back to article Drag Autonomy founder's 'fraudulent guns' and 'grasping claws' to the US for a criminal trial, thunders barrister

Autonomy founder Mike Lynch is part of a gang of "English thieves" who deserve to be extradited for targeting "their fraudulent guns" and "grasping claws" at "American companies and American money," the US government's barrister told a London court yesterday. Mark Summers QC did not hold back in his opening statement as he …

  1. Ben Tasker Silver badge

    > "The most important word in section 83A(2)(a) is the word 'a'. It does not ask you whether 'the' substantial measure occurred in the UK, it asks merely whether 'a' substantial measure of the conduct occurred in the UK. A substantial measure of conduct can occur in the UK even if the majority, even if the preponderance of it, is US centric."

    That seems a poor distinction for the pro-extradition side to make, you'd expect them to be arguing the other way, as their argument seems to say that it just needs to be a substantial measure, rather than the majority of the conduct.

    Which is reasonable, except:

    > (2)For the purposes of this section, the extradition would not be in the interests of justice if the judge— (a)decides that a substantial measure of D's relevant activity was performed in the United Kingdom; and

    So their argument seems to be that a minority of the conduct (so long as it is in itself a substantial measure) would be enough to bar extradition.

    Are El Reg sure it was the US's barrister that said this, and not the defence?

  2. Anne-Lise Pasch

    And yet when Americans run over kids in their SUVs and we ask them to face justice, they say 'no'.

    1. phogan99

      Why would they after the forum bar. Declining to prosecute let alone extradote hackers and one digital peeping tom doesn't exactly make for a great incentive to help. Won't be surprised if Mr. Lynch is suddenly suicidal, autistic, or suffering Alzheimer's.

      I don't think Biden is going to be willing to Boris any favors after the latter ran his mouth.

    2. Kane Silver badge
      Black Helicopters

      "And yet when Americans intelligence agents run over kids in their SUVs and we ask them to face justice, they say 'no'."

      There, FTFY

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        @kane - she was only married to an intelligence agent and wasn't protected by diplomatic immunity...

        1. TeeCee Gold badge
          Facepalm

          I'm pretty sure that it's now been established that actually she was and still is an agent.

          It's called "cover".

        2. Kane Silver badge
          Boffin

          "@kane - she was only married to an intelligence agent and wasn't protected by diplomatic immunity..."

          Sources, here, here, here and here.

          She was an intelligence agent...

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            There is no evidence that she or her husband had any position of note. Just that they worked on a US base.

            The dumb thing is that the driving offence is unrelated to her job and, unless you are implying it was deliberate, would be unlikely to result in more than a suspended sentence.

            Lots of people have car crashes. Mostly they don’t go to jail. She’s probably in more trouble for skipping the country...

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Somebody reading too much Tom Clancy?

            You never, ever, reveal your agents - even after they are long dead. Once the opposition knows someone is or was an Agent, every contact they have ever had comes under scrutiny just in case it might have resulted in some action being taken that might be of detriment to that opposition group or their friends. And if someone else reveals them, it doesn't matter if you refuse to confirm or deny they were an agent - confirming it means they are or were an agent, denying it means you are trying to cover up that they are or were an agent...

            And the other big question of course, is what was an active US Intelligence Officer (alleged) up to in the UK anyway? Other than driving on the wrong side of the road, that is.

          3. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            >She was an intelligence agent...

            That doesn't of itself give diplomatic status and/or immunity...

            1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

              No, but it gives the US incentive to refuse to extradite her.

  3. nematoad Silver badge
    Stop

    Not an option.

    "These all amounted to UK criminal offences, said Summers, "

    Then they should be tried in an English court and not used to assuage American amour-propre.

    What is wrong with British justice, eh USA? Not punitive enough for you? Or is another case of American exceptionalism?

    1. Lon24 Silver badge

      Re: Not an option.

      While I agree with you in spirit, I do not in practice. The US actively prosecutes and imprisons senior executives for financial crimes. High flying businessmen in orange jumpsuits is not an uncommon sight.

      But I'm racking my brains for when the last FTSE500 board member was put away. Oh, now I do. From Wikipedia:

      "Ernest Walter Saunders (born 21 October 1935) is a British former business manager, best known as one of the "Guinness Four", a group of businessmen who attempted fraudulently to manipulate the share price of the Guinness company. He was sentenced to five years' imprisonment, but released after 10 months as he was believed to be suffering from Alzheimer's disease, which is incurable. He subsequently made a full recovery."

