back to article CIOs planning to snub Oracle for other cloudy vendors – analyst

Oracle stock has been downgraded by JP Morgan based on its CIO survey that didn't paint a rosy picture for Big Red's cloud services business. According to analyst JP analyst Mark Murphy, CIOs are planning to cut their spending with Big Red, which has led the investment bank to lower its ratings of the firm's shares from …

  1. Dwarf Silver badge

    How odd

    You crap on your customers and they walk away.

    1. DJV Silver badge

      Re: How odd

      Indeed, most bullies and bullshit merchants eventually get what they deserve.

      1. hottuberrol

        Re: How odd

        " Indeed, most bullies and bullshit merchants eventually get what they deserve."

        Big fat golden goodbyes ? That will be Hurd's second in a decade. Winner winner chicken dinner, while shareholders. employee 401K's, and customers take it in the shorts....again....

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: How odd

      Oracle have hostages, not customers.

      1. LucreLout Silver badge

        Re: How odd

        Oracle have hostages, not customers.

        Yup. Where I work we couldn't be dumping them faster if they'd given us clap.

    3. TheVogon Silver badge

      Re: How odd

      "In contrast, 27 per cent chose Microsoft and 12 per cent opted for Oracle CTO Larry Ellison's cloudy nemesis Amazon."

      Yep, it's the general consensus that after overtaking AWS in total cloud revenue run rate a year ago Microsoft will pretty soon overtake them in individual aspects like PAAS and SAAS too.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How odd

        According to the latest gartner magic quadrant, azure has 4 billion run rate and AWS has 20 Billion. Ms dominating email in the cloud, but not much else.

        1. TheVogon Silver badge

          Re: How odd

          "According to the latest gartner magic quadrant, azure has 4 billion run rate and AWS has 20 Billion. Ms dominating email in the cloud, but not much else."

          Those figures are a bit out of date:

          https://www.forbes.com/sites/bobevans1/2018/04/27/microsoft-tops-amazon-in-q1-cloud-revenue-6-0-billion-to-5-44-billion-ibm-third-at-4-2-billion/

          Azure is also consistently growing twice as fast as AWS. Microsoft have a lot more in cloud than just Azure - O365 for a start. They beat AWS in total cloud revenue over a year ago now.

      2. steelpillow Silver badge
        Coat

        Re: How odd

        "You crap on your customers and they walk away."

        "In contrast, 27 per cent chose Microsoft..."

        Not sure these two statements are wholly compatible?

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: How odd

      All those who have been unfortunate enough to have to deal with them during an audit will all be down the pub raising a few glasses when they do eventually circle the drain.

      I really pity the poor sods who have not managed to escape yet as I dont think i have ever experienced another company that treats their customer quite as badly as they do. The posters who commented that they treat their customers like an ATM 100% spot on

  2. StuntMisanthrope

    Check raise.

    All banks are great. Please take the piss more. #threelettercards

  3. Bryan Hall

    Audits and Cloud Tax

    For us dropping Oracle it came basically down to two things: Audits with Oracle people who don't know their products and licensing so they try and unfairly screw you over (partner - yeah right). Cloud Tax - only allowing 1 "core" per license for x64 on anything but their own cloud (so yeah, it IS faster by default).

    Can you say - hello PostgreSQL and SQL Server? PostgreSQL for the heavy lifting and spatial databases, and SS for the sleepy databases where the app can use whatever platform.

    1. TheVogon Silver badge

      Re: Audits and Cloud Tax

      "PostgreSQL for the heavy lifting and spatial databases, and SS for the sleepy databases where the app can use whatever platform."

      Usually the other way round in enterprises. Postgres for the small developer driven stuff and SQL Server for the large mission critical stuff where performance and enterpeise support matters. All our trading platforms run on SQL Server as the underlying store.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Audits and Cloud Tax

        > All our trading platforms run on SQL Server as the underlying store.

        Yes, but you're working in a mostly MS-centric place anyway so that's the standard choice there.

