and "Nothing" had quite simimal pronunciations in his day. "Noting" or carefully observing others' behaviors would lead the main characters far astray. "Nothing" foreshadows the silliness of the conflict to come. "Nothing" was also slang for lady parts ...

    Yes, Signor Mountando has indeed returned from the wars...

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: Much Ado about nothing

      "simial pronunciations" would fit, but somehow I don't think that's quite it ...

  25. Disgusted Of Tunbridge Wells Silver badge

    Why not rename it "Bellend" and be done with it?

    1. Warm Braw

      It's certainly calling to me in Dutch...

    2. J.G.Harston Silver badge

      I drove past Bell End Farm the other day....

  26. Tanjailmaltija

    A Matter of Taste

    AuVin would do nicely... kangaroo words and all that jazz...

  27. Fr. Ted Crilly Silver badge
    Coat

    how about Capon ?

  28. ShadowSystems

    The new name is obvious, innit?

    "Throatwarbler Mangrove" pronounced "Ni!". Now let's all go to the pub for a pint on me & get RobbleRobble-faced...

  29. Wade Burchette
    Coat

    Irony

    I can't help but think of the irony of a bunch of cheese eating surrender monkeys naming their invention after a chicken.

  30. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Argh

    I was going to name my product Coquand. Balls.

  31. heyrick Silver badge
    Happy

    Easy fix

    Everybody knows that stuff in English is back to front to French.

    So just pronounce the name backwards. Job done...

  32. disgruntled yank

    Also

    In African-American slang in the southeastern US, "cock" refers or referred to a portion of the female anatomy. Whether this usage is still current, how far it made it beyond ethnic and regional bounds, I can't say.

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: Also

      The portion is the vulva, if anyone has a need to know. Very specific to the rural poor in the Mississippi River Delta. The only reason I know this is because I'm quite fond of Delta Blues and a few songs didn't make much sense. Apparently it's from the 17thC British use of the term cock as a non-gendered passive verb, as appropriated by the slaves in that area. I know an old black guy in Slidell, Louisiana who uses it in this manner, but outside some old Bluesmen I have never heard it used like that anywhere else in the wild.

  33. Robert D Bank

    Would Priapic stand up as an alternative?

    1. GrumpenKraut
      Coat

      Stand: yes. Alternative: don't know.

  34. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    "a male rooster"

    What other kind is there?

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      If you are going to start imposing rigid gender rules on poultry the internet is going to have something to say.

    2. jake Silver badge

      A male chicken that is no longer a rooster is called a capon.

  35. Jeff Younker

    If they rename to Coquand I'm definitely going top create a topology package named "Balls".

  36. Anonymous Coward
    Coat

    Just shift the letters along...

    In the same way IBM became HAL for "2001 A Space Odyssey", so COQ could become BNP.

    [Ah, um, I'll get my coat]

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Re: Just shift the letters along...

      It would be funnier to refer to the BNP as COQ....

  37. Kurgan

    Let's call it DIQ.

  38. youdidntsaythemagicword
    Childcatcher

    A bit of male anatomy slang

    Funny though - here in France, we widely use the word "bit" in computer science, as there's no French equivalent.

    Despite the fact that, in our language... "bite" (pronounced the same way) is French for cock (as in the slang meaning).

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: A bit of male anatomy slang

      And gee, gosh, willikers, nobody gets all offended.

      Can we please learn something from these people?

  39. Meeker Morgan
    Happy

    Calcule Un Nouveau Théorème.

    Name the programming language for what it does without getting cute about it.

    Then use the obvious acronym.

    1. Efer Brick

      Re: Calcule Un Nouveau Théorème.

      You can't

  40. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "How about "Bando," Portuguese for a group of roosters? Er, no. Another male anatomy reference in French slang."

    Frankly, they're being extra-cautious on this one. Its pronunciation is similar to "bander", but identical to "bandeau" (banner, headband), which is readily usable with no sexual connotation. It's merely the context that could suggest otherwise.

  41. QuiteEvilGraham

    Showing my age here

    Many years ago, if I recall correctly, there was a spooler for DOS called GRASP (Boyd Munro, SDI)

    A TP monitor called THIRST (Geoff Brown)

    An editor (sort of) for THIRST called SHAFT (Allegedly Geoff Brown's brother)

    Terrible names are nothing new.

  42. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

    How about.... "OK"?

    Hmm, on second thoughts, it's a bit saucy.

