back to article Bricks and mortar chemists take down Indian contact-tracing website

The Indian government has suspend the sales of medicine through the companion website of its COVID-19 tracing app in response to a petition signed by 850,000 bricks-and-mortar chemists. The Aarogya Setu Mitr portal, which is linked to the government's COVID-19 tracing app, Aarogya Setu, provides Indians sheltering at home with …

  1. BigE

    How about we start a petittion so see that India starts selling real drugs

    I think that you would prefer an app that steered you to reputable places that see real drugs not counterfeit ones. Disgraceful that they only care about lining their pockets.

  2. Bertieboy

    Pedant note: Pharmacists not chemists please, us former members of the Royal Society for Chemists are keen to maintain the distinction.

    1. BigE

      Yeah, I guess you have your own image problems, after Walter White showed what you are *really* like. So you broken bad yet?

  3. Dan 55 Silver badge

    "Indian law prohibits online medicine sales under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940"

    Maybe it never defined how online medicine sales should be done so there's a honking great legal vacuum but I can't see it prohibiting them.

    1. Jimmy2Cows Silver badge

      Re: "Indian law prohibits online medicine sales under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940"

      Speculation... perhaps the law explicitly states that medecines may only be purchased from traditional pharmacies with an actual, physical, bricks-and-mortar* shop. Thus making any other purchase channel automatically illegal, without needing to predict the future.

      *Accepting there would not be a need for "bricks-and-mortar" terminology in 1940, as there was no need to differentiate traditional stores from online stores.

      1. Insert sadsack pun here

        Re: "Indian law prohibits online medicine sales under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940"

        The Act won't have been unamended since 1940. It just means the first version was passed in 1940.

  4. David Gosnell

    At least they HAD an app

    No further text.

  5. monty75

    Kind of ironic that they're complaining of a breach of the regulations when any medicine shop in India will hand over whatever prescription medicine you ask for regardless of whether you have a prescription or not.

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