back to article Whatsapp blamed own users for failure to keep phone number repo off Google searches

An infosec researcher reckons Whatsapp was a bit too quick off the mark to blame its users when hundreds of thousands of phone numbers, names and profile pictures were found to be easily accessible via Google. Athul Jayaram, a self-described “full time bug bounty hunter”, published a blog post earlier this week highlighting …

  1. Snake Silver badge

    It's an unknown

    Is there any good reason, besides the equivalent of waving your hands above your head and yelling "Look at me! I'm so important!", to actually choose to use any of these social media constructs? Every single one violates your privacy by digging deeper into your personal life than you really expect them to. Every single one has security issues. Every single one tries to entice you deeper into their plot of 'connecting everyone!', that being world domination for their exclusive benefit.

    Every single one is a money-making sham, and you're the sucker.

    1. steviebuk Silver badge

      Re: It's an unknown

      "Is there any good reason"

      Yes. Some years ago I ended up spending over £100 in txt messages as I'd gone over my limit. Then a few years later I'd reach my limit so had to wait for the new month. Then I finally forced myself to sort out my old shitty contract.

      Anyway. I then discovered WhatsApp and realised I could essentially send txt messages and picture messages for free.

      1. heyrick Silver badge

        Re: It's an unknown

        "I could essentially send txt messages and picture messages for free."

        So can I. From my phone. Standard part of the contract. No third party data guzzle service required.

        1. IGotOut Silver badge

          Re: It's an unknown

          A LOT of (UK) contracts exclude MMS in your call plans. For example, I just checked and 3 charges 55p each, Giff Gaff 30ppm

          Add to that, many emojis can get changed to MMS, it can add up.

          1. iron Silver badge

            Re: It's an unknown

            Emojs are sent as UCS2 text, that can cause a lot mere segments to your text than old GSM.7 but they are not sent as MMS unless your message is exceedingly long. Unless by 'emojis' you meant stickers or gifs.

          2. TwistedPsycho

            Re: It's an unknown

            .....and Vodafone, certainly last time it caught me out, converts a three text long message to MMS

        2. Sandtitz Silver badge

          Re: It's an unknown

          My kids have €6 contracts which includes 4GB data (no speed cap), but phone calls and txt messages cost extra. The monthly bills are typically €6 apiece since they mostly call and text their friends and family via Whatsapp using (home) wifi and most often don't exceed the pooled data allowance. (i.e. they have 8GB to burn together).

        3. luminous

          Re: It's an unknown

          Now try sending that text abroad. Won't be so "free" anymore.

          Look, WhatsApp has become a necessary evil. Even more so now that Facebook own it, but I'm not going to force a client to use a communication service of MY choice, it's always their choice. Otherwise, you know, they will find another service provider.

          This story is more about how lazy people are to add a number to their phone. Is it really that hard to type in someone's phone number.

          I miss Pidgin..... but can't use it anymore because all these modern communication apps are proprietary.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: It's an unknown

            Er...I do.

            No way I'm installing a different client for each client. I always make sure I use something ubiquitous.

            WhatsApp...as naff as it might be these days...is reasonably lightweight (very few frills or bullshit bells and whistles), I can use it with Franz and pretty much everyone has it.

            It's also old person friendly.

            Some clients I have use Telegram, which I'm also fine with for similar reasons to WhatsApp...I suspect the security of Telegram is better as well.

            Platforms I fucking loathe:

            Teams

            Slack

            Discord

            Or anything that has some sort of managerial tracking functionality.

            The UpWork desktop client can go and fuck itself as well. Anything that allows a client to "drop in and check on you unannounced" can fuck itself.

            That functionality doesn't keep workers honest, it keeps talent away from you.

            The profit in this industry is in speed and efficiency. Upwork seems to have missed that and wants to encourage lead swinging.

        4. steviebuk Silver badge

          Re: It's an unknown

          But there will be a fare use policy in there. Like there was on mine yet I managed to go "over" my "unlimited" txts. They should be banned from using the word unlimited when it clearly isn't.