  43. AndrueC Silver badge
    Happy

    There's no place in programming for smutty names,

    Really, we should all try to be more mature.

    1. jake Silver badge

      Here's a little story, written in common UNIX terminology:

      gawk, grep, unzip, touch, strip, init, uncompress, finger, find, route, whereis, which, mount, fsck, nice, more, yes, umount, head, expand, renice, restore, touch, whereis, which, route, mount, more, yes, umount, ping, make clean, sleep

      Presumably the hand-wringing namby-pambys are planning on ultimately making this kind of thing impossible, right? No? Then what's their fucking point?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "Members: USHORT"

      Oo-err!!

  44. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge
    Alert

    Coq-Up

    A bug or defect in a Coq program

  45. two00lbwaster

    CoC is also used for Code of Conduct so CoD?

    Code of Decorum? Of coarse then there's the whole codpiece issue.

  46. martinusher Silver badge

    not exaactly a language for the masses

    If you look at the programming language league tables then Coq doesn't exist, its obviously an important tool but hardly one that's going to be used to code a web page or 'app' So I figure any controversy about the name is manufactured -- the people who use it are way beyond playing sophomoric double entendres with its name.

    I know about the English colloquial usage but if someone mentions 'cock' to me I picture a small, relatively flightless, bird that has a huge attitude problem. It thinks its bossing me about. I see it upside down in a roasting pan, golden brown skin weighed down with strips of bacon with ample supplies of roast potatoes sizzling beside it. The cockerel is also a symbol of a nearby country, something I associate with rugby.

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: not exaactly a language for the masses

      "So I figure any controversy about the name is manufactured "

      Isn't it always? The hand-wringing namby-pambys are on a roll, and they aren't going to stop until we stop them.

  47. ZootCadillac

    Cock of the school.

    Does this term get used in today's woke society? When I was at school in the 70's there was always a "cock of the school" who was considered the 'hardest kid' in the playground. This either made him a target or a person of awe to be revered. He was usually in the final year of high school and had a lot of hangers on whose reputation was far higher than their capabilities. By association of course.

    I once had a run in with our resident "cock" and his posse of council estate honchos. Took a few slaps and was derided for it amongst my peers for a few weeks. The same guy actually came to a school reunion about 10 years ago and oddly had the same attitude. Took offence to my car when I arrived and the "bullying" continued every time we passed at the bar. Went to the bathroom and had a little more of the same. Left the bathroom, he was asleep in the urinals. Nobody told him I fought competition pak mei kung fu into my mid thirties. Slowly slowly catchy monkey.

    Where was I, oh yeah coq. Not a good name for a business of any kind.

  48. StargateSg7

    Here in Metro Vancouver, Canada we have a local First Nations place name called Coquitlam, which is pronounced Co-Kwit-Lum --- May I suggest THAT as the new name of the Coq language?!

    Coquitlam aka COQUITLAM --- Done !!!! There is the NEW NAME !!!!

    v

    1. DanceMan

      And Coq is the abbreviation for Coquitlam, a major suburb of Vancouver.

  49. arachnoid2

    Just repronounce it

    Rather than renaming it altogether just pronounce the Coq as "Co" job, done now where's my £10,000 consulting fee?

  50. This post has been deleted by its author

  51. Richard 36

    "Oh, coq" - James May

  52. NickTheGeek

    The name is "coq"!

    Accept it or suck it!

    Enough with PC BS.

  53. Ernst Blofelt

    Back in the 90's

    Back in the 90s in an Oil tech company we would not start a project until we had a worked out a rude name for the project.

    it was the only we we could get the documentations done.

    that was before we had project managers and all that bollocks

    still the manuals looks lovely on the shelve.

    1. arachnoid2

      Re: Back in the 90's

      Did you have the male anatomy folders between the female anatomical folders?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Back in the 90's

        You have assumed the physical arrangement was just horizontal. The female ones could have been on the top.

  54. Field Marshal Von Krakenfart
    Gimp

    I wonder....

    Did they use the Gimp to create the logo?

  55. osxtra

    Why not just call it what it is: Proofman.

  56. Pat Att

    Just wait 'til they fork it...

  57. Glenturret Single Malt

    Gallus

    Gallus is a slang word used in Glasgow and surrounding areas applied to (usually young) males and meaning cocky.

  58. DM2012

    Alternative name suggestion

    Perhaps they should consider renaming it "pollo"? It captures the essence of coq but won't offend the Mericuns out there

    *sniggers in Spanish*

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