back to article Like other tech giants, Netflix gets govt takedown demands – and impressively, none of them involve Adam Sandler

Netflix has posted its first-ever report into what sort of content governments have asked the streaming giant to pull from its service. The Blockbuster-killer's Environmental Social Governance Report [PDF] includes, among other things, details on all of the demands Netflix has had to yank content from localized versions of its …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Surely somewhere in this big old planet of ours Netflix has the streaming rights to Battlefield Earth. That must have been worthy of a takedown or at the least a total shutdown of the internet in said country until Neflix complied with the request to save it's citizens of the horror.

    1. Robert Grant Silver badge

      You can see Battlefield Earth on Netflix

      You just need to VPN into the Psychlo home world.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: You can see Battlefield Earth on Netflix

        *walks up and starts laughing for no reason*

        Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

  2. jake Silver badge

    How did I know ...

    ... from the headline alone, I knew Saudi Arabia and Singapore would be on the list.

    Sadly, I was right. It's 2020 here, what year is it in those countries?

    1. JimJimmyJimson

      Re: How did I know ...

      Fair enough to criticise the backwards state of Saudi Arabia, but Singapore has managed to maintain a high degree of social cohesion, despite a very diverse and multicultural population.

      One of the ways they have done this is to carefully manage anything that offends religion. Singapore doesn't care what religion you are - they just know (as has been demonstrated in many other places) that when you get friction caused by perceived slights to a deity/messiah/prophet/floating carbohydrate based entity that it can cause massive unrest. So play nice and keep your opinions to yourself.

      If only other countries managed this so well...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How did I know ...

        Don't worry. The UK will soon have Draconian Employment Laws to match those of Singapore.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How did I know ...

        I think I'd rather live in a world that doesn't care what religion you are, but the rest of society doesn't have to pander to your medieval sensibilities.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How did I know ...

        If a country censors, it hard to know if their image of "social cohesion" is real either.

        How do you know if that hasn't been censored from reporting?

        It could be argued in addition to "carefully manage anything that offends religion" they also "carefully manage anything that criticises or negatively portrays the state"

      4. IGotOut Silver badge

        Re: How did I know ...

        @JimJimmyJohnson

        "in 2018, Singapore was ranked 151st out of 180 nations by Reporters Without Borders in the Worldwide Press Freedom Index. Freedom in the World scored Singapore 4 out of 7 for political freedom, and 4 out of 7 for civil liberties (where 1 is the most free)...."

        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Singapore

      5. First Light Bronze badge

        Re: How did I know ...

        A law just came into effect in Singapore (October 2019) requiring social media companies to accept government labeling of various news pieces as "fake news." I love visiting Singapore, however I also acknowledge that the Republic's version of civil liberties is not one I am comfortable with.

      6. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How did I know ...

        You missed out the IPU. Are you trivialising her followers?

  3. Bloodbeastterror

    Adam Sandler...

    How apt that the writer chooses him. The Mark of Quality. One that I avoid at all costs. I gave him the benefit of the doubt with Uncut Gems because of the rave reviews, but alas, as with all other Sandler films, it stinks like a skunk.

    1. Sandtitz Silver badge
      Thumb Up

      Re: Adam Sandler...

      Punch-Drunk Love is a very good film.

      Despite of Adam Richard Sandler.

    2. keith_w Bronze badge

      Re: Adam Sandler...

      I usually hate Adam Sandler movies. I could not watch past the first 5 minutes of Ridiculous 6, but I also have to admit that i loved Murder Mystery. Possibly because of Jennifer Anniston.

  4. OzBob

    The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

    I still have my DVD copy (and have ripped it for backup just in case). Given that local celebrity Mike King goes up and down the country talking to schoolkids about suicide and why not to do it, it seems incongruous that they would block the viewing of it. But then again, NZ is full of Mary Whitehouse like busybodies who think us proles are not equipped to manage our own thoughts and emotions and they know best (Peter Ellis, anyone?)

    1. 1752
      Thumb Up

      Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

      Watched The Bridge when it was on 2006. Thought it was superb and brillant documentary.

    2. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

      Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

      It could be that New Zealand have rules about how you show that kind of content? I don’t think the Beeb would show or broadcast anything focusing on suicide that didn’t have warnings and links to helplines and information. But I think in the UK all that stuff is voluntary and the main broadcasters all do it.

      Also, Netflix isn’t regulated by Ofcom in this country, because they don’t broadcast. And Parliament hasn’t caught up with streaming-only media yet.

      1. katrinab Silver badge

        Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

        Netflix is regulated as a video on demand service

        https://www.ofcom.org.uk/tv-radio-and-on-demand/advice-for-consumers/television/video-on-demand

        1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

          Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

          Or it has some public body that automatically stamps any public objection.

          Here in stalinesque Canada, dire straits Money for Nothing was banned because one person wrote in objecting to the 'that little faggot got his own jet airplane' line.