      It's sad that senior business people may have little fear of the English judicial system. Just remember how many fraud investigations have failed. The system here is just not designed to combat white collar crime. It's good that someone else may do their job for them. Even if I agree US Justice has its blind spots too.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Not an option.

        I believe Mr. Saunders remains the only person in British medical history to have made a full recovery from dementia. I recall that at the time it was described as "irreversible pre-senile dementia" rather than Alzheimer's disease, but I don't know enough about either condition to know if they are related.

        Quite the modern miracle.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Not an option.

          Manuel Noriega had something similar, I believe. If not him, then some other communist dictator the British Government decided to give shelter to.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Not an option.

            According to Wikipedia, Noriega was imprisoned by the U.S.A, then France, then Panama before his death. No dementia, and no British "shelter" involved. Not much in the way of "communist" either, although a good deal of work with the CIA running guns.

            Were you thinking perhaps of Pinochet (definitely NOT a Communist)? He wasn't really sheltering in the UK either. He travelled here for medical treatment from Chile, where he lived openly. From memory the Home Secretary (Jack Straw) made the decision to release him on grounds of physical frailty rather than dementia. The diagnosis of "vascular dementia" was made in 2002 when he was ruled unift to stand trial in Chile.

      2. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge
        Coat

        Re: Not an option.

        The US actively prosecutes and imprisons senior executives for financial crimes. High flying businessmen in orange jumpsuits is not an uncommon sight.

        Does that extend to "high flying" orange hued businessmen?

    2. onemark03 Bronze badge

      What is wrong with British justice ...?

      Both.

      Tangentally, the Americans think they're so special that they don't take kindly to the idea that Americans be tried or otherwise/jdged by any other country. Why do you think the US has not joined the International Criminal Court?

    3. phogan99

      Re: Not an option.

      They could, but if previous cases are anything to go by, transferring evidence is apparently just too much work. The UK was going to let Bill Barr release two ISIS terrorist to the Iraqis where they would be hung after a very brief hearing. That is unless Barr promised not to seek the death penalty so the UK could hand over evidence. We can blow them up and shoot them, just not execute them......

    4. Imhotep Silver badge

      Re: Not an option.

      I believe the UK case against Mr Lynch and Autonomy is still undecided. Perhaps the question of extradition to the US should be put aside until that is decided.

      It would be a bad look to be found not guilty in the UK courts and then extradited to the US for what are essentially the same charges.

      1. MrReynolds2U Bronze badge

        Re: Not an option.

        It does actually sat in the article that the outcome of this case will wait until the civil case is decided.

        Also the alleged criminal activity that the US are citing do not actually match the charges alleged in the USA, in which case, they should be discounted. Additionally, no evidence has been presented to the UK court to substantiate these allegations so far.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Not an option.

        The UK case is only a civil case. No criminal case was brought because the SFO judged itself to have a conflict of interest, being major Autonomy customers.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Not an option.

          Are you sure? The Serious Fraud Office said "We are a customer of Autonomy, so we won't launch an investigation into them for criminal conduct"? I'd really appreciate a link to that story, so I can understand it better. It sounds a bit... odd.

      3. Dasreg

        Re: Not an option.

        As I recall Autonomy were great bs artists who talked about propriety AI systems but turned out to be resellers of overpriced hardware. Correct me if I am wrong.

  4. analyzer
    WTF?

    OOoooooK

    So criminal activity took place in the UK, some impatient blinkered USofA company decided to skip due diligence despite warnings of imperfections and drop a metric shedload of dosh to buy said company. <-- that's certainly my synopsis

    I just cannot see how this UK company harmed any USofA stockholders since it is the *board* of the USofA company that failed entirely to protect the company, and so the stockholders, by skipping due diligence. The US DOJ should be prosecuting the board members of the USofA company at the time of the takeover for gross criminal negligence or whatever they have over the pond, and the UK MOJ should be nailing up the cell door on Mr Lynch.

    Having just noticed that the US DOJ tries really really hard not to prosecute rich people the stockholders should be suing the members of the board at that time.

    1. Natalie Gritpants Jr Silver badge

      Re: OOoooooK

      Indeed, if selling overpriced stuff is illegal there are a lot of companies that should be worried.

      1. Hubert Cumberdale Silver badge

        Re: OOoooooK

        Apple, for one.

        <cue downvoting>

    2. Zimmer

      Re: OOoooooK

      "Having just noticed that the US DOJ tries really really hard not to prosecute rich people the stockholders should be suing the members of the board at that time.."

      Looks suspiciously to me like they're hoping to try and convict a foreigner in America in order to deflect any blame from the 'board' and convince the stockholders it was ALL his fault.

      1. Franco Silver badge

        Re: OOoooooK

        I've long thought that the crux of this case was protectionism, much like the Huawei furore. Much better to blame Johnny Foreigner for being duplicitous than admit incompetence.

        1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

          Re: OOoooooK

          Possibly, but I think it's smaller than that. People on the HP board were embarrassed. Someone called in a favor, and some prosecutor smelled a big career-enhancing case and ran with it. I suspect few or no people with real power in Justice or State care about this case at all; they're just letting it play out because now it would be embarrassing to retrench.

          In fact, senior people are probably hoping extradition is denied so they can make a stink about it and use it as diplomatic leverage, and won't run the risk of Lynch being acquitted here - which would put the blame squarely back on the HP board. If extradition is denied, everyone continues to be able to tell their version of the story with no official ruling one way or another.

          If everyone shouts a lot and goes home angry, we never need to know who would have won the game.

      2. RegGuy1 Silver badge

        Re: OOoooooK

        Bob on there, Zimmer.

      3. ecofeco Silver badge

        Re: OOoooooK

        That's EXACTLY what they are trying to do.

      4. cynic56

        Re: OOoooooK

        Standard American practice.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: OOoooooK

      Me thinks that HP doth protest too much.

      At the very least, the likes of Meg Whitman and Ray Lane should be disqualified from being board directors, but no, no, no, Whitman's incompetence was rewarded by Lane with the CEO role where she was a miserable failure.

      CFO Kathy Lesjack knew HP was over-paying and she was ignored. Mind you, if she had any principles - which clearly she does not - then she should have resigned and made her position clear to shareholders prior to he acquisition.

      Apotheker has admitted that he did not read the due diligence report, yet he received $13M for a 10-month demolition job on HP.

      Yet somehow Mike Lynch is the guilty one.

      1. Potemkine! Silver badge

        Re: OOoooooK

        if she had any principles

        She wouldn't be in the C-class of a multinational company!

    4. ecofeco Silver badge

      Re: OOoooooK

      This.

      HP failed its due diligence and now blames everyone but themselves.

      I've seen FAR too many audits at work to know this is the ONLY reason HP failed. And specifically, the psychopaths who were running company at the time.

      1. Aristotles slow and dimwitted horse Silver badge

        Re: OOoooooK

        Unfortunately it's not HPs due diligence that is on trial.

      2. Jaybus

        Re: OOoooooK

        But doing a poor job of due diligence is not a crime. Falsifying financials for the purpose of fraudulently inflating revenues and stock price is a crime. Garbage in, garbage out. While HP leadership is/was incompetent for not being skeptical, their incompetence is not a crime and certainly does not excuse Lynch's criminal behavior. If someone leaves their keys in their car and it is stolen, we say they were foolish, but the thief is still a thief.

    5. Jaybus

      Re: OOoooooK

      How did you conclude that HP skipped the due diligence? The HP board can hardly be held responsible for Autonomy's fraud and other crimes. Crimes are alleged to have been committed in both nations, btw.

      It's not so hard to see how stockholders were harmed. If Autonomy falsified financials, then they fraudulently inflated their stock price. Any stockholders who bought shares at the inflated price were harmed, whatever their nationality. Perhaps if the Serious Fraud Office were even slightly interested in doing their job the US wouldn't be asking for extradition.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: OOoooooK

        HP's CEO admitted on the stand that he did not read the due diligence report.

  5. 2+2=5 Silver badge

    How long before HP expressed interest did the 'ramping' start?

    Lynch is accused of various unlawful acts to make Autonomy appear to be far more profitable than it was. And the extradition legal argument is around whether they were carried out in the US or had an impact on US citizens or corporations. A pertinent question, therefore, would be how much of this activity occurred before HP expressed an interest?

    If it happened beforehand - in the hope of luring any buyer to overbid - then that would seem to be a UK only offence that can't count as having an American component because no buyer was known at that point. Once HP expressed an interest then it seems reasonable to count any further 'ramping' activities as having an American impact.

