back to article The Nokia 3.2 is a phone your nan will love: One camera's more than enough, darling

Released halfway through last year, the Nokia 3.2 ain't no spring chicken but you should pay that no mind, because, despite being on the market for a while, this budget blower is not a waste of money. At the time of writing, you can pick up a handset on Amazon for £95. That places it in the very entry-level sector of the …

  1. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    Sorry, this doesn't change my mind

    When I retire (in 15 years), I will ditch the bloody smartphone and get a plumb-stupid phone with keys my fingers can use and a battery life measured in fortnights.

    1. Ken 16 Silver badge
      Big Brother

      Re: Sorry, this doesn't change my mind

      15 years from now, won't be getting the brain stem implant with audio and optic nerve feed like everyone else? That's the only way to take advantage of 27G mobile network speeds.

      1. Captain Scarlet Silver badge
        Alien

        Re: Sorry, this doesn't change my mind

        15 years from now, I will just use my IRC Client.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: 15 years from now

          I'll be probably dead and stop worrying whether my current OS is 2 years behind the latest, or 10.

        2. Bronek Kozicki
          Paris Hilton

          Re: Sorry, this doesn't change my mind

          ... on a smartphone, or a laptop, or using direct brain-machine interface?

    2. Horridbloke

      Re: Sorry, this doesn't change my mind

      If smartphones are annoying you that badly then why wait? Just buy one of the many dumb phones available and use that instead. You could probably sort it out during this week's grocery shop.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

    Really? I generally expect to keep a phone for about 5 years (including the pre-smart era ones).

    Edited to add: In fact, two years will only get you to the end of a two year, pay-monthly contract.

    1. big_D Silver badge

      Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

      Yep, my extended family are just starting to replace their Galaxy S3 minis...

      1. Blackjack Silver badge

        Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

        I replaced mine last year because WhatsApp and Signal no longer run on it.

        1. big_D Silver badge

          Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

          Yep, WhatsApp seems to be the driving force for upgrades for the older Android handsets as well as Windows Phone.

          1. TheRealRoland
            Unhappy

            Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

            In the US the Chase banking app also caused problems. My Blackberry Passport was working fine, until Chase said 'nu-uh, not on this Android'. So i got a KeyOne, which is now also out of luck on Android updates.

            So yeah, that StrandHogg thing - reality. Got infected with that (sympton was that i saw an app named 'Apps' that would reappear after deleting and rebooting the phone).

            Had to wipe clean my handset to get rid of it :-(

            And absolutely no idea what site i visited to get it infected.

          2. DropBear

            Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

            Well that explains why I'm not thinking about upgrading my Galaxy S2 - I'm not using Whatsapp...

    2. lybad

      Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

      To be honest, a lot of the phone companies are trying to push three year contracts, some for the SIM part, but mainly for the handsets.

    3. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese

      Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

      Indeed. I think the lifespan of a phone tends to be dictated largely by battery health (particularly in these days of sealed-in batteries), and this is influenced mostly by the number of drain/charge cycles.

      For a typical modern smartphone that means that the battery will be pretty much fagged-out after a couple of years. A phone like this Nokia will be getting recharged less frequently, so time taken to reach a battery-defeating number of recharges ought to be far longer than two years.

      1. Rameses Niblick the Third Kerplunk Kerplunk Whoops Where's My Thribble?

        Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

        For a typical modern smartphone that means that the battery will be pretty much fagged-out after a couple of years.

        I beg to differ. My Huawei Honor 9 is now just off two years old (it's 22 months old to be precise) and it still lasts the thick end of two working days between charges and I've not exactly been very kind to the battery. It gets used as a SatNav whenever I travel long distances and it will be plugged in to power the whole time. It's been used as a media player during holidays away in the countryside, again plugged in the whole time.

        I appreciate that I might have just been very lucky with the battery I got, but I am seeing battery degradation being less of an issue.

        Still wouldn't buy a second hand phone though.

        1. BebopWeBop Silver badge

          Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

          Actually my iPhone 8 and my partners 5s are still both going strong - 2 and 5 years old and both reporting well over 80% battery capacity.

        2. big_D Silver badge

          Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

          My Mate 10 Pro still lasts a couple of days, easily.

          My colleague has a booming business replacing batteries in older smartphones. ~50€ for a replacement iPhone battery compared to ~840€ for a new iPhone 11 Pro, Samsung etc. are even cheaper. People are just holding onto them longer and longer, as they see no benefit to upgrading.

        3. This post has been deleted by its author

        4. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese

          Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

          It gets used as a SatNav whenever I travel long distances and it will be plugged in to power the whole time.

          It's been used as a media player during holidays away in the countryside, again plugged in the whole time.

          You're keeping it plugged in - that'll be why the battery is still quite healthy. What really hinders battery performance is allowing it to drain and then charging back up to 100%. Memory effect isn't an issue with modern batteries thankfully, but they can still only stand being drained & recharged so many times.

          I travel quite a lot so most days my phone is running on battery all day and then gets recharged over night. With my usage pattern, a new phone might still be at 30% charge at the end of the day...once it get's to 2-years-old it could be struggling to be 10% by bedtime.

        5. jason 7

          Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

          Battery husbandry is vital!

          I took note of some articles on battery life and have stopped charging over night and charging to 100%.

          Once the phone gets to 90% I unplug it.

          The result? Well my nearly 18 month old Huawei Mate 10 Pro is still at 93% battery health. Lost about 300mAh.

          So stop leaving your phone and tablet hooked up for hours on full charge.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

            So stop leaving your phone and tablet hooked up for hours on full charge.

            The charging circuitry in phones is more sophisticated than that. It stops supplying when 100% is reached. I leave my phones/tablets connected to the mains whenever possible, including overnight and I have devices the best part of a decade old which still hold a charge just fine.

            1. jason 7

              Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

              It's the keeping it at 100% that is a major part of the problem.

              So unplug it.

              But it's your battery at the end of the day...

              1. seanf

                Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

                Current battery technology IS smarter. You don't need to disconnect before 100% because the battery system SW will cut charging at ~90%. It just displays 100% to key us warm verticals happy.

                1. jason 7

                  Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

                  Or I can simply unplug it rather than trusting the 'technology'...cos that always works as intended.

                  1. seanf

                    Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

                    Yes you can simply unplug it - but you don't actually need to. Take the risk and live that little bit more.

                2. Anonymous Coward
                  Anonymous Coward

                  Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

                  90+% of lenovo laptop battery charging issue is due to exactly that type of software. Also, battery software it is not reliable when the device is turned off or with a different operating system. Current battery technology is not much smarter than a few years ago.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

            Actually, your phone is now effectvely at 83%, because you're only charging to 90% of your new capacity.

            4000 mAh at 93% after 18 months = 3720 mAh. You charge to 90% of your new "full" = 3348 mAh. 3348/4000 = 83.7%

            Why complicate things? Leave your phone plugged in when charging, charge to 100% all the time, and I bet you'd have more than 3348 mAh after 18 months.

            1. jason 7

              Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

              Yeah I guess I can join all those that leave their phones charging over night, complaining that after two years their 'battery doesn't last as long as it used to!"

    4. Lazlo Woodbine

      Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

      Two years of Android updates, the phone won't immediately die the next day.

      1. big_D Silver badge

        Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

        No, but a month later, no security updates, so it is a big risk to allow it to connect to the Internet...

        1. jason 7

          Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

          No it isn't.

          Android update issues is just fodder for IT journos with nothing to write about that day.

          Every month or two we get another Android Apocalypse warning and...nothing happens.

          Hyperbole in most cases.

          1. TheRealRoland
            Unhappy

            Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

            Nope. StrandHogg is real.

            1. jason 7

              Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

              And so were the 48 previous 'Android Apocalypse' Vulnerabilities we have read about over the past 8 years or so.

              But...tumbleweed...

              It's mostly IT press click hype.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        the phone won't immediately die the next day

        That's true; the really killer is when apps no longer support the OS.

        1. dajames Silver badge

          Re: the phone won't immediately die the next day

          the really killer is when apps no longer support the OS.

          Apps don't support an OS, the OS supports the apps. That's its job.

          You're talking about when the apps are updated and are no longer supported BY the OS.

          This does eventually happen, but the period of guaranteed security updates will expire much sooner.

    5. johnfbw

      Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

      15 years ago I remember how we had to check the requirements on any software (or game) to make sure we could run. If the computer was older than 9 months for had no chance of running the latest games. Today I have a computer that is mainly 10 years old (albeit with a new graphic card, CPU and SSD) and no intention to change for a while. Phones will get there - eventually

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Is that a bit like...

        "I've had this broom for 20 years. It's only had five new heads and two shafts"?

        1. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
          Coat

          Re: Is that a bit like...

          Time to pull the trigger on it then.

          Sorry - Not Sorry.

          1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

            Re: Is that a bit like...

            "Sorry - Not Sorry."

            Schrödingers Broom?

        2. DropBear

          Re: Is that a bit like...

          False equivalence. That quote is valid when almost or indeed all components of something have been gradually replaced. When about half of it stayed the same it's just called an upgraded computer...

    6. tfewster Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

      Released halfway through last year...guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades.

      So if you buy one now, you'll get 18 months of support?

      1. vmistery

        Re: "longevity ... guaranteeing two years of software updates and upgrades"

        It’s an Android one phone so you will get 2 years of OS updates from release and a further one year of security updates. So if you buy now iyou have 2 years and a few months.

  3. Calum Morrison

    Eh?

    By one camera, you actually mean two? One front and one rear facing.

    1. Lazlo Woodbine

      Re: Eh?

      But only one on each face, unlike the 3 on the back of my phone...

      1. Calum Morrison

        Re: Eh?

        Yes, but by any measurement, it's still two.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Eh?

          Lazo must be a bean counter :-)

          1. JDX Gold badge

            Re: Eh?

            2 lenses on one side == one camera shirley?

  4. 0laf Silver badge
    Facepalm

    So in effect we're once again looking at throwing away a physically working device because a supplier won't support the software. It's the ultimate in planned obsolescence isn't it. They even tell you when you'll have to throw it away.

    Phones, TVs, all manner of IOT shite and soon cars, all heading to the skip because of unsupported software not physical wear and tear.

    Greta will be greetin'. And I doubt this will be acceptable practice for much longer with the current backlash against plastic waste in general.

    1. Sartori

      I know plenty of people still using phones long after they last received any kind of update, quite happily too. It only tends to be when the battery becomes pretty useless (or they drop/lose/have it stolen) that they get rid of them. If the battery was user replaceable then I'm sure they'd have used the phones for much longer still. If we're talking green credentials, then I think non-user replaceable batteries is more of a concern than software updates for most people.

      1. jason 7

        Indeed, Android insecurity from lack of updates is a overhyped issue.

        Folks that use a 3-4+ year old phone are not the types generally downloading every silly app from the store willynilly.

        It's the muppets with the latest and greatest that worry me more.

      2. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese

        To be honest, my phone has been nagging me for months that the new version of Android is available and it wants to update. I just keep dismissing the notification. Phone runs fine as it is - I don't want to risk updating the OS and some application(s) deciding to break, or the whole phone slowing down because the latest OS expects more up-to-date hardware and generally makes my older phone run more slowly.

        Yes, I'm probably taking a risk by not getting the security patches, but on balance I trust myself to use web/email responsibly to reduce the risk, and just keep using my phone as I always have.

        YMMV

  5. BebopWeBop Silver badge
    Pirate

    My 83 yr old mum still loves her Windows phone (a Nokia I believe) - it was bad enough getting her to accept it, I shudder to think what the ructions will be when it has to be replaced.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Yes. Our boss's wife (they are both over 80) had to give up her Nokia 830 over Christmas, she has been moaning ever since, about her new iPhone 8 and how it isn't nearly as good as her old Nokia.

    2. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

      Yup. Mum's 80 and had to give up her trusty Lumia 630 a few months ago. On which I had to offer almost no support after I set it up and showed her how to use it. I thought I'd got her Huawei P20 Lite set up quite well too - though it took too many hours (I hate setting up Droids) - and she was happy with it at first. But she's been complaining about it lately. Problems with Bluetooth, but then who hasn't had those...

      But also while she was on holiday Huawei's text app managed to take over as default and kick out the standard one. Thus convincing her she'd got a virus and planting that seed of doubt about the reliability of the new shiny.

      I'd normally blame a pushy Huawei app, they've got copies of all the standard Google versions, presumably so they can have all your data instead - and they're sometimes hard to tell from the real thing, and they've tucked the Google ones away in a folder somewhere.

      But despite her claims of innocence I still supsect Mum fell for agreeing to a "would you like me to be the default app" pop-up.

      I'm also an ex Windows Phone user now, since the apps all started dying. Changed mine over to a 'Droid at Christmas. I'm really appreciating a 6" screen over a 4" one - and the apps I couldn't previously have. But it's hours of work trying to get the settings you want, and then more work policing them so that some scumbag doesn't manage to overrule a change you've chosen to make - for whatever reason they see fit. My iPad does this a bit (Apple always re-enable Bluetooth with every update for example) - but what with Google and Huawei and half the app's programmers thinking they know what's best for me or just wanting to know me better without asking... It's a bit annoying.

      It's such a shame that Google's monopoly abuse was able to kill off Blackberry, Windows Phone and WebOS. Aided by some pisspoor decisions from the companies in question themselves of course...

