back to article SMEs to UK.gov: We need vouchers for tech and training ahead of final Brexit curtain falling

SMEs in Britain are urging the government to provide ‘transition vouchers” to be spent on tech, expertise and training as a way to help smooth the waves when the country exits the European Union. The plea for help was made by the head of the Federation of Small Businesses today as negotiators for the UK administration and the …

  1. Dan 55 Silver badge

    How to reach a trade agreement with 27-country union defined by legal documents

    1. Rip up the withdrawal agreement that you just signed with them less than a year ago.

    2. ???

    3. Profit!

    1. ovation1357 Bronze badge

      Re: How to reach a trade agreement with 27-country union defined by legal documents

      I thought step 1 was "Collect underpants".

      Actually, doesn't matter, it's the same difference.

      ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  2. Mike 137 Silver badge

    More than vouchers needed here

    Some detailed reliable guidance would also be a good idea. But of course that would depend on having a clearly defined a stable regime to base the guidance on. It seems from the news today (e.g. proposed legislation to override parts of the withdrawal agreement) that the ground rules are still changing (or more realistically, there are still no ground rules and HM Govt. is merely winging it), so I'm not at all sure how vouchers will help until this muddle is eliminated.

    1. Flocke Kroes Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: More than vouchers needed here

      No need for vouchers. Just do whatever you want because we are in control now.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: More than vouchers needed here

        Remember, Johnson said "f**k business".

        We really have a bunch of inept chancers running things, along with unelected bureaucrats like Cummings and Tony Abbott.. and soon to be trump...

        Was "giving away control" the leavers motto as it should have been?

        1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

          Re: More than vouchers needed here

          "unelected bureaucrats like Cummings and Tony Abbott"

          Unfair to bureaucrats. Bureaucrats have competence in doing things according to procedures. The procedures might be badly designed and the results in appropriate but they're predictable and competently followed.

    2. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: More than vouchers needed here

      HM Govt. is merely winging it

      We have had four years plus to prepare for leaving. The EU has prepared itself for whether we leave with a trade deal or not so I can't see that we won't equally be prepared. It's not like we're going to have to start bringing in foreigners to sort things out or don't have a clue what will happen.

      The one with the rolled-up "Armageddon 2021 - Told You So" T-shirt in the pocket.

    3. Warm Braw Silver badge

      Re: More than vouchers needed here

      I think what they actually need will be customs agents - or at least the 20% of FSB members that are actually exporters will do so. Vouchers aren't going to help with that.

      If anyone sees the smoke from the Brexit bonfire of bureaucracy, do please share a photo.

    4. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: More than vouchers needed here

      "proposed legislation to override parts of the withdrawal agreement"

      Probably Cummings told his puppet to be more disruptive. Nothing like a bit of disruption for making Johnny Foreigner cave in.

  3. A Non e-mouse Silver badge
    Mushroom

    Based on current form, expect a u-turn or two.

  4. Godwhacker

    It's a good thing that we're "holding all the cards" in "the easiest free-trade deal in history" or I'd be getting worried

  5. codejunky Silver badge

    Hmm

    "Businesses crave predictability, but Brexit uncertainty, compounded by the impact of the worldwide coronavirus pandemic - along with the accompanying furlough scheme provided by UK.gov, which is due to close next month - has left many fearing for the future."

    Almost as if dicking around instead of leaving was a bad idea. Instead of extensions and trying to keep us in against the various votes we have had we should have been out of the EU by now. The good news is we left before the federalised Covid bailout, that would have been expensive and difficult to leave.

    1. Adair Silver badge

      Re: Hmm

      Would you like to spell out in some detail what you understand the consequences of your preferred option would actually be (not just imagined), and how it would be so much better for the nation as a whole (not just those bits that are foaming at the mouth in anticipation of making hay)?

      Please.

      1. codejunky Silver badge

        Re: Hmm

        @Adair

        "Would you like to spell out in some detail what you understand the consequences of your preferred option would actually be"

        We would have been out of the EU already and these issues would be solved by now. Even if the lack of planning government had cocked up customs it would be resolved by now. As per the article years of uncertainty (an actual economic damage cause) would not have existed reducing the cost to the country of this 'negotiation'.

        Instead we have lockdowns and furloughs during covid (which I consider an overreaction and certainly is now) and businesses are still waiting to find out the situation with the EU negotiations.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Hmm

          Are you seriously trying to tell us that you think that the current Government could have managed to sort out a customs mess at the same time as dealing with Covid? They have been spectacularly inept at the latter, without the total mess of the former.

