back to article Xiaomi revenues up by a third due to strong phone sales and triple-digit European growth

It has been a difficult year for the mobile industry as economic uncertainty and widespread national lockdowns further depressed the public's appetite for handset upgrades. Some vendors are faring better than others, however, with Xiaomi proving especially resilient. The Chinese gadget maker reported calendar Q3 revenues of ¥ …

  1. Mike 137 Silver badge

    Alternatively...

    "It has been a difficult year for the mobile industry as economic uncertainty and widespread national lockdowns further depressed the public's appetite for handset upgrades."

    Or maybe:

    "It's been a great year for the planet and poor people in the third world as vastly fewer perfectly functional phones have been chucked out for dumping and burning".

    The hi-tech treadmill we've got onto in the "west" doesn't just hit our pockets - it poisons people elsewhere as well. The only overall winners are the manufacturers, but some are now even fouling their own nests.

  2. NerryTutkins

    I bought a Pocophone F1 (xiaomi) couple of years ago. Cost me something like 200 quid. It had what was then a top of the range processor, decent RAM. Also bought my wife a Xiaomi, and then my daughter just a few months ago. Battery life is excellent, performance really good and nice camera too. The screen is maybe the weakest part, only in that it's not OLED, but still really crisp and brightness ok unless you're outside in bright sunlight. Back is plastic rather than glass, but for me that's a bonus because it's tougher. And they provide a free rubber case, and you really need a case on any phone anyway so the finish on the back of a phone is wasted on most users anyway.

    I get how people might pay multiples of price for desktop workstations or laptops with top notch processors and loaded with RAM for intensive tasks, but I really don't see any economic argument for 1000 quid phones. I am pretty sure that there is no performance benefit that would really improve productivity for anyone on the kind of tasks you do on a phone like talking, emails and a bit of browsing.

    1. Schultz Silver badge

      I like Xiaomi

      My daughter has a Xiaomi phone that was (is still) quite amazing for the money and their robot vacuum does a great job cleaning up the charger cables every day. Sorry, eating the cables and cleaning the floor.

    2. bengoey49

      Pocophone F1

      I often go to the far east and bought a Pocophone F1 just after its release in September 2018 to use in the East. Back in the UK I just connect it to wifi and use it for browsing, emails, Telegram, YouTube, WhatsApp etc. It still has regular updates, on Android 10 with security patch 1 September 2020. It is a solid phone with very good battery life. The WiFi and Signal receptions are better than my iPhone 11 ( which has the inferior Intel Modem ).

      The Pocophone F2 is much better with better screen but is now expensive , one common problem with moderately expensive Pocos is the limited 4G/LTE Bands covering mainly EU and some countries in the Far East so don't expect it to have good 4G reception in the US.

      Even the similarly priced or even cheaper Pixel 4a, iPhone SE 2020, OnePlus Noord have more than double the number of LTE bands. I expect the phones priced £400 -£500 to have more LTE bands coverage than what most if not all the top of the range Xiaomi phones have. For that reason I won't be buying Xiaomi phone if POCO F1 is unusable because it needs a new battery ( 94% at present ). If you don't go to the US and rarely go abroad Xiaomi phones are good value.

      1. Calum Morrison

        Re: Pocophone F1

        That would explain why my F1 had trouble in some rural parts of Utah last year. Mostly it was fine, but there was one day where it got nothing whatsoever and I had to bag some free wifi for map updates. For the cost of the phone and how good it's been otherwise, I can't complain.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Pocophone F1

        You do have to pay attention to the 4G bands. Buying the "Global" version mitigates the issue but not always.

  3. StrangerHereMyself

    Revenue is not profit

    They're selling their mid-range devices at cost price and are barely eking out a profit.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Revenue is not profit

      Citation please. Just because other handset manufacturers have conned people into believing £500-£1K is an acceptable price for a phone, doesn't mean that it is.

      1. StrangerHereMyself

        Re: Revenue is not profit

        https://blog.mi.com/en/2020/11/24/q3-2020-earnings/

        1.3 % net profit (by turnover) isn't exactly stellar and could well be from other stuff they're selling.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Revenue is not profit

          I thought they were using smartphone profits to grow their other target markets such as IoT and services? In which case yes overall profits would be lower than expected, but not because the margins on smartphones are so low Is there any data to suggest a Redmi handset is sold at cost??

    2. Neil Barnes Silver badge

      Re: Revenue is not profit

      I have had a couple of Xiaomi phones (as has the other half) and really can't see what extra I get for the next eight hundred quid. For what they are, they fit my use patterns and I can live with the non-oled screen. But then, two hundred quid? What's not to like?

  4. HarryBl

    I've got a Redmi that I paid £180 for. To get the same specs anywhere else I'd be looking at £300 minimum.

  5. nichomach
    Thumb Up

    Very happy Redmi Note 9 Pro user here...

    ...especially after the MIUI 12 update. Nice enough screen, decent camera and a battery the size of Mars. I'm not surprised their sales are doing well.

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