      1. 's water music
        Holmes

        But also while she was on holiday Huawei's text app managed to take over as default and kick out the standard one. ...I'd normally blame a pushy Huawei app, they've got copies of all the standard Google versions, presumably so they can have all your data instead ...But despite her claims of innocence I still supsect Mum fell for agreeing to a "would you like me to be the default app" pop-up.

        My ageing Huawei Ascend G7 (coming up to five years old, battery still fine thanks) rebooted into safe mode the other day (not sure if it was a pocket press of the power button or a random crash, reboot) and once I retsarted back into normal mode I noticed that messaging had defaulted back to the Huawei app and the NFC payment provider had done the same. No drama to switch them back but your mum might be at risk of a miscarriage of justice after all.

        Hopefully he will ensure due process is followed ----------------------->

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Wow, *two* years?

    I seem to remember all the Apple-haters going on about iPhones and 'planned obsolescence'.

    I just checked https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPhone#History_and_availability, and other than the first few iPhone models (which were only supported for just over 2 years after release), everything else has had a minimum supported life of 2 years (if you happened to buy a model just as it was being discontinued) with the longest supported life being nearly 6 years (e.g. if you bought an iPhone 5S at release in 2013 and stuck with it until it's final iOS update in December 2019).

    The longest-lived Google-manufactured phone seems to have been the Nexus 5x, which was only supported from October 2015 to December 2018 (just over three years, so only a bit better than the worst-supported of the Apple phones). I don't think any of the third-party hardware manufacturers for Android phones has provided support for any longer than that (is that even possible?)

    Is this an argument for paying the 'Apple premium' and buying a more expensive phone, but keeping it for longer? Personally, I buy a new iPhone every 2 or 3 years, and then pass it on to a family member - who then gets a usable phone for free, and can get another 2 or 3 years use out of it.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Wow, *two* years?

      "Personally, I buy a new iPhone every 2 or 3 years, and then pass it on to a family member - who then gets a usable phone for free, and can get another 2 or 3 years use out of it."

      Only because you're too rich. I'd be able to buy the new 1+ KE iphone every six months easily, but it is so ridiculous and would so badly reflect on my kids, I never even owned one ...

      The prices of iPhones and everything Apple is doing today is simply ridiculous.

      But anyhow, good to see an El Reg article about a very affordable phone, rather than what we see all too often: hacks in tears with a phone equipped with 64 cams, 1TB storage, ofc a single SIM slot, a 200 Mpixels cam, a glass screen made of strontium and xenon for whatever reason, for a cool 2 000 E !

      I happen to have a Nokia 7.1 from last year and it's the best piece of kit I've ever purchased. And yes, the battery still lasts 2 days of normal use.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Wow, *two* years?

        a phone equipped with 64 cams, 1TB storage, ofc a single SIM slot, a 200 Mpixels cam, a glass screen made of strontium and xenon for whatever reason, for a cool 2 000 E

        Sounds awesome! If it's available in rose gold, then I'll take two.

        1. hopkinse

          Re: Wow, *two* years?

          Soon to be available on escobarinc.com :-)

  7. phuzz Silver badge
    Unhappy

    Alas, there's no factory method to unlock the bootloader, so there's no (easy) way of moving to a custom ROM after the two years of support have ended.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Android landfill is a disgrace

    Arguably, the most compelling feature is that it will receive prompt security updates for the next couple of years. As most people familiar with the Android ecosystem will know, that is a rare thing indeed.

    Say what you want about Apple, but my iPhone SE, released in March 2016, will continue to receive full support until iOS 14 gets released some time next September.

    I think manufacturers should be forced to guarantee security updates for at least 5 years, purely on environmental grounds.

    1. bengoey49

      Re: Android landfill is a disgrace

      Bought the original small Google Pixel November 2016 , this year 2020 no more software updates. Last year when I was in the US I bought a used iPhone SE 32GB for $170, it was in like new condition with battery health at 100% , The SE was launched in March 2016 before the Pixel and still has software updates this year at least , may be next year. I use the SE as a back up phone and it is my first iPhone.

      After many years using Blackberry and Android phones I have decided late last year that if I buy a new phone it has to be an iPhone as unless you buy the top of the range of iPhones ( Pro and Pro Max ) in the long run it is in fact cheaper despite the fact that in general iPhones are expensive. iphone 11 is probably going to be my next phone or the rumoured SE2. Bye bye Androids.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Android landfill is a disgrace

        When it comes time to buy that iPhone 11, I suggest you have a look at giffgaff's website. They seem to have very competitive prices for new and used unlocked iPhones. I bought my SE 32 GB new in Nov 2017 for £220 from them.

