back to article Dropbox attempts to muscle into password manager market with passphrase wrangler, document vault

Dropbox is entering the password manager market with a slew of new features and services, including the ability to store and save login details, as well as a vault feature for sensitive documents. First, there's password manager Dropbox Passwords, which puts the biz in direct competition with established outfits like 1Password …

  1. Pascal Monett Silver badge
    Devil

    Here we go again

    "the company would soon be able to pull in every individual’s emails, Slack messages, and another other incoming information and magically sort through it "

    Great. Yet another company that wants to manage my life for me. For a small fee, of course.

    Vade Retro, Satanas.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Here we go again

      and presumably if they have your password will be able to read all yoru messages and then suggest third party advertisements tailored to your particular needs or fetishes?

  2. jake Silver badge

    "the company would soon be able to pull in every individual’s emails, Slack messages, and another other incoming information and magically sort through it, giving people only the most important stuff. How? Artificial intelligence."

    The question is, what kind of Natural Stupidity will it take to swallow that this is a good idea?

  3. PeeKay

    The LAST place I'd store my passwords

    Dropbox has added to their board Condoleezza Rice - of ex-US-Secretary of State fame (https://www.theverge.com/2014/4/11/5605734/dropbox-ceo-defends-adding-condoleezza-rice-to-board) - this alone gives me the heebie-jeebies.

    I've been using Bitwarden for a couple of years now after I looked for a subscription replacement for 1Password. Never looked back, pay the yearly fee, and I can host my own Bitwarden server if I ever want to - all passwords controlled locally. A much better solution IMHO.

    1. logicalextreme Silver badge

      Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

      I'll be looking into that! I've What made you ditch 1Password, out of interest? I've been eyeing it up for ages but figured I'd end up getting four other people on board to share a family plan with. KeePass's Android implementations seem to have come a long way since I last checked so I may take the dive on doing that this week.

      1. PeeKay

        Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

        "What made you ditch 1Password, out of interest?"

        They went from a paid model (and I'd paid for all of their apps on win/mac/phone/etc) to a subscription model exclusively. I moved - they then re-started to offer a much more expensive perpetual licence - so they lost a customer.

        Happy to pay for features. Not a full price subscription for a password manager though.

        KeePass - I used that for some time, but found that what was great on one platform was god-damned awful on another - no consistency.

        1. logicalextreme Silver badge

          Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

          Aaah, I see. It's a sorry state of affairs that the subscription model has become so normalised that I hadn't even considered that they used to do a one-off charge.

          And yes, that's what I'd heard about KeePass's varied offerings last time I was looking into it. I think I'll give them both a shot and see how I feel.

          1. emag

            Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

            Across Linux (me) and Windows (SWMBO), we've switched to KeePassXC, which is compatible with the KeePass databases, but the UI is better, and it's being actively maintained. Nice if you don't want to use KeePass with its .Net (or Mono) dependencies, and KeePassX hasn't been maintained for a while now. XC also has FF & Chrome plugins to fill in passwords (and I know they work on Linux, which most of the other KeePass variants don't do, or don't do well).

    2. autisticatheist
      Happy

      Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

      I switched from LastPast to BitWarden and am very happy with it.

      1. logicalextreme Silver badge

        Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

        LastPass was the company standard at my last job and I hated it.

        Sharing was so convoluted, and I seem to recall impossible unless you'd set an entry up specifically as a website password. This meant that you'd have to recreate the entry if you forgot (because you couldn't change the type afterwards) and all of the shareable passwords ended up with an http schema prefix in one of the fields regardless of whether that was appropriate or not. All passwords that had been shared with me ended up in some magic hidden area of the interface, the link to which only appeared in the interface if I clicked into a particular part of the interface and back out again.

        I could not, for love nor money, get it to log me out. I'd log out, go back to LastPass.com and I was logged in again. I gave up trying after a couple of weeks and didn't have to log in ever, excepting the very first time, across the entire three or four years that I worked there. That "session" survived tens of Vivaldi upgrades, both big and small.

        Then there was the time the entire service went down for a few days. Awful product. Wouldn't wish it on an enemy.

    3. Zippy´s Sausage Factory
      Black Helicopters

      Re: The LAST place I'd store my passwords

      Yeah I'm a BitWarden fan too. And I agree - Dropbox's seeming attempts to become the lord of all data is making me twitchy as well, especially given Condoleeza Rice is still on the board.

  4. Mike Shepherd
    Unhappy

    Safe harbour?

    Dropbox, the company that gave my email address (and many others') to spammers, wants me to trust it with passwords?

  5. Roland6 Silver badge

    "The idea is that Dropbox will put together a compelling suite of products and services..."

    Suspect the main target will be businesses, where these are effectively value adds on to their cloud storage purchase. To the bean counters, the boxes will be ticked...

    1. Screwed

      Re: "The idea is that Dropbox will put together a compelling suite of products and services..."

      Dropbox were not cheap, but quite useful. Then they made a substantial increase in their prices and semi-justified it by increasing storage allowance. Despite people like me already having far more than I need. A clear case of telling their low-end customers they were no longer wanted. Several people I know were similarly unimpressed.

      Yes, does look as if they only wanted "real" companies. Certainly I would never now recommend them to anyone - business or personal.

  6. steelpillow Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    One password I'd store in it

    Currently the Dropbox service uses Google to manage and verify its web login. The usual two or three Google javascript servers have to be enabled and allowed to scrape up your shit before your ID/password are accepted. Clearly, one object of this exercise is to remove Dropbox's dependency on soiled chocolate, and hence also their clients'. One vileness less has to be a good thing.

  7. Boufin

    Password Safe for all your password need. Nice Android client too.

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