back to article Here's a headline we never thought we'd write 20 years ago: Microsoft readies antivirus for Linux, Android

Microsoft has extended its antivirus package for servers – better known the Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) for servers suite – to Linux as a general availability release. Redmond said today that the ATP-for-Linux port will run directly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS, Ubuntu, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, Debian …

  1. sabroni Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    cool

    Sounds like a good idea!

    1. oiseau Silver badge
      WTF?

      Re: cool

      Sounds like a good idea!

      Cool?

      Good idea?

      You're either joking or just didn't notice when your mates spiked your ale.

      Fortunately, I'm not running a server or have responsibility for maintaning one.

      But if I were I would not let any MS software crap near it.

      Not if Hades froze over.

      Twice.

      Good idea indeed ...

      Sure.

      O.

      1. Mage Silver badge
        Coffee/keyboard

        Re: cool

        Though MS Defender on Windows might be better than almost all the 3rd party AV software sold for windows. I think in most cases, and for zero-day, blocking scripts on the Browser is more effective.

        1. Psmo Silver badge

          Re: cool

          Why would your server have a browser anyway?

          1. sev.monster

            Re: cool

            Ones in my cluster <u>that I do not administrate</u> have Chrome, CCleaner, Nanite, ...

            Emphasis required else I would rightfully have to shoot myself.

  2. redpawn Silver badge

    Too Bad that

    Linux doesn't come with any security built in. I'm waiting with bait like breath for the opportunity to try such well regarded software on this Manjaro box.

    1. nematoad Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: Too Bad that

      "Linux doesn't come with any security built in."

      Well maybe not the masses of add-ons needed when you want to run Windows securely but that's because Windows was never built with security in mind and has been playing catch-up ever since it was released.

      Linux, the kernel, on the other hand has followed Unix in as much as security is something thought about and implemented. I'm sure Linus Torvalds had security forefront in his mind when starting the development of Linux and I don't think he is going to change now.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Too Bad that

        Linux, the kernel, on the other hand has followed Unix in as much as security is something thought about and implemented.

        Which is nice, but then they go and layer a shower of shit called systemd on top of it which, no doubt, has been riddled with exploitable flaws from day one.

        Even the hallowed ‘su’ has had its own exploitable problems, and not in the dim and distant past either...

        To be more abstract about it, Linux is a legacy OS written in a dangerously tricky language, C. Starting again in Rust or converting over to it is probably the way to go to be sure if eliminating whole classes of bug. Fuchsia has rusty bits, Redox is all Rust, and even MS is thinking about such a move quite seriously. Linux may start looking positively antiquated before too long.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          @AC - Re: Too Bad that

          Yeah but it surely wouldn't be thrashed by a font rendering. Since you seem to know much about modern languages, you're not suited for C programming. That is reserved for real pros who know what they're doing. It is not a dangerously tricky language it just requires you to master it before actually write a single line of code. It also requires the programmer to concentrate on what he is doing instead of adding bells and whistles and rushing code into production.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: @AC - Too Bad that

            The mistake you're making is to think that a real pro would stick with a language like C or C++ when there is a better alternative (and Rust is an especially useful alternative because it integrates with C nicely). C/C++ requires extensive care, review and testing to ensure memory correctness. The Rust compiler does all that dreary work for you.

            You can stay there, back in the past, chiselling out code in with you little C hammer line by line, but the world will likely move on to Rust. Only an amateur would cling to the past for the sake of it.

            Take a look at the Redox project. The most notable thing there is how quickly it's gone from a standing start in Aug 2016 to a running desktop only a short while later. That's pretty fast work, for a small team.

            Legacy projects have to consider the possibility that they'll get left behind, and cannot afford to be dealing with memory fumbles, archaic language syntaxes and avoidable bugs whilst competing projects aren't.

            1. khjohansen
              Joke

              ... The $$ compiler does all that dreary work for you.

              Buahhahahhahahaah .. hahaha ... hahhaha!!1!! *heave* *heave* Bwahahahahah...

              If I had a $$ [currency unit] for every time...

        2. oiseau Silver badge
          WTF?

          Re: Too Bad that

          ... but then they go and layer a shower of shit called systemd on top of it ...

          Quite so ...

          But that's Debian and that Poettering DH's take on what the init system should be like ie: an abominable piece of steaming crap.

          Inexplicably, quite a few distributions have followed suit even though it flies in the face of the Unix philosophy of 'doing one thing and doing it well'.

          It is not part of Linux (the kernel).

          O.

          1. sev.monster
            Holmes

            Re: Too Bad that

            Poettering worked at Red Hat when he and Sievers started the systemd project, and Fedora and then RHEL were the first to adopt it, with Fedora enabling it by default. Debian would not select it as the default in 8/jesse until years later, and not without much discussion and controversy that continues to this day.

            Red Hat have been the only ones to adopt systemd without some kind of massive internal controversy (that we know of).

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Too Bad that

            It is not part of Linux (the kernel).

            True, but:

            1) Irrelevant; try using the Linux kernel without a user land on top of it or (in the case of microservices) being compiled in with it,

            2) Irrelevant, as the Linux kernel's security correctness is for nothing if the available userland ecosystems that run on top of it are themselves flawed.

            3) Ignores the fact that, whilst the Linux kernel has been moderately OK w.r.t. security flaws, it's been far from perfect. I chose not to mention that originally largely because I'd rather have a dig at systemd, which has been a needless, unasked for mess imposed by a few people in a position of influence on everyone else. The Linux kernel project in comparison has been run a lot more carefully, and it would be a shame if it fizzles out simply because it fails to take a bold decision at an early juncture.

