back to article New South Wales ponders post-mortem data protection laws

The Australian state of New South Wales has ordered an inquiry into what happens to your social media accounts and digital assets once you’re dead. The State’s Law Reform Commission has been tasked with probing “whether NSW needs legislation to regulate who can access the digital assets of a person who has died or is …

  1. ICPurvis47 Bronze badge
    Coffee/keyboard

    Keeping it in the family

    One would have thought that if you make a will leaving everything to a family member, that this would include such details. Of course, if you die intestate, then these questions and problems will arise, and someone will have to go through the courts to obtain probate. Moral of this story, make a will and keep it up to date before you get into a condition where you cannot do so.

    1. SImon Hobson Silver badge

      Re: Keeping it in the family

      Problem with that is you can only "leave stuff you own" in your will. One of the problems with digital assets is that (for example) stuