back to article Apple emits patches for iOS, macOS, Safari, etc to stop dodgy websites hijacking people's gadgets

Apple on Monday released security patches for macOS, iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, and Safari to fix up a vulnerability that can be exploited by malicious web pages to run malware on victims' computers and gadgets. Thus surfing to a dodgy page could be enough to hand over control of your iThing or Mac to miscreants. Apple thanks …

  1. The Sprocket

    Thanx for the heads-up. Sorted.

  2. Hubert Cumberdale Silver badge

    But... but...

    Macs don't get malware! </sarcasm>

    1. Tessier-Ashpool

      Re: But... but...

      Macs don't get viruses. A computer virus replicates from machine to machine via infected file transmission. Macs don't have those.

      Malware, on the other hand, is just as easy to install on a Mac as on any other platform. Less so if you opt to install apps from the Apple App Store.

      1. Charlie Clark Silver badge

        Re: But... but...

        A computer virus replicates from machine to machine via infected file transmission. Macs don't have those.

        There's nothing inherent in MacOS to prevent viruses and lots of malware use viruses to infect systems. MacOS is less susceptible to Visual Basic viruses but basically if you can trick any user on any system to install something then you can infect their system.

      2. No Relation

        Re: But... but...

        Okay, first, your definition of 'virus' is iffy:

        https://www.mcafee.com/enterprise/en-us/security-awareness/ransomware/malware-vs-viruses.html

        Second, Macs do get them. See these three previous articles, for example:

        https://www.theregister.com/2008/12/02/apple_mac_av_advice/

        https://www.theregister.com/2020/02/11/mac_malware_growing_malwarebytes/

        https://www.theregister.com/2015/08/04/thunderstrike_2_blackhat_vulnerability/

      3. Lee D Silver badge

        Re: But... but...

        Macs literally have AFS, NFS and SMB/CIFS support, so in fact they have MORE methods of transmission across a local network. In fact, it's required to enable the latter if you join it to an AD, like almost all corporate Macs are.

        This kind of ignorance is dangerous.

        Or do Mac people never use networks, NAS devices, iSCSI drives etc.?

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