    My own recollection is that Autonomy was ludicrously overhyped from its very start, which would seem to point towards any alleged offences being UK ones.

    1. Androgynous Cupboard Silver badge

      Re: How long before HP expressed interest did the 'ramping' start?

      If ludicrous overhyping was a crime, yes. And god, how I wish it was.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How long before HP expressed interest did the 'ramping' start?

        I found one of their PowerPoint presentations once. I thought it was a very clever parody written by someone with a penchant for cladistic nomenclature. When I finished laughing, I showed it to my boss, asking which genius came up with this? She said "shhh ... forget you saw that. It's serious stuff. Apparently."

    2. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: How long before HP expressed interest did the 'ramping' start?

      > A pertinent question, therefore, would be how much of this activity occurred before HP expressed an interest?

      Well from Mark Summers QC opening submission most of it...

      In addition we can infer from his statement HP were gullible and couldn't (and didn't want to) see past the polish...

  6. Pete B

    Can't we just grant him retrospective Diplomatic Immunity?

  7. TimMaher Silver badge
    Coat

    Due diligence

    Yet again HP are avoiding the real issue, that their due diligence was not performed by a set of the usual culprits (was it E&Y? I can’t recall).

    I have nearly run out of popcorn. The last bag is in my coat pocket and my covfefe supply is still stuck in Zeebrugge awaiting customs clearance.

    1. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: Due diligence

      >Yet again HP are avoiding the real issue

      I seem to remember in one of the previous court cases, either the HP board said (or it went unchallenged) that they didn't bother to read the due diligence report...

      1. Will Godfrey Silver badge
        Black Helicopters

        Re: Due diligence

        Funny that. I seem to remember it too - hope we are not at risk of 'corrective' spook action!

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Due diligence

          Perhaps this article?

          https://www.theregister.com/2019/04/03/apotheker_autonomy_buyout/

          This quote may be what you are referring to:

          “Did you ever read any report by KPMG on the due diligence?” Miles asked Apotheker, to which the former CEO replied: “No, I didn’t.”

          1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

            Re: Due diligence

            To be more precise, Apotheker declined to read KPMG's preliminary draft, and fired them before they could complete the final report. Which I suppose was a sensible cost-saving exercise if he wasn't going to read it anyway.

            Reminds me of the old Mort Sahl joke about "a book this good, you don't have to read!".

      2. a pressbutton

        Re: Due diligence

        My memory says you are correct and also one person who pointed this out was 'let go'

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Due diligence

      It's more than due diligence. Autonomy was always an obviously overvalued company. Kind of like anything AI these days...

      Basically, HP paid far over-the-odds for a company producing a very, very niche product for data scientists.

      If you buy a blockchain company today, then expect a high risk of not making your money back. To buy a company you need to be sure that you buying them is going to increase that companies sales. Then you need to be sure that increase will pay back your purchase in 3-5 years.

    3. I Am Spartacus
      Mushroom

      Re: Due diligence

      Caveat Emptor

      HPE knew it was buying a niche company. It was paying top dollar. It agreed a sale but didn't read the due diligence report.

      Case closed.

    4. MarkSitkowski

      Re: Due diligence

      That's like blaming the victim in a rape case for not checking that it wasn't actually a real medical examination.

      C'mon...

      1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

        Re: Due diligence

        No nothing like it at all. The HP board were in a very good position to check everything about the transaction - in fact, they had a duty to do so. They had the time and the resources to do a very good job. In fact, they did fewer checks than I would for buying a new car, and failed to heed warnings about their negligence.

        A rape victim has neither the time nor the resources to check the credentials of the examiner or whether the examination is conducted properly. Not only is your comment tasteless, it is completely wrong.

      2. Kane Silver badge
        WTF?

        Re: Due diligence

        "That's like blaming the victim in a rape case for not checking that it wasn't actually a real medical examination.

        C'mon..."

        Not only is the comparison incorrect, but in incredibly bad taste.

  8. amanfromMars 1 Silver badge

    Where there's limelight there's always prima donnas

    Lest it be thought that Summers' fire-and-brimstone rhetoric makes him some sort of American lickspittle, he also represented Julian Assange in that man's battle to escape a US government extradition attempt.