  9. legless82

    2 years?

    Nearly 3 and a half years ago, I bought a cheap (by the standards of similarly-specced devices) OnePlus 3T, which was delivered on Android Marshmallow. OnePlus pushed subsequent OS updates to Nougat and Pie when they were released, and they released Android Oreo for it about 6 months ago. It's still continuing to get security-related patch releases even now, almost 3 years after production stopped.

    If a small (by the standards of the other players in the market) Chinese firm can do this, why can't everybody else?

    1. legless82

      Re: 2 years?

      Sorry - got Oreo and Pie the wrong way around - it's on Pie at the moment with a recent security patch level,

      1. paulll

        Re: 2 years?

        "Sorry - got Oreo and Pie the wrong way around"

        Hmm. If only there were some way to differentiate between versions, that wasn't susceptible to confusion like that. Hopefully somebody has some top minds working on this.

  10. myhandler

    Nokia 7.1 is available *new* online for £120 - it must be unsold stock but meh. A little older than this but much better spec all round - works for me.

  11. baud

    Android updates

    Are Android updates that important? I mean I can't remember the last time I updated my phone (Galaxy 5, hand-me-down from my dad a few years ago), the current version is something like 6, but I don't have any issue using it, mostly for browsing, text, calls and WhatsApp.

    Regarding battery life, the original had degraded to less than a day, but buying a new one didn't change much.

    1. DropBear

      Re: Android updates

      I'd just like to mention that buying "new" batteries can be quite a misleading endeavour - original batteries tend to get made only for a short time after a model is released, and you can find yourself buying batteries for a five years old phone that were actually manufactured... four years ago (or indeed almost 7-8 years ago, for a phone like my S2) - and you'll only realise this if you take the time to look up the manufacturers date code scheme and decode the gibberish on your "new" battery (which will be totally different than the one on the photo of the listing). They may technically be "new" but they've been sitting on a shelf for years, losing a lot of their capacity before even getting sold. Of course, non-original batteries also exist, but there you really have no idea what actually is inside anywhere from rated capacity down to wet sand...

      1. baud

        Re: Android updates

        Ah, thank you for the explanation, it explains why the improvement wasn't that big.

  12. Fat_Tony

    Storage

    "And while that doesn't sound like a lot – and it isn't – it's worth remembering that this phone is targeted at casual users who are unlikely to accumulate mountains of apps."

    Although the target market won't use apps, they're demons for storage usage. My sister in law sends about 70 photos a week and several videos of her kids via whatsapp. While I happily delete them, usually without looking at them, the grandparents keep them all. When they run out of space they hate deleting anything, never mind photos of the grandkids.

    While it's not a big deal (it doesn't take long to get another load of photos), it does show storage is a bit of a consideration.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Storage

      "My sister in law sends about 70 photos a week and several videos of her kids via whatsapp."

      We seem to have the same sis in law :) Also, in about one month, her phone is full regardless of internal storage size, then my brother has to remove 1000+ pics from it ...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Storage

      I had a similar issue with my mum recently. She had a pathetically sized 16GB iPhone 6s which she couldn’t install updates on because of all the photos and videos of the grandkids on. So I checked how much space I was using on my 6s, 8GB... so we did a swap and she’s now on a 128GB. Just to clarify I am that guy though who streams music and has a dedicated camera so I am probably a bit unusual.

  13. Grunchy

    I updated to iPhone SE

    Look, you can get em practically free, plus you can snap on a FLIR One for next to nothing. It WORKS, man. I’m surfing here on it at this very moment in fact. And did I mention the two actual cameras?

    I sincerely use freephoneline.ca and a PAP2T, no foolin! You dopes are paying 95£? For Finnish tech?!

    1. ecarlseen

      Re: I updated to iPhone SE

      You're assuming that the point is to have a highly functional phone at a low price, when the point is actually to hate Apple no matter what.

  14. oceanhippie

    I have a Nokia 5.1, recently upgraded, - it was Cheap $320 Aussie, I dropped it several times on hard floors no cover - yes it cracked but it still worked. The Charge port was getting dicky as well, but for the price I was dead impressed. Still use it as a house hold remote and don't-care-what-happes-to-it phone.

    "Stock android", Screen and battery good fingerprint scanner OK. Given the price of smartphones these days it was bloody excellent.

    Don't knock a cheap smartphone with 'vanilla' android on it - see current front page for budget phone story with pre installed malware.

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