        5. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: It's an unknown

          That data is deffo being guzzled mate. SMS messages and MMS is largely unencrypted. You're even easier to spy on / analyse / eaveadrop than someone using WhatsApp.

          In fact you're more vulnerable to accidental eavesdropping as well if you're in range of a stingray.

          At the very least I'd encourage you to use Signal.

          I'd rather have my data slurped by an ad slinger (bound by data protection laws and privacy laws) than any service provider with the government's fist up its ass working it like a fucking puppet. They aren't bound by anything and are likely partnered into some sort of "it's only meta data" dragnet.

          "I'm boring, I've got nothing to hide!" I hear you cry. Yes you do, everything. Humans are lazy and if your metadata happens to line up with some sort of investigation, you'll become a suspect, which could ruin your life because people like you with "nothing to hide" also use other dumb phrases like "no smoke without fire".

      2. Julz Silver badge

        Re: It's an unknown

        So you desperately wanted a service but didn't want to pay for it. You then found a 'free' service on the internet that seemed to provide what you were unwilling to pay for. All is good, until the dawning realisation that there is no such thing as a free lunch and that you are in fact paying for the service by having your identity monetized. No shit. Who would have thought.

        1. BrownishMonstr Bronze badge

          Re: It's an unknown

          WhatsApp used to be a paid for service, free for the first two years then a couple of quids for a year or so

      3. illiad

        Re: It's an unknown

        so what service charges for txt?? most I see are 'unlimited' ...

        AH!! some phones send GIANT txts 'as MMS' .. you need to get a better texting app, that enables you to disable this..

        1. illiad

          Re: It's an unknown

          note that MMS is part of your DATA charges, and can be limited, and suspect to extra roaming charges..

          1. BrownishMonstr Bronze badge

            Re: It's an unknown

            Not for me, it costs when sending images via SMS.

            1. iron Silver badge

              Re: It's an unknown

              You can't send images by SMS, that would be MMS.

              1. BrownishMonstr Bronze badge

                Re: It's an unknown

                You're certainly correct, but who cares about naming the protocol when you're just a user.

      4. NATTtrash Silver badge

        Re: It's an unknown

        "Is there any good reason"

        Yes. Some years ago I ended up spending over £100 in txt messages as I'd gone over my limit.

        OK, so downvote me for being old enough to remember red man size boxes on the corner of streets that enabled you to communicate with people over some distance. Indeed, it took you some effort, and wasn't available every moment you had to do a poo (unless you did a poo in... sorry... too many pints... digressing... ).

        But... The world did function back then. We all did get on with our lives. Maybe we were a bit more independent, a bit more resilient, and not that bothered about whether your following thought you looked better without underarm hair.

        Maybe the realisation should sink in this is not a FB, WA, or whatever companies problem. They just do what companies have always done: identify an apparent (created or not) need and offer it to their (created or not) target audience/ customers. The issue is that these (potential) customers seem to have the idea that this is an essential, vital, life requirement. If that dawns, the discussion becomes more in line with the substance dependency discussions: who is causing factor: those who offer, or those using it (excessively)? With some (mainly entertainment based) "experiments", asking people to live X period without their mobs, and their apparent inability to do so, I think the conclusion quickly skews to the latter. So the grumpy old person conclusion might be: stop moaning about your own self-inflicted dependency, and change your life (for the better) if that's what it needs.

      5. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: It's an unknown

        Signal is developed by people with a good track record in security, encryption and privacy, so, while the ability to message and call people for free (aside from any data charges) is indeed a good thing, it makes sense to choose a better messaging service than Facebook-owned WhatsApp (and you just know that Facebook are up to no good with the metadata).

        1. eionmac

          Re: It's an unknown

          Regret, My family refuse to use Signal, as THEIR friends do not use it and have never heard of it.

      6. Kane Silver badge

        Re: It's an unknown

        "Anyway. I then discovered WhatsApp and realised I could essentially send txt messages and picture messages for free."

        You are the Product.

      7. Charlie Clark Silver badge

        Re: It's an unknown

        Some years ago I ended up spending over £100 in txt messages as I'd gone over my limit.

        I think this tells us all we need to know. SMS was initially free until the networks realised how many people were prepared to pay well over the odds to use it. It was then only a matter of time until a data-based service would undercut it: the writing was on the wall with the stupid implementation of MMS, which was mainly about the billing. If the phone networks had gone for volume then, they would have become the social networks.

        I haven't paid € 100 a year for a mobile contract for something like ten years because it's surprising how easy it is to wait just a bit rather than send yet another banal status message or question.

    2. Glen 1 Silver badge

      Re: It's an unknown

      "Is there any good reason, "

      In addition to the above good reasons:

      Network effect.

      If the primary means of communication used by your peers or your family is not one you use, you will not be communicated with. If you say you don't have/use X, it will be met with instructions on how to get it, rather than a search for alternatives.

      Thus now Facebook is old news, we had the rise of BBM (and subsequent fall), and Snapchat, with TickTock on the horizon.

      Slack, discord, and telegram are for tech geeks. IRC? whats that?

      1. ecofeco Silver badge

        Re: It's an unknown

        Sad but true.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: It's an unknown

        If your friends and family all voted Nazi and explained to you how to do so would you join them?

        1. jason_derp Bronze badge

          Re: It's an unknown

          "If your friends and family all voted Nazi and explained to you how to do so would you join them?

          I mean, that's an enormous false equivelancy. Regardless, if voting Nazi got you free cell phone bills you'd see a ton of red armbands pop up. Sorry.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: It's an unknown

            But, thanks to [your] insistence of using these social media apps as a pathway to *your* expected communications, you expect everyone that you wish to communicate with to join the system. Thereby guaranteeing that THEIR data privacy is invaded, and some of *their* personal information is by necessity granted during the signup.

            Thanks to your unilateral decision that these people need to connect with you by *your* method, their options are limited and they are expected to toe the line.

            So no, it is NOT false equivalency. Some of you people join and then expect everyone else you touch to do the same for YOUR convenience and benefit.

            I was just asked to download and use WhatsApp for a group motorcycle ride several weeks ago. I absolutely, sternly refused. "Then how can we communicate with you?" You won't, apparently, because you decided that [my] choice of privacy has no bearing on how you decided to proceed with the planning of this.

            And I'm sick and tired of people making trying to make those decisions for me. What I join is MY choice and if YOU want to play "But I want to use this exclusively!"...then, apparently, I really didn't need to talk to you.

            1. jason_derp Bronze badge

              Re: It's an unknown

              Signal just let's me text to anybody whether they have it or not, and I've literally never cared what apps somebody I know uses unless they've expressed an interest in privacy. And you do not seem like a reasonable human I'd like to talk to. The implied ideal world you're describing is literally the one we live in.

    3. doublelayer Silver badge

      Re: It's an unknown

      Here's a reason that might work. I currently live somewhere and I have a number there. I'm considering spending a longish time in a different country, and that country doesn't have the same telephone service providers. If I ask people in that country to use my number from this country, they may incur international charges. If I ask people from this country to use the number I get from that country, they will incur international charges. If I keep a roaming account in use on my phone, I will incur roaming charges. If I find the cheapest possible plan and use it to keep my number from this country, then people can still reach me through Signal on that number. While Signal works for most of my friends, WhatsApp, Telegram, and pretty much every other chat app works on the same basis. So, for anyone who wants to contact me, they can do so for free without worrying what country I'm in. For anyone I want to talk to, I can do so for free no matter which country I'm in. In order to keep this, I only have to pay a very basic phone bill rather than a bunch of high roaming bills. That's simpler and cheaper for everybody. I don't like WhatsApp very much and don't use it myself, but if I do move out of the country, I may have to get it for friends who don't like Signal.

      1. Insert sadsack pun here

        Re: It's an unknown

        I don't love Facebook but asking there is any good reason to use WhatsApp just shows a degree of ignorance and a lack of imagination. Not everyone has a phone contract (plenty of people esp in developing countries) just use their device on wifi, not everyone has texts and data included in their contract, not everyone has international texts and calls in their contract, its easy to use so grandma gets it, it's got free video calling, its encrypted (to a degree...).