    That's hardly a ringing endorsement, El Reg, although his activity is a nice little earner for him. There is surely no doubt about that.

  9. JJKing
    Facepalm

    They're a weird mob.

    I wonder how long it will be before the Septics try and extradite someone for exceeding the speed limit in their home country because it was faster than that in a similar area in the United States of World.

    Funny how a game played professionally in only one country on this planet where the winner can be called World Champions. They really do have an inflated opinion of their own importance eh.

    1. RegGuy1 Silver badge

      Re: They're a weird mob.

      They really do have an inflated opinion of their own importance eh.

      You mean Brexit? (EU will tumble like a stack of cards?)

    2. Neil Barnes Silver badge

      Re: They're a weird mob.

      I'm no expert on the game in question - I live on the other side of the pond - but wasn't it named for the newspaper that sponsored the competition?

      1. a pressbutton

        Re: They're a weird mob.

        Are you thinking of the US version of the World Wildlife Fund?

        1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

          Re: They're a weird mob.

          The baseball "World Series" is what I was thinking of.

          1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

            Re: They're a weird mob.

            Dude. The Toronto Blue Jays won that twice. Toronto is in Canada, which is not technically part of the United States.

            (Yeah, I had to look that up. Also, I think it would be hilarious if, say, Japanese professional baseball teams competed in, and won, the World Series. I might actually watch a game if that happened. I expect there would be rioting in the streets.1)

            1To the best of my knowledge, baseball has never led to a war, unlike football (soccer). But I have seen a baseball-related riot with my own eyes, after the Red Sox lost the Series in, um, whenever that happened. It wasn't much of a riot, as these things go; Bostonians are not among the world's great rioters. But there was some property damage and whatnot.

      2. MisterHappy

        Re: They're a weird mob.

        From a quick search because I too thought it was named after a paper...

        "The New York World was established in 1860, just before the Civil War, and it fared poorly throughout the 1870s before being bought up by Joseph Pulitzer in 1883. Over the next half-century, the World was renowned for everything from its “yellow journalism” to its debut of the crossword puzzle; in 1930 it was sold and merged with the Evening Telegram to become the New York World-Telegram.

        The New York World never had anything to do with the World Series, however, other than being one of the many newspapers to report the results. The modern World Series (like its predecessor series waged between National League and American Association teams from 1884-1890) was so named not because of any affiliation with a corporate sponsor, but because the winner was considered the “world’s champion” — the title was therefore simply a shortened form of the phrase “world’s championship series.”"

    3. phogan99

      Re: They're a weird mob.

      The sport is run by a corporation, Americans in general have no say in what they decide to call the events. Though if a country is the only one that plays a sport, that would make a winner effectively world champion. The U.S is perhaps the biggest but is not the only country that plays baseball professionally.

  10. Rol Silver badge

    The time to sell idiots rubbish never ends.

    I'm currently in negotiations with a developer in America who wishes to buy Bristol bridge. I know damned well he thinks he's going to get the Brunel designed suspension bridge across the Avon, as the money he's splashing around is far too much for the concrete monstrosity that is Bristol bridge and spans the tiny river Frome. But hey ho, he's the buyer, and it's not my job to advise he opens up Wikipedia and has a closer look.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The time to sell idiots rubbish never ends.

      The difference is that HP knew exactly what Autonomy was... They bought it because it was in the hipster sector of "Data Mining" which was to 1996 what "Blockchain" was to 2018.

      It was always "HP is cool and with it. We bought <brand name>"

    2. Citizen99

      Re: The time to sell idiots rubbish never ends.

      Better not go over the pond, mind.

  11. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    "potential buyers of the company, such as HP."

    HP is a big company. It had its own review of Autonomy finances. It's own internal high-ups were against the pruchase, but the nitwit at the top made the deal anyway.

    So, who is going to drag Apotheker in court to accuse him of 'grasping claws' ?

    Not to mention blatant incompetence ?

    1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

      Re: "potential buyers of the company, such as HP."

      It's not the grasping claws that get you, it's the fraudulent guns.

      Fraudulent Guns will be the name of my next band. (It will be a terrible band.)

  12. IGotOut Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Way to go!

    "English thieves have no expectation of local justice when they target their fraudulent guns or grasping claws on American companies and American money,"

    Great way to get an English judge on your side.

    1. MrDamage

      Re: Way to go!