        That PostgreSQL is used at all by yourselves just goes to show it's making inroads all over the place.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Audits and Cloud Tax

          Agree. I don't know why anyone would move to MS SQL. Azure is a complete rip off too.

          1. TheVogon Silver badge

            Re: Audits and Cloud Tax

            "I don't know why anyone would move to MS SQL."

            Well compared to Oracle, better security, lower cost of ownership, ease of development and far better integration would be significant reasons to move.

            "Azure is a complete rip off too."

            Compared to what? It's usually marginally cheaper than AWS for generally better performance.

        2. TheVogon Silver badge

          Re: Audits and Cloud Tax

          "That PostgreSQL is used at all by yourselves just goes to show it's making inroads all over the place."

          It isn't used by us. We ditched Oracle and have moved to AAG on SQL Server. However I have worked places where it is used, and it's generally niches where developers could do their own thing. Hardly anyone uses it in prod instead of Oracle or SQL Server. Market share is tiny, and few vendor systems support it.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    If I were a CIO right now I’d simply announce that this years’s bonus pot would be funded from savings made on Oracle licenses, then sit back and let nature take its course.

  5. TheVogon Silver badge

    "CIOs are planning to cut their spending with Big Red"

    Since forever. Oracle doesnt have customers, it has prisoners.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Oracle doesnt have customers, it has prisoners.

      And that's an outcome of the hugely common, but faulty idea that "we're not an IT company, we should use an expert IT company for our ERP". Speaking with some knowledge of this, the small number of companies who manage to use third party ERP successfully are bricks and mortar retailers. They demand -and get- code held in escrow, change of control provisions, commitments on price inflation, and exit without penalty clauses, as well as a keen price and strong guarantees on performance. The reason for this is that they have expert purchasing teams and engaged directors who ask the right questions.

      Whereas, a government, energy sector, or telecoms buyer, nope. Their purchasing team is often very, very good within their sector specialism....but outside it they're worse than a four year old negotiating a sweet purchase. And it's these outfits who are the prisoners. Even doing daft stuff like buying up-and-coming ERP systems without realising the corporate dynamics of the sector mean that it will be borged, sunsetted, and they'll be even worse off....

  6. Milton Silver badge

    Eventually, the arrogance bill comes due

    It may sometimes take an unconscionably long time, but when a person or company is an arrogant SOB, there's always, always a price to pay.

    In the mid 90s, when Oracle was arguably still worth paying money for (focusing then, as it did, principally on the RDBMS and before all the other crud got stuck on like so many mismatched barnacles), its corporate and staff attitude was, shall we say, a little malodorous. There was an almost religious feel about the company and product, something which would brook no crticisim, no matter how well justified or positively expressed.

    During the years since it seems to have become ever more desperate in attempting to follow, badly, where rivals have led, often well. The pattern of good products acquired, quickly ruined as an Oracle badge was pasted on along with a shoddy integration into a "suite", seems to have resulted in paradoxically more unearned arrogance as the company has fallen further and further behind. (For a long time now, to compare someone's character to an Oracle salesperson has not been a nice thing to say.)

    You can't help feeling that a little humilty, flexibiltiy and willingness to learn, ten or fifteen years ago, might have made all the difference.

    But now it's too late. Why would any new customer choose Oracle for anything, by this point? Really, why would you even consider doing that? There is an abundance of competitors with better, cheaper, faster, more innovative and reliable technology—who also have the great advantage of not treating their customers like dumb, ambulant ATMs.

    So Oracle is actually well into circling-the-drain mode, although its installed base of hostages means it will take a long time to gurgle away. But gurgle it will. And very few of us will shed a tear.

  7. Multivac

    Correction:

    CIO's want more dinners at fancy restaurants, tickets to shows and corporate golf tournaments before they'll consider Oracle cloud.

    Because we all know how this works, when the CIO's agree with the technical people they employ you know some dodgy shizzle's going down.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I...

    ...was going to post some Oracle hate here, but y'all beat me to it!

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