          If, as the article states, there will be, to quote you, " years of uncertainty (an actual economic damage cause)" How would that have magically vanished in 1 year?

          If you consider lockdowns during Covid to have been an overreaction, would you care to comment on the state of those areas of the US where they didn't implement even as half-hearted a lockdown as this Governmment did? Would you further care to comment on the fact that, since the easing of the general lockdown, cases in the UK are once again rising and we have seen a number of areas returning to a semi-lockdown?

          Posting as AC as I am skirting round what I am officially allowed to say on an open Forum due to my job

          1. codejunky Silver badge

            Re: Hmm

            @AC

            "Are you seriously trying to tell us that you think that the current Government could have managed to sort out a customs mess at the same time as dealing with Covid?"

            You need to reread what I said in my original comment. Had we left when we should we would have had this sorted long before now. Before Covid.

            "They have been spectacularly inept at the latter, without the total mess of the former."

            I agree.

            "If, as the article states, there will be, to quote you, " years of uncertainty (an actual economic damage cause)" How would that have magically vanished in 1 year?"

            You misunderstand. The years of uncertainty is what we have had, we voted leave and yet have to fight tooth and nail for a politician to actually get us out. Had we left when we should have we would not still be uncertain of what our arrangement will be.

            "If you consider lockdowns during Covid to have been an overreaction, would you care to comment on the state of those areas of the US where they didn't implement even as half-hearted a lockdown as this Governmment did?"

            Not really, the US is a big place of varying methods (different states etc). In the UK the lockdown was applied to stop the NHS getting overwhelmed, and it didnt. And it isnt. The lockdown doesnt get rid of the virus it is litteraly about limiting how many people get it at the same time. Not about stopping the virus.

            "Would you further care to comment on the fact that, since the easing of the general lockdown, cases in the UK are once again rising and we have seen a number of areas returning to a semi-lockdown?"

            Cases are irrelevant as a problem but cases to actual hospitalisation and actual death is the comparison worth anything. In fact we want the cases to go up but the other two down (death being the main one to go down). FYI you will get more cases as more testing is done (a shambles of the public sector in the US and UK) but also whenever lockdown is reduced. You cannot stop it. When people interact you spread the virus, you cannot lift lockdown without people interacting. And lockdown too long and people ignore it (as they did) and lockdown becomes worthless.

            "Posting as AC as I am skirting round what I am officially allowed to say on an open Forum due to my job"

            Cheers for explaining that but I would also like to say thank you for a polite response as AC. Doesnt happen often enough. Hopefully I have explained my position more clearly for you here.

    2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: Hmm

      I don't think there's any evidence that all those campaigning for leave* had any idea what to do after the vote. Cameron was going to stay on and run it. Where was the essential planning before the vote? Where were the impact assessments? Where was the cost/benefit analysis?

      Vote Leave were caught in the headlights by winning and then being left to deal with the reality of it. They still are. That's why they're "dicking around" in your words. It's all they've ever done. Their one hope is that, arguing form a position of extreme weakness, they can persuade the EU to give them a safety net.

      * Those that actually believed they could win which I'm not convinced with all of them.

      1. codejunky Silver badge

        Re: Hmm

        @Doctor Syntax

        "I don't think there's any evidence that all those campaigning for leave* had any idea what to do after the vote"

        Leave like remain was made up of a lot of people with various opinions of how to go forward. That both sides were made up of people wanting trade with the world and people wanting isolationism from free market to commie made the arguments varied and incompatible.

        At the same time we had a remainer Cameron to lead the way, and leave had Farage (not in power) and Boris (finally in power). Until now we have had Cameron insisting he would stay regardless of the result (then running thank god) to be replaced by May (ffs) to finally after all this time have one of the leave campaign in charge and with 1 year to fix everything including previous bodge jobs.

        "Cameron was going to stay on and run it. Where was the essential planning before the vote? Where were the impact assessments? Where was the cost/benefit analysis?"

        Well said. The stitch up was so sickening that our own government could be so against its own population. All power gatekeepered by Cameron and his insistence that he will remain regardless of the result.

        "Vote Leave were caught in the headlights by winning and then being left to deal with the reality of it"

        The brexit side were ready. The only one in any position of any power being Farage from the EU machine. As has been made clear, here is the deadline and we are going on that date, do with that as you will. This is only a recent stand as of Boris (hate singing his praises as I still dont trust him). Finally a leave leader.

        "Their one hope is that, arguing form a position of extreme weakness, they can persuade the EU to give them a safety net."

        That is the remain position. Leave is pretty unambiguous, we are going deal or no. The position of weakness has been begging for a deal we dont need and an extension we dont want.

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