      In this case, weren't the grasping claws on the US hands? After all, HP only seems to absorb other companies, rather than innovating these days.

      1. Roland6 Silver badge

        Re: Way to go!

        >In this case, weren't the grasping claws on the US hands?

        My thoughts also, as if memory serves me correctly, it was HP that approached and courted Autonomy, I also don't remember Autonomy advertising itself as being "for Sale".

        The final deal - all cash and at a 79% premium to Autonomy's prebid share price, would seem to support this point-of-view.

    2. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

      Re: Way to go!

      I took "expectation of local justice" in the technical legal sense of "a right to avoid foreign prosecution", in parallel with e.g. "expectation of privacy". I don't think it was intended as a slur, merely a claim that "if the alleged activity follows this pattern, the accused should be made available to the justice system of the offended country".

      Not saying I agree with it, just that I don't think it was meant as an attack on the UK judicial system.

    3. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

      Re: Way to go!

      Of course, just using the phrase "fraudulent guns" might be enough to lose the case.

      Though this could be established as an important legal principle. "Your honor, it's true my client attempted to hold up the bank, but the teller was able to discern that his 'gun' was in fact just his thumb and forefinger, and therefore fraudulent." But would it be mitigating or aggravating?

  13. Falmari Silver badge
    Facepalm

    The bounder the cad

    After the Mark Summers QC "English thieves" opening that had me holding back the tears I’m convinced extradite the cad.

    He certainly paints the story, HP a hick from the country first time in the big city is singled out by a gang of "English thieves". Who with their smooth, sophisticated dare I say decadent ways con the proverbial naive American abroad HP out of his poor old bedridden mothers farm. Extradition is too good for that bounder Mike Lynch, hang him I say.

    I think I may have heard this story before something about a cow some beans I think there was also a giant in there somewhere.

    Seriously a company is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it. HP with their accountants and bankers went over the company. So, the reports either valued at the price HP paid or they valued much less. If they valued it much less why pay what they did? What HP’s board did not read the due diligence reports then it should be the HP board in the dock.

    The English man they bought the company from did not look like this. https://c8.alamy.com/comp/BPTMP7/terry-thomas-actor-1968-BPTMP7.jpg

    1. david 12

      Re: The bounder the cad

      >HP a hick from the country first time in the big city <

      In amongst all the he-said / she-said, there's a little bit of interesting international finance: the American laws are different than the English laws.

      The Americans (claim to have) depended on the representations made by the English. In the USA, those false representations were illegal, which is why they didn't need an audit report and why there has been an American conviction. In London, those representations were only illegal if they contained specific false facts: just making up BS is only business as usual.

      Two countries divided by a common finance system.

      8:18pm AEDT

      1. Falmari Silver badge

        Re: The bounder the cad

        I know I have commented before that the are differences in the law it has also be mentioned in earlier articles on this HP Autonomy saga.

  14. Mariah Carey's fake legs

    I was disappointed...

    ... to find out that the article was not about a company called 'Drag Autonomy', as promised in the headline.

  15. Version 1.0 Silver badge

    Typo fixed

    Those allegations were summarised in UK court documents made public yesterday. Lynch is alleged by the US government to have followed standard American business practices:

    1. david 12

      Re: Typo fixed

      Lynch is alleged by the US government to have CLAIMED TO HAVE followed standard American business practices. Which is part of what made his behavior illegal in the USA. The American courts have ACCEPTED THAT Lynch represented that his statements were following American standard business practice, and that HP accepted that representation.

      I'm not barracking for either side: I don't know if it was reasonable for HP to expect a British firm to respect American law, or if the American courts got it right, or what British courts will make of the same allegations.

      If the Americans were alleging that Lynch had /actually/ followed standard American business practice, he wouldn't be in court.

      10:51AM AEDT

  16. Tempest
    WTF?

    Lest It Be Thought That Summers' Fire-And-Brimstone Rhetoric . . .

    All it proves is that no legal practitioner can be trusted and that every one of them has a price.

    But we all know that.

  17. Grinning Bandicoot

    ??HP??

    The discussion is now about HP, a corporation of dubious ethics, who got caught by others who out played HP at their game. This HP is a name plate and exists merely to mine leftovers after all the productive and innovative potions have been sold. HP must push the case as a smoke screen to cover the hollow core so the present board can safely parachute from the wreckage. Of course money does open door that thee and me will never see.

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