          1. Alistair Silver badge
            Windows

            Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

            @YAAC:

            Uuuuhm. It didn't get a crapton of airplay in I think the first week after the album was released, but certainly both CHUM and Q107 were playing the hell out of it later that month. I've no idea why you think it got banned.

            1. jake Silver badge

              Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

              Turns out that after a single complaint by some luser in Newfoundland (who apparently missed the day in school where they taught that the meaning of words can change according to the context in which they are used), The Canadian Broadcast Standards Council decided that it was "unsuitable for airplay" on private radio stations. This happened in 2011, over a quarter century after the song hit #1 in the Canadian charts. Naturally, most stations ignored the "ban". The CBSC later changed their tune to make it advisory, allowing stations to make up their own minds.

              1. keith_w Bronze badge

                Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

                "Naturally, most stations ignored the "ban". "

                No they didn't, they switched to the non "little faggot" version.

            2. This post has been deleted by its author

        2. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

          Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

          katrinab,

          Yup. Ofcom have taken over all regulation from ATVOD now, which I hadn't realised. However they don't regulate them in the same way as terrestrial telly. They don't have any power over editorial content, such as TV news having to be impartial and content of other programs.

          Except to think of the children, so age verification of 18 rated films, and some control of content that might harm young people (which suicide-related materials could be counted under). Other than that they regulate advertising and material "likely to promote hate".

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The Bridge documentary is an awesome piece of film

      In kiwi land they have a spin off of Netflix...they call it Nitflux.

      They've been known to sit on each others dicks with their fush n chups and watch some Nitflux.

      Nitflux and Chull they call it.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    officials with the Commission for Youth Protection demanded that "Night of the Living Dead"

    it would be valuable to see the Fuehrer protesting about the Commission's request (WHAT?! I'M NOT DEAD!, etc.) Oh well.

    1. MrDamage

      Re: officials with the Commission for Youth Protection demanded that "Night of the Living Dead"

      From memory, it was a scene in the remake which had some Nazi parapheanlia on the walls that caused the objection, due to their strict anti-Nazi laws. Cut the scene, and the rest of the film was cleared.

  6. Muscleguy Silver badge

    I think Netflix should be proud of this list in much the same way that any person/group who has a song banned on the BBC is. Such as Crowded House’s Six Months on a Leaky Boat due to its prissy desire not to offend the troops on the way to the Falklands despite the fact the troops loved the song and anyway it’s an allegory for a dodgy relationship innit?

    1. Wellyboot Silver badge

      Those would be the same troops singing 'Don't cry for me Argentina'...

    2. GerryMC

      Six Months on a Leaky Boat was by Split Enz, not Crowded House. Mind you both bands featured Neil Finn

  7. Wellyboot Silver badge

    Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

    It's only notorious to those that oppose the position, most Singaporeans I would suspect don't, given that it's a well run parliamentary republic.

    For example, "The notorious 'Free at the point of delivery' position taken by the NHS" would be a line I'd expect to appear from within any US healthcare company board meeting (They'd gut their granny to take a bite out of the NHS budget) but not from anyone actually living in the UK who believe they benefit from it.

    1. werdsmith Silver badge

      Re: Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

      NHS LINE IS “ free for everyone at the point of delivery”.

      Meaning citizens of the nation regardless of whether they are unemployed and not paying any or much towards it or are paying.

      1. Roj Blake

        Re: Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

        Free at the point of delivery - unless you don't qualify for free prescriptions, free dentistry, etc

        1. Wellyboot Silver badge
          Facepalm

          Re: Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

          Oh yes, that's true, My father would have had to pay the few quid for the tablets he needed while recovering from his triple bypass op carried out by an expert NHS surgical team costing well into five figures.

          1. heyrick Silver badge

            Re: Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

            "from his triple bypass op carried out"

            And your point is?

            Or, to put it another way, over here in France the medical service is not "free". A visit to the doctor costs about €25 (your top up later refunds it). Many common medications are not free (your top up may or may not pay). Things such as plasters and supports are not covered.

            The Sécu (like the NHS) will cover people in the system for 70%. You need a top up for the rest. This can be cheap of you're an employee of a company and get it from there, up to hideously expensive if you're a retiree. As such, medical care in France is not "free".

            However, there are exemptions for major issues (Affection Longue Durée) where one is completely covered, plus additional things such as transport to and from treatment and many medications not normally covered. Ailments such as cancer, heart bypass surgery...

            1. Wellyboot Silver badge

              Re: Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

              My point, Don't argue over the peanuts (people in work paying for NHS prescriptions) when expensive non-emergency procedures are always performed at zero cost to the patient unlike in the US where no cashgenerally means no op.

        2. Avatar of They
          Meh

          Re: Singapore's notoriously strict anti-drug stance.

          But the Doctors appointment to get the prescription is free. If it is emergency, you get it. As you don't pay for prescriptions in an ambulance etc.

  8. foxyshadis

    FTFY

    "Americans and Brits will be happy to know that none of the requests came from their governments, so Netflix the MPAA and TV networks walling their content into their own streaming services have had full control over what you do and don't see in those countries."

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