back to article Baby Yoda stowed away on Crew Dragon, boards International Space Station

Crew-1, the first ever four-passenger flight to the International Space Station (ISS) and also the first time NASA has formally used a commercial craft to carry astronauts, has docked safely. The craft brought Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker and Soichi Noguchi to the ISS. Noguchi was the last to emerge from Crew …

  1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge
    Pint

    Baby Yoda

    That's a bit disappointing. I thought it might be this one.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Baby Yoda

      Baby Yoda? Pffft! After the gremlins with the capsule hatch seal and the propellant heaters, it's obviously a Mogwai, and there's another one on board that must have been fed after midnight...

      1. HildyJ Silver badge
        Pint

        Re: Baby Yoda

        Sorry, it's a seemingly genuine Baby Yoda. Technically it's a “zero G indicator” which floats when the spacecraft has reached a microgravity environment. It's also a tradition.

        https://www.theverge.com/2020/11/16/21569387/spacex-crew-1-dragon-baby-yoda-zero-g-indicator

  2. Bit Brain

    It is the way

    "Where I go, he goes"

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: It is the way

      " Come on, baby! Do the magic hand thing.”

  3. Scott Broukell

    I really can't wait for the advent of truly commercial space tourism. Just think how wonderful it will be to have a hen night / stag party in micro gravity - all that vomit and piss floating about! (shudders, eeewww!). Mind you, a brawl breaking out between punters could be really hilarious to watch!

    1. Chris G Silver badge

      That bring a new meaning to the typical Spaced Clubbers that you see in Ibiza.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Has the launch rocket landing for re-use become so reliable that it is no longer mentioned?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      another day, another thunderbirds landing

      Yes, I had to go hunting to find footage of the booster landing and nobody mentioned if it did or didn't succeed.

      That's the best bit!

      Shame it wasn't a KSC landing - that is something else if you are nearby.... double sonic booms shake the ground!

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Shame it wasn't a KSC landing ...

        I've had Kerbal Space Cockup landings providing far more than a mere two sonic booms! :-)

      2. KarMann Silver badge

        Re: another day, another thunderbirds landing

        It was at night, in the dark, so there wasn't much to look at most of the time from the booster cam or the barge. That probably explains at least some of the lack of attention to it.

        1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

          Re: another day, another thunderbirds landing

          Also, part of the reason for cancelling the remaining Apollo Moon missions was lack of interest from the US public. Live and die by the Neilson Ratings :-)

    2. WonkoTheSane
      Headmaster

      AFAIK, the plan is to re-use the same first stage for the CREW-2 mission in 6 months time.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    $2700 per kilo?

    I'm sure Disney will pay way over that for the advertising.

    1. Chris G Silver badge

      Re: $2700 per kilo?

      Jeez! Don't give 'em ideas, I don't relish the thought of looking up at the moon and seeuny a mickey mouse shaped crater.

      1. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge

        Re: $2700 per kilo?

        Send up Pluto

      2. KarMann Silver badge
        Paris Hilton

        Re: $2700 per kilo?

        Did you miss this one a couple of months ago, then? They're already at work to commercialise the ISS, starting with 'skin serum'.

        1. Killing Time

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          Marstech skin products are a key economic driver for continued Mars colonization in Richard Morgan's 'Thin Air' novel.

      3. chrisf1

        Re: $2700 per kilo?

        Wasn't it an Asimov story that had a side reference to a soft drinks company paying to avoid another spray painting the moon with its logo?

        1. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          The Red Dwarf books explained that Nova 5 (the ship Kryten was found on) was on a mission to set off a supernova so that 'COKE ADDS LIFE!' would be visible in the sky, even during the day.

        2. abortnow

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          Robert A. Heinlein in The Man Who sold The Moon. Published 1950.

          From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Sold_the_Moon

          The technical problems are solvable with money and talent. To solve the tougher financial problems, Harriman exploits commercial and political rivalries. He implies to the Moka-Coka company, for example, that rival soft drink maker 6+ plans to turn the Moon into a massive billboard, using a rocket to scatter black dust on the surface in patterns. To an anti-Communist associate, he suggests that the Russians may print the hammer and sickle across the face of the Moon if they get to it first. To a television network, he offers the Moon as a reliable and uncensorable broadcasting station.

        3. John 110
          Headmaster

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          That'll be The Man Who Sold the Moon by Heinlein you're thinking of...

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Sold_the_Moon

          Oops too slow... somebody else posted first. There goes my geek cred...

        4. The commentard formerly known as Mister_C Bronze badge

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          Asimov's story was "Buy Jupiter".

        5. Chillihead666

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          Could also be Arthur C. Clarke's "Watch This Space", part of the series Venture to the Moon in the collection The Other Side of the Sky (and probably many others but that's where my copy is).

        6. TheOldBear

          The Man Who Sold the Moon

          Not Ansimov - Heinlein

          His hero managed to sell exclusive advertising rights to the Moon twice, as part of his fund raising effort.

        7. DiViDeD Silver badge

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          side reference to a soft drinks company

          Arthur C Clarke - Watch This Space, from his 'Venture to the Moon' short stories about the first team on the moon.

          Happy to help

      4. Mike 16 Silver badge

        Re: $2700 per kilo?

        Laugh while you can. Monkey Boy!

        Several years back (I had hair!), I met an engineer (moonlighting as a "conceptual artist") who had done fairly detailed preliminary designs to use a de-comissioned solar power setup in the desert (lots of steerable mirrors to concentrate sunlight on a tower-mounted boiler) and a servoed mirror to draw simple shapes on the moon, and had a potential customer.

        That customer bailed out after being reminded that they did a lot of manufacturing in places where desecrating the moon might affect relations with the host countries.

        This was related to me after I mentioned "pong on the moon", a little stunt involving a 2.5 second delay (about 150 samples, but I think we cheated with 128) in the control inputs to an "homage" to the classic game. No Lunar features were harmed in this production, but it was darn hard to play.

        1. KarMann Silver badge
          Boffin

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          That wouldn't work well with the laws of optics. The beam you get from refracting and/or reflecting sunlight will always spread out at least the angular diameter of the Sun, about ½°, or just about as wide as the Moon itself. Unless you stop down the aperture that actually hits the mirror, in which case the beam will be narrower, but with power reduced by the square of the aperture reduction. Or, to put it another way, from a given facility, any point on the Moon could never see the beam having a surface brightness brighter than the Sun, so to double the incoming radiation, you'd have to have a facility about the size of the Moon (coincidentally, in this case; really, needs to be the angular size of the Sun, which, from the Moon, makes it about Moon-sized) reflecting at the Moon from its entire surface, about 2,000 miles across. That's a pretty tall order.

          I wonder how far they got into the planning before this came up?

    2. WonkoTheSane

      Re: $2700 per kilo?

      Tom Cruise already has his ticket for next October.

      He's apparently going to film a "Definitely not Mission Impossible" movie up there.

      1. Chris G Silver badge

        Re: $2700 per kilo?

        With a little luck Cruise will like it so much he stays there, I can't watch him since he played the mini-me version of Jack Reacher.

      2. cornetman Silver badge

        Re: $2700 per kilo?

        Perhaps he is tasked with looking for Xenu?

        1. Chris G Silver badge

          Re: $2700 per kilo?

          It is Xenu who is causing the Plague ™, anyone who tries to solve the Thetan R6 implant will be killed by a pneumonia infection. Maybe Tom's going to have a chat with him?

  6. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

    Crew-1, the first ever four-passenger flight to the International Space Station

    So what was the space shuttle delivering then, chopped liver?

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