            Plus, a Linux kernel re-write in Rust would be an ideal opportunity to re-licesnse it at the same time; re-written modules can be licensed in anything they want; GPL3, whatever.

        3. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Too Bad that

          To be more abstract about it, Linux is a legacy OS written in a dangerously tricky language, C. Starting again in Rust or converting over to it is probably the way to go to be sure if eliminating whole classes of bug.

          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Nonsense written by somebody who never quite grasped pointers.

          Starting again in rust ? No concept of just how long it takes to write code properly. I've come across this type of programmer before. Wants to rewrite everything because he doesn't understand other people's code. I once let it happen, what a disaster that was.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Too Bad that

            I'll have you know that this old AC has had a firm grasp of pointers since the 1980s, when there was no choice in the matter, and still does.

            I also have a firm grasp, having been around for a long time, on how much project time gets used in review, testing, bug hunting and support, and how valuable it is to the goals of a project to use something that reduces that. Writing code in C/C++ and ensuring that it has been written properly simply takes more time than it does in Rust.

            Nonsense written by somebody who never quite grasped pointers.

            Listen up, youngster, it's supposed to be the hot new bloods rushing off to use new technologies and lanaguages. If you're being left behind by us old fogies, you're in for a nasty shock.

  3. Sanctimonious Prick
    Devil

    The Gap

    Heh! MS found a gap in it's Data Harvesting Project. Hooda fort?

    1. sev.monster
      Paris Hilton

      Re: The Gap

      Any relation to Hooba stank?

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Small correction

    ATP-for-Linux is able to scan for Windows malware.

    1. DS999

      Re: Small correction

      Yes, that's mostly what Linux admins would want it to do. If you have a Linux server that's handling Windows files/attachments like mail servers, web servers, or whatever and your security rules require virus scanning then you have to install antivirus on Linux.

      A lot of people are paying a lot of money for commercial AV software on Linux for that very reason. The article doesn't say, but if this is free or at least much less costly than the usual suspects Microsoft is going to get a lot of converts.

      1. poohbear

        Re: Small correction

        Clam-AV ?

        1. DS999

          Re: Small correction

          Wouldn't meet the requirements of most corporations because there's no one standing behind it with a support contract. Same reason big corporations install RHEL on their Linux servers not CentOS.

      2. Phil NZ

        Re: Small correction

        It’s EDR capability is probably more useful in many Linux server scenarios. You can run in EDR only mode.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        @DS999 - Re: Small correction

        That's mostly what Windows admins want Linux servers to do. It has been on their wish-list for a longtime.

        This is a typical scenario for Windows shops reluctantly accepting Linux servers on their network.

  5. Tim99 Silver badge
    Trollface

    Careful!

    It's a trap I tell you.

    1. BenDwire Bronze badge
      Linux

      Re: Careful!

      Come here ... let me embrace you!

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        @BenDwire - Re: Careful!

        You may ssleeep safe and sound

        Knowing that I'm around.

        Kaa, the snake - The jungle book.

  6. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge
    Linux

    No no and thrice no

    This disease isn't going anywhere near my Linux systems. Disease you ask? Yes, MS is spreading almost as fast as CV-19 and is just as deadly to your data as the real thing is to your health. Once infected there will be no way to totally eradicate it other than a complete security erase and re-install.

    The 'emperor' penguin says no!

  7. Maximum Delfango
    Boffin

    Microsoft has extended its antivirus package for servers...

    ...by finally shipping a Windows uninstall tool that actually works.

  8. Paul Johnston
    Joke

    Whatever they do...

    Cannot be worse than McAfee!

    1. bobsmith2016

      Re: Whatever they do...

      Leave my coffee out of this.

    2. My other car is also a Trabant.

      Re: Whatever they do...

      Only if it also shoots computers while surrounded by women in bikinis, and then adds on extra Microsofty goodness, it might be.

  9. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    Beware of Geeks bearing gifts.

    1. nematoad Silver badge

      Agreed.

      Aye, and on a similar note.

      If you dine with the devil sup with a long spoon.

      MS stuff? Not on my systems. That's why I took the trouble to switch to Linux.

  10. Chris Hills

    Telemetry

    It was likely quite easy to port to Linux, and they realized there is plenty of data they could slurp up as a result.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      @Chris Hills - Re: Telemetry

      With the added bonus of reducing performance to "acceptable" levels. Gee, these Linux servers are soo slow, they're not worth the trouble.

  11. hoola Bronze badge

    The long game

    Microsoft is doing a lot to embrace Linux with the new features in Windows. At some point I fully expect to see a Microsoft licensed distribution of Linux that will have all the Powershell stuff crammed in. Licensing to start with will appeal to companies that maybe have a small Linux footprint and currently either use commercial distributions (RHEL etc) or open source with no, or limited support. It will be commercially beneficial to use the MS distribution because it will be bundled with any existing MS agreements. Companies are used to dealing with Microsoft so market share will increase. In education commercial Linux distributions with support are very expensive when compared to the Campus agreements Microsoft put in place.

    Once it is in, it will become increasingly difficult to get out. Microsoft are then in a win-win situation where it does not matter which OS you use, they will still get your money.

    For better or worse, commercially Microsoft could end up being dominant in both Windows and Linux.

  12. A random security guy Bronze badge

    Run like crazy

    No Microsoft software.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020