back to article You've had your pandemic holiday, now Microsoft really is going to kill off TLS 1.0, 1.1

Having issued an all-too-brief stay of execution on the decidedly whiffy Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 and 1.1 protocols in Microsoft 365, the Windows giant has announced that deprecation enforcement will kick off again from 15 October. The protocols were actually deprecated back in 2018 but Microsoft halted enforcement …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Skype

    Instead of dicking about adding backgrounds, couldn't they make it actually quit when I click quit. So that I don't have to open task manager and kill a bunch of processes. And maybe it could not reinstall itself every time I remove it from startup programs.

    We use Skype a lot for company meetings, but sometimes I don't want people to be able to call me. You know, so I can get some work done.

    1. Hubert Cumberdale

      Re: Skype

      Also, could they make it actually deliver messages to me, please? It's been decidedly flaky for some time. A couple of days ago, someone sent me a message at 0830, and when I actually spoke to them in person at 1700, it still hadn't appeared. It only arrived after I did a hard log out–log in (but by then its delivery was of course pointless). This has been happening a lot lately, and it's driving me nuts.

    2. Mandoscottie

      Re: Skype

      Or ofc you could untick autosign in sfb options....tadaaa problem solved and login when you need it? Or if thats too much clicking use dnd mode when you dont want disturbed?

      How we manage the teams and skype setup corpwide.

      Simples really.

  2. tip pc Silver badge

    Built on strong secure foundations

    "the first secure global SD-WAN service built natively on Microsoft Azure"

    What will possibly go wrong?

    Also expect regular scheduled Tuesday/Wednesday outages.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Built on strong secure foundations

      Never used Azure then? Just making unfounded assumptions?

  3. Binraider

    Project reunion? Has the sopping mess that is the windows api suite finally clicked with its creators? One can’t help but think that with all the layers of duct tape a clean start might be what’s really necessary rather than adding yet another plaster on top.

    1. Kristian Walsh

      Yes, but they did do a "clean start": it was called UWP. Developers looked at it, then wanted to keep the duct-tape version, because they had a pile of code written for it already that worked, and porting costs have a ROI of close to zero.

      This new initiative (which, if you ask me, should have been started at the same time as WinRT back in 2012) lets developers keep their existing code, and use the useful bits of the new APIs.

      1. Binraider

        Sounds like more layers of tape to me. Library programming is meant to take the tedium out of common functions - yet what we see here is just more layers of dependency hell that only someone close to the architecture can ever unpick. Makes it hard to keep an application stable from one version of Windows to the next, or implementation of .net to the next. We've seen life-critical equations give different answers to the same inputs due to hidden away changes in library functionality over the years. It might be old but I sleep somewhat better knowing that the maths function libraries I have in Fortran 77 remain consistent, even if the poxy UI over the top does its damnedest to tell you otherwise.

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