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Is there any good reason...

      Yes. Because you need to look at me because I'm so important.

    5. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: It's an unknown

      >Is there any good reason...

      Don't have any friends?

      I use WhatsApp as a unified messaging app. In one place I have all my text and image exchanges with individuals and groups.

      In the case of my deaf friend, they can send me pictures of documents for me to read and comment on and we can refer back to older messages if necessary, for real detailed stuff we obviously resort to email. With SMS/MMS, I would not have our conversation in a single place in a coherent order, plus the images of letters would be unusable. Yes, I'm sure specific messaging app's on specific devices might permit me to do this, but WhatsApp is device and carrier independent - useful if you lose your phone - obvious having backup enabled is a necessary prerequisite...

    6. The Dogs Meevonks

      Re: It's an unknown

      Yes... but you just have to choose which ones you use very carefully... for messaging... use telegram or signal.

    7. Piro

      Re: It's an unknown

      I can tell you, living in a country apart from my family, that Whatsapp has proven to be a simple and easy method (for all) to keep in touch, for free, without any logins, sign-ups, social media pages, or any other such complications. No usernames to be shared, just the phone number they already know.

      Would I prefer an open-source piece of software instead? Yup, but introducing any hurdles, or an unfamiliar piece of software can be confusing for some. Whatsapp fills a simple need, and actually does it surprisingly well. I also pushed back against it for some time, but for me, the benefits have outweighed any negatives so far.

      I'm no fan of Facebook, and personally don't have an account, but there's very much value for me in being able to conduct a group chat with my family, overseas, for free. Fact is, life isn't black and white. Sticking to dead-end principles just leads to you looking like Stallman.

    8. Michael Habel Silver badge

      Re: It's an unknown

      Well being able to stay in contact with my Wife in Jamaica is a pretty good reason to use WhatsApp.

  2. steviebuk Silver badge

    Still has an issue

    With profile or being discovered is on by default and you have to specially go in and set yourself to private or allow only your contacts to add you.

    Which means I still have old friends I no longer see in my phone book with their old number. That number that now belongs to someone else who hasn't hidden their profile. So I can now see "Sally" appears to now be "Dave".

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Still has an issue

      JK Rowling is not impressed...

  3. spudmasterflex
    Facepalm

    ‘hoover up your users’ phone numbers’

    Vacuum you mean

    1. RM Myers Bronze badge
      Coat

      Vacuum?

      Just because their security leaves you breathless, that doesn't mean there is an absence of air.

    2. Blazde

      Pro tip: If you accidentally hoover up your phone number put on a dust mask and google in the bag for it.

  4. Falmari
    WTF?

    Bug

    How the hell can they blame their users for choosing to make their phone numbers public.

    They are the ones to make it public by putting the unencrypted phone numbers on the web. But hey to make it easier they even make them visible to search engines.

    They add a new feature for people to use and then blame their users for using that feature.

    They are the ones to blame for designing (I use the term lightly) and then coding a piece of software without once ever thinking about security from beginning to end.

    To make it worse they do not even see it as a bug and refuse to pay a bug bounty. I can see why. Athul Jayaram did not find a bug in the feature, because the whole bloody feature is just one giant bug.

    1. Chris G Silver badge

      Re: Bug

      The response from What Saps is typical of the Zuck Empire, nothing is ever their fault, they are just doing their best (to make money from your data).

    2. IGotOut Silver badge

      Re: Bug

      It's not a bug, it's working exactly as intended.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I don't use WhatsApp because it's owned by Facebook

    Mark Zuckerberg is a certified cunt so I'm afraid you're really not paying attention and deserve what awaits if you decide to use any of his company's products.

    1. steviebuk Silver badge

      Re: I don't use WhatsApp because it's owned by Facebook

      Yes he is a cunt but I was using WhatsApp before he owned it and when I had to pay yearly for it. I enjoyed it, was very useful and now, although I hate Facebook, I'll stick with WhatsApp. I'm also well aware for it to be free they'll have sold my data. Not bothered. Rather that than have to pay for WhatsApp. If I get cold called because of it, I simply say nothing and hang up. So all good.

