back to article Remember Unrollme, the biz that helped you automatically ditch unwanted emails? Yeah, it was selling your data

If you were one of the millions of people who signed up with Unrollme to cut down on spammy emails from outfits you once bought a product from, we have some bad news for you: it was storing and selling your data. On Tuesday, America's Federal Trade Commission finalized a settlement [PDF] with the New York City company, noting …

  1. Nunyabiznes Silver badge

    Good Lord

    What exactly do you have to do to get a good spanking from those twats?

    1. JohnFen Silver badge

      Re: Good Lord

      Fail to pay the bribes or kickbacks?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Good Lord

      What exactly do you have to do to get a good spanking from those twats?

      Wear leather & spandex?

  2. J. Cook Silver badge
    Trollface

    So, that's that. It’s business as usual, and Unrollme doesn’t have to pay a fine or even admit it wiped its feet on user trust. A win for everyone! ®

    Well, technically, it didn't wipe it's feet on user trust, but rather the part of the body that the feet are ultimately connected to...

    glad I never used that service.

    1. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

      Mate, I'm trying to keep it classy here.

      C.

      1. sbt Silver badge
        Trollface

        Snob! Look, it's a snob!

        Boy, have you come to the wrong place. It's all lumpen proletariat around here.

        1. jake Silver badge
          Pint

          Re: Snob! Look, it's a snob!

          That doesn't warrant a "unclear on the concept", nor a ::whoosh:: ... in fact, I'm not quite certain what it warrants.

          But have a beer. You need one.

          1. sbt Silver badge
            Thumb Up

            An arrest warrant, maybe?

            It was a joke, so probably doesn't warrant anything. But thanks for the virtual beer.

  3. JohnFen Silver badge

    In this day and age

    I have reached the point where I simply assume that any data I give to a company will be extracted and sold everywhere, regardless of what the company (or their privacy policy) says.

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: In this day and age

      For values of "this day and age" that started some 60 years ago, presumably?

      1. Martin-73 Silver badge
        Windows

        Re: In this day and age

        Only 60 old chap?

      2. JohnFen Silver badge

        Re: In this day and age

        More than that. The difference is that doing so is much cheaper, more efficient, and harder to avoid than 60 or more years ago.

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: In this day and age

          I typoed, should have been 50 years ago ... I was specifically thinking about 1968, when IBM transferred it's Information Marketing Division to SBC ... Later, in the mid-late 1980s, a certain high-tech market payed for the placement of advertising into the MOTDs of a couple Silly Con Valley BBSes ... they were detecting connection speeds of 1200 or 2400 (or less) and offering cheap 9600 baud modems to those folks "still in the slow lane". The outcry was loud and instant, and they stopped the practice within a day or so and apologized for the "experiment".

          It's all been downhill from there.

          1. KittenHuffer Silver badge
            Coat

            Re: In this day and age

            Match Of The Day?!? I don't remember seeing those adverts! I must have missed the 'day or so' when they did it.

    2. Bearshark

      Re: In this day and age

      @JohnFen gets it,

      If anybody actually trusts ANY company to keep your data private, including government institutions, then you are a fool. In my opinion it goes this way:

      Private companies sell 80% of our data where the other 20% is stolen.

      Government(s) in general sell 10% of our data and 90% of our data gets stolen due to Government incompetence.

      1. Alumoi

        Re: In this day and age

        As a public servant I beg to differ. Governments don't sell our data. It just happens to give access to said data to private parties when they purchase services.

    3. LateAgain

      Re: In this day and age

      and they don't. They'll be bought by somone who will.

  4. Martin-73 Silver badge

    bASTARDS

    I kind of figured they were lower case bastards when enrolling...err unrolling? got them into my smartphone address book in a 'really hard to delete' way. Gits. Boris's government's too good for em

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Old fish saying

    "There's always a hook in that tasty morsel"

  6. sbt Silver badge
    Big Brother

    This is, of course, not illegal.

    I assume you mean "in the USA". I think it would fall afoul of the GDPR, for example, and here down under, the APPs.

    1. Peter Gathercole Silver badge

      Re: This is, of course, not illegal.

      I just bought a new smart TV (not because it was smart, but because it was a good deal, even for a basic TV), and I read the screens and screens of terms and agreements that came up for each part of using the TV (even getting it connect to the Internet so that it could get the enhanced epg had about 12 screens of user agreement).

      And it was at pains to point out that all of the terms were GDPR compliant, and if it was found any clause wasn't. it would not invalidate the whole agreement, just the affected clause.

      And it was wanting to track the use of the telly, the channels that were being watched (for the purposes of starting up at the same point it was turned off - all for YOUR benefit, of course), and any smart applications used, web sites visited, online videos watched etc.

      This is endemic. We will now never stop this happening, even with GDPR (which just means that they have to tell you what they want the info for, and ensure that they don't do anything else). They will just publish a wide variety of reasons, in as fuzzy way as they can get away with, and even bury that 10's of pages down a user agreement they know people won't read. Thus they will be GDPR compliant, and still process your data ("you didn't read the agreement, and yet accepted it! It's not our fault, then")

      And we will have to agree, or loose access to the streaming and online services that have already supplanted physical media for entertainment. They will ensure that some bit of service you really, really want is contained in an agreement that includes all the bits you don't.

      I'm probably going to leave the TV off the network, but I'm sure that I'll not be able to use many of the basic features of the EPG and catchup services without the network being present.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: This is, of course, not illegal.

        > I'm probably going to leave the TV off the network

        Got it in one.

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: This is, of course, not illegal.

        Why is it that whenever I see EPG my brain parses it as Eggs Per Gram?

      3. Robert Grant Silver badge

        Re: This is, of course, not illegal.

        which just means that they have to tell you what they want the info for, and ensure that they don't do anything else

        And they pass that same condition to their 3rd parties. Along with they and their 3rd parties must be able to provide all their data on you at your request, and you have a right to be forgotten. On pain of much fine.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    It can be time-consuming and tedious to click “unsubscribe” on emails as they come into your inbox

    Really?

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge

      Re: It can be time-consuming and tedious to click “unsubscribe"

      I wouldn't even click Unsubscribe, but just flag the email address for the junk folder. Some one-off generated addresses need a regexp to catch the rest you can expect from that company, but most don't.

    2. LateAgain

      Re: It can be time-consuming and tedious to click “unsubscribe”...

      Yup.

      And if it's spam you just confirmed that it's a valid email address that's in use.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020