back to article Smartphones, PCs, and now wearables... Coronavirus wrecks another corner of tech

Sales of wearable tech are estimated to slow in 2020 as consumers slam the brakes on non-essential spending. ABI Research is expecting 27 million fewer units sold against earlier forecasts, for a total of 254 million. That figure still represents 5 per cent growth against 2019's stats, when 241 million wearables were bought. …

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  3. Pascal Monett Silver badge
    Stop

    "a healthcare necessity"

    Are you kidding me ?

    If you wake yourself up in the middle of the night to check your ECG monitor and verify your oxygen levels, you're doing worse than someone who is getting a good night's sleep.

    Medical attention should be regulated by a doctor who knows what he's doing, not by some company who feeds on the Munchhausen syndrome.

  4. big_D Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Shock...

    Situation making us question frivolous spending causing the market for frivolous goods to shrink, who'd a thunk it?

    Wearables aren't an essential product. If you already have one and are facing financial realities, you probably won't fork out for a new one at the current time. If you don't already have one, you probably don't need one at the current time, there are better things to spend money on.

    The same goes for all luxury and frivolous goods, like smartphones, I replaced mine as Corona hit. I went to the Amazon site with the thought of cancelling the purchase, but it had already been dispatched (3 days earlier than Samsung had announced). I spent the first 2 weeks humming and hawing about whether to send it back or not. If I hadn't already received it as Corona broke, I certainly wouldn't have upgraded my old phone this year.

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