back to article We love Kubernetes, but it's playing catch-up with our Service Fabric, says Microsoft Azure exec

A curious feature of Microsoft's cloud platform is that it has two fundamentally different platforms for microservices. One is based on the homegrown Service Fabric, while the other is orchestrated by the Google-originated Kubernetes, available on Azure through the Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS). Both are open source. How …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Not to mention that as well as being

    more advanced, Service Fabric is way way easier to work with than Kubernetes. It's a no brainer if you use Azure or Azure Stack.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      It must have changed recently then, because a few months ago it was horrible in comparison to Kubernetes. XML configuration hell. When you're doing infrastructure as code, "just generate the configuration in Visual Studio" is not very helpful.

  2. TVU Silver badge

    It's vested interest time...

    "We love Kubernetes, but it's playing catch-up with our Service Fabric, says Microsoft Azure exec"

    ^ Of course, you would say that, wouldn't you?

  3. richard nicholson

    And the Microsoft Azure Service Fabric is conceptually a generation BEHIND the Paremus Service Fabric.

    The Paremus Service Fabric an OSGi based runtime adaptive platform that can dynamically assemble runtime adaptive OSGi /Java applications!! As well as support your boring Docker Container Image REST Services written in any language you like.

    1. Throatwarbler Mangrove Silver badge
      Trollface

      But is it adaptive? I only want it if it's adaptive!

      Also: Java, I'll pass.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "One is based on the homegrown Service Fabric, while the other is orchestrated by the Google-originated Kubernetes, available on Azure through the Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS). Both are open source.

    How should developers choose, The Reg asked Jason Zander, the executive veep in charge of Azure"

    EASY. One is designed to lock you into Azure, the other is designed to avoid vendor lock-in :-)

    1. TheVogon Silver badge

      "EASY. One is designed to lock you into Azure"

      At least if you design for the features of Azure you can always bring it back on premises via Azure Stack. Good luck doing that with AWS or Google Cloud Slurpages.

    2. teeboy

      Hey Coward, Service Fabric is open source, free and runs on any cloud. The article itself says 40% of workloads are on-premises. I suggest take your visors off :)

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Stop

    Microsoft: Just fix Windows 10.

    That's all we ask. Then you can do as much cloudy stuff as you want.

  6. Teiwaz Silver badge

    Whatsis 'fabric' references

    Not content with stealing real engineering terms, they're switched to tailors now?

    Suit you, sir.

  7. digit

    Service Fabric still needs help to become a system of choice for an enterprise

    Azure Service Fabric is not very popular among corporate software developers - the learning curve is too steep. Corporations just don't have talent readily available to take advantage of the full power of the Service Fabric. There is an interesting (and free) tool allowing development of native Service Fabric microservices with TypeScript or JavaScript, connecting Service Fabric to Node.js JavaScript development ecosystem: SupercondActor Business Platform. Every company has developers familiar with Node.js and JavaScript - very little training is required.

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