back to article Printers used to be a pricey luxury in Asian homes, then along came ... you know what

Analyst firm IDC has spotted up an uptick in the Asia Pacific region's printer market, thanks to a certain virus you may read about in the news of late. The firm's new Worldwide Quarterly Hardcopy Peripherals (HCP) Tracker noted 5.5 per cent year-on-year growth for 2020, taking units sold from 3.3 million in Q4 2019 to 3.5 …

  1. Pangasinan Philippines

    Copy shops closed

    Casualty of the lockdown (but don't call it a lockdown), are the low margin copy shops in the malls.

    Thrived on students report submissions but no customers.

    We have to use expensive book store copiers.

    What used to cost 40 centavos now costs 2.5 Peso each copy.

    Explains a lot of the above.

  2. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

    then along came ... you know what

    Hmmm, what could that be?

    Ah, yes Windows Update.

    1. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

      Re: 1 thumb down

      Do you really think that is going to have any effect on commentards' perceptions of Microsoft?

      Put some effort in, and tell us why my comment is so, so misguided.

  3. Arthur the cat Silver badge
    WTF?

    Hard copy peripherals?

    What deranged marketroid thought up that abomination of a term?

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