back to article The world's nonsense keeping you awake in middle of the night? Good news. Go outside and see this two-tail comet

A two-pronged comet with billowing tails of gas and dust will streak across the sky this month. If you're in the northern hemisphere, and gazing up at the right moment – around 4am local time, July 10 to 15, looking northeast; and potentially an hour after sunset, July 14 to 23, looking northwest – you should catch a glimpse …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    This comet wouldn't be the one that turns us all to dust, zombies, starts making all the machines go crazy or makes us all blind with plants invading is it? It has been a relatively quiet start to July so far.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      re: relatively quiet

      Umm, what planet are you on? Some place peaceful and plague free?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: re: relatively quiet

        You must be new here...

        Whilst not formally required in the comments, it is advisable to assume large doses of sarcasm to almost any comment in the register.

        And in reference to the first post, it'd make a nice change of pace if it does play out that way..

        1. Paul Herber Silver badge

          Re: re: relatively quiet

          " a nice change of pace"

          So, how is the cricket going?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: re: relatively quiet

            Lots of ball tampering.

    2. heyrick Silver badge

      The way this year has been going, I'd suggest "all of the above" as the final option.

      I bow to my dusty plant based overlords...

    3. Marketing Hack Silver badge

      This comet brings murder hornets in it's wake! Maybe those Middle Ages guys were smarter than we give them credit for over comets being heralds of misfortune!

  2. Spherical Cow Bronze badge

    "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

    Which means two things:

    1. I won't see it where I am (Australia) because it will be below the horizon.

    2. You won't see it where you are (the UK) because it will be raining.

    1. HildyJ Silver badge
      Pint

      Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

      Not to mention that the light pollution from ElReg's readers' collection of devices will wipe out any chance of seeing it even if the weather cooperates. Which it never does.

      Yet another event that we'll have to "experience" via someone else's pictures.

      Cheers to the comet for avoiding travel restrictions.

    2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

      "You won't see it where you are (the UK) because it will be raining."

      The weather has been quite nice recently. This explains why it's now cloudy with intermittent rain and likely to remain so for a while. I wonder if the newly BREXITed Britain can get a nice trade deal with Oz? We could export rain and buy lamb.

      1. Paul Herber Silver badge

        Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

        Just not the lager. Please, not the lager!

        1. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge
          Pint

          Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

          Nah, import the larger. It means more of the good stuff for the rest of us who know better.

          1. logicalextreme Bronze badge

            Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

            If nobody wants it then maybe the comet could swing by and pick it up before making that return trip to the outer Solar System?

            1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

              "If nobody wants it then maybe the comet could swing by and pick it up before making that return trip to the outer Solar System?"

              D'ya think that will get it cold enough to take away the taste?

      2. Tom 7 Silver badge

        Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

        The weather has been weird - I earned more for my spring PV FIT than it cost me to fill the oil tank up to warm the house for the summer cold and rain!

    3. Anomalous Cowturd
      Coat

      Re: "For the UK, the comet is circumpolar"

      > 2. You won't see it where you are (the UK) because it will be raining.

      But hey, it's summer in the UK. The rain will be warm(er).

      I'll be needing a coat, obviously.

  3. arctic_haze

    So many comet flops

    I waited for Kohoutek, I waited to Halley. None of them was really visible using the naked eye, except for ideal conditions far from sky-polluting city lights.

    1. Red Ted
      Pint

      Re: So many comet flops

      I remember watching Hale-Bopp though, without trying to hard.

      That's what makes them worth waiting for. When you can see them clearly when strolling back from the pub of an evening that makes them all that more splendid.

      1. Jonathan Richards 1
        Joke

        Re: So many comet flops

        Oh, you shouldn't try to hard while comet-watching. Spoils the stability of your viewing platform, and distracts from all things astronomical.

    2. Tom 7 Silver badge

      Re: So many comet flops

      In the late 60s or early 70s my Dad woke me in the early hours and I noticed my curtains were glowing green! After being cajoled into some warm gear we popped outside to see a bright green comet that lit the whole countryside up, I'm in a dark sky area now but if its near the horizon these bloody security lights the farms have may be a problem - good way to find you have cataracts these days when you cant get to the opticians!

    3. ibmalone Silver badge

      Re: So many comet flops

      Managed to see Neowise from London last night. You do need a low horizon, and it's easier with binoculars or camera, but once you know where it is it can, just about, be seen with the naked eye. Would be much better in properly dark skies though.

      1. Graham Newton

        Re: So many comet flops

        I saw it from a playing field near my town centre. Once you knew where to look it was fairly obvious with the naked eye. I did find it at first by scanning with my binoculars checking each star for a bit a fuzziness when the tail appeared spread right across my field of view. A real WOAH moment.

    4. Mike Richards

      Re: So many comet flops

      It was visible to the naked eye in SE England about midnight last night even despite some low haze and the inevitable sky glow. It was sitting very low on the horizon and quite easy to spot.

      No of course I didn't have my camera with me! I got home, charged it and now that the forecast for the next few days is cloudy.

      1. ibmalone Silver badge

        Re: So many comet flops

        Yes, think I got lucky on Saturday night, Sunday it was less easy to see with some hazy cloud, and now the forecast here is cloudy for the next two weeks. Ah well, Jupiter is very nicely visible right now and not going anywhere fast.

  4. Red Ted
    WTF?

    "the naked eye may do just fine"

    Not with my prescription it won't. Without my gasses (which need replacing urgently anyway) I struggle to see much beyond the end of my arm!

    1. logicalextreme Bronze badge

      Re: "the naked eye may do just fine"

      I'll save any snarky comeback and just say that this typo made me happy. :)

  5. 89724102172714182892114I7551670349743096734346773478647892349863592355648544996312855148587659264921 Bronze badge

    Too many British clouds this morning, will use my private jet tomorrow

  6. Neil Barnes Silver badge

    Amazing... finally the weather cleared up enough to see it

    Having tried - and failed - to see it in Berlin[1] on Friday night (I wanted to show granddaughter, who was highly excited at the prospect but fell asleep around half past ten) managed to see it last night (Sunday) from Hemel in the UK. There's a convenient gap in the houses and the council have recently fitted LED streetlamps (though one of my neighbours insists on an outside spotlight that triggers on every passing snail)...

    But even at eleven, it's so close to setting that there is still significant light from the sun. Once found, it's a barely visible naked eye object from here, but binoculars show it clearly. It should be higher in the sky tonight, and the forecast is clear, so I'll drag the 6" celestron out and maybe stick a camera with a long lens...

    [1] we were hoping for the triple of the ISS, the comet, and maybe an early Perseid meteor... I suppose one out of three ain't bad!

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020