  6. davenewman

    How soon until the first GDPR complaint?

    1. TwistedPsycho

      Just as soon as the ambulance chasers realise that PPI is no longer a money maker....

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        They already switched to scamming people for marriage allowance and flat rate job expenses.

  7. Woodnag

    FB and GDPR

    See https://noyb.eu/en/open-letter to understand that FB just ignores GDPR, with help from Ireland.

  8. DerekCurrie
    FAIL

    Another App That Can Stop FAILing

    There are a few apps that can't stop tripping over their own security failures, over and over and over again. Whatsapp is one of them. I cringe when people ask me to chat using WhatsApp. I only keep the thing on my computer to make them happy. Otherwise it would join my list of verboten apps. The best current alternative is still Signal.

    Another popular problem app:

    Zoom. User be wary.

    On Mac, FaceTime is the superior alternative.

    On Windows, the battle for best alternative limps onward.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Another App That Can Stop FAILing

      "I only keep the thing on my computer"

      Seeing as WhatsApp works via a mobile number and is not a functioning Windows or Linux app without tethering to a phone running the app, this is a blatant lie.

      1. John McCallum

        Re: Another App That Can Stop FAILing

        All "smart" phones could legitimately be called "pocket" computers.

      2. illiad

        Re: Another App That Can Stop FAILing

        "I only keep the thing on my computer" er no, you CAN use it on a PC.. Its called 'bluestacks' and it is a PC based Android emulator :)

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Another App That Can Stop FAILing

          Why didn't you say that originally?

      3. Ken Hagan Gold badge

        Re: Another App That Can Stop FAILing

        The text you quote does not exclude the possibility of the OP keeping the app on a phone, too, so "blatant lie" is a little strong.

    2. eionmac

      Re: Another App That Can Stop FAILing

      On Windows or Linux (in any browser) meet.jit.si ?

  9. Winkypop Silver badge
    FAIL

    The true cost of using these "free apps"

    Your identity, freedom, integrity, security and more...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

      "identity, freedom, integrity, security and more..."

      Identity: I'm nobody special. You obviously can't mean actual proper full on credit card based ID theft. So nothing that can hurt me.

      Freedom: Trust me, if my freedom is at stake, my lawyer wife can help. What are you afraid of, house arrest? Lmao

      Integrity: For someone insulting millions of people over an app, with bogeyman scare stories, I'm not sure I'm the one whose integrity is at stake..

      Security: like what. See above, if you're talking credit card numbers I'm worried but WhatsApp don't have it. And if my nudes leak - who cares, another white guy's penis, get over yourself. Personally you'll remain safe. Nobody is going to take your thumbs over WhatsApp.

      Go on. Humour me. Tell me the worst case scenarios for each of these aspects.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

        Humour me. Tell me the worst case scenarios for each of these aspects.

        Well, if I used your Identity to post an inflammatory racist rant in your name, perhaps tag it with "#BlackLivesDontMatter", I suspect you'd soon have concerns about your Freedom, your reputation (speaks to Integrity) and your Security.

        1. This post has been deleted by its author

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

          Answer the question without picking on me personally. That's whataboutery

        3. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

          Thank you for semi-answering seriously.

          So I ask. What would befall me? Don't just say "concerns". Bring it the fuck on. Get gruesome, inform me. The Lot.

          Scare me. But please, don't be nebulous.

      2. biribenda
        Coat

        Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

        So that is why you are posting anonymously ? Nothing to hide, right ?

        1. illiad

          Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

          except my identity... :P :) I do not use my real name anywhere, so if anyone I know sees it, I have plausible deniability ...

          you haven't seen me, RIGHT??? :D

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

            More whataboutery.

            You're the third person to avoid the question. That's why I'm anon - to trick you

            I'm anon yet you go after me. And my questions are not answered.

            Heh I think I've won

            Seriously, I didn't lay out my objections for any reason than I want answers.

            But if you make it personal you lose. Try again.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

          If I posted with my real name you'd insult me.

          You're even insulting me anon.

          Yet the questions go unanswered. I think I win.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

        I'm still fucking waiting.

        Imagine I'm whatever you like, but I want someone, Anyone, to look at the question and delineate the risks for each of the sectors.

        I'm sorry if I upset anybody by merely asking questions. Honestly.

        But that's why I'm AC. I saw it coming. You don't like your views challenged.

        You're insecure. Me? Maybe I'm awful too. I don't deny I have issues.

        But scaremongering? Fuck off.

        I have sisters, my wife, my kids on WhatsApp. By extension, the OP reckons they should expect to be ripped off and die or..

        Or..

        See, that's my trouble. What are you scared of? That's not a loaded question it's an honest one.

        Yet instead of answers I get abused personally. And you wonder why I'm anon. Gee, I fucking wonder. You think I'm stupid? Well, if I used my real name, you'd be even worse.

        And the questions would not be answered.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

      Winkypop.

      Stop avoiding my questions and answer them without trying to abuse me personally.

      You've had long enough...

      1. MrMerrymaker Bronze badge

        Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

        Don't take this the wrong way (which seems easily done) but you could fare to be a wee bit less combative!! Pre-emptive sorry for the selfie reply you're bound to give. Please & Thanks go a long way.

        Though I'd also like an answer to the worst-case-scenario questions. I've bought Mary Jane over WhatsApp for years and I'm free.

        And though you phrased it very spikily, you may have a smidgen of a point with the ol' "insulting every WhatsApp user' thing. I support a football team who use it. My MP uses it (I know, I know) and my Labour MP uses it..

        So, reluctantly, I echo the request for why this makes you a bad / gullible person.

        Though do stop being so arrogant... You catch bees with honey.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: The true cost of using these "free apps"

        "Please answer without abusing me personally" gets a down vote

        Yeah, I'm talking to nice people here alright...

  10. dogcatcher

    WhatsApp has brains??

    “All WhatsApp users, including businesses, can block unwanted messages with the tap of a button.”

    Which button would that be? And how does WhatsApp tell that a message on its way to me is wanted or not?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: WhatsApp has brains??

      Don't ask questions, you get abused, or ignored.

      You'd think a real answer would surface, but that would mean somebody had one.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: WhatsApp has brains??

        Oof this is getting nasty! Let's just answer.

        I'm DYING FOR a reason to sling to my friends to stop using Zuckerbergs' various shite...

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: WhatsApp has brains??

          And a day later nobody can answer.

          Scuse me but I'm chalking this one up as a victory.

          1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

            Re: WhatsApp has brains??

            JAACT* - good to see its going hungry.

            *Just another AC troll

            1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

              Re: WhatsApp has brains??

              Sorry - ran out of time to edit my post. I wanted to address your question seriously.

              The answer is that I don't know, because I am not minded to screw people over. However, there are lots of people who are. For example, the first telephone suppliers and owners had no concept of the potential for abuse that scum rapidly jumped on. Information is power, and it can be used against you. Reducing the attack surface is the best defence, but companies like Facebook take away options do that (usually deliberately, but in this case accidentally).

    2. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: WhatsApp has brains??

      >Which button would that be?

      I think they are referring to the 'Block' option available under the three vertical dots icon in messages from individual numbers.

  11. YetAnotherJoeBlow

    I wonder

    I find it unbelievably depressing everytime freshman year mistakes are now the rule of thumb. Have they ever heard of format preserving encryption - or even a simple hash?

    Computer Science has been dumbed down to the extent of being equivalent to a trade school. You can learn how to write PC program comments but not writing good code itself. Pathetic.

  12. chivo243 Silver badge

    use it for work

    Yes, there is a whatsapp group for work. I blocked access to the address book\contacts when asked for access.

  13. dch0ar
    Thumb Down

    Security Question

    Everyone accuses Whatsapp of slurping information but has no concrete examples. Just like the Huawei problem where it is supposed that information could be tapped but there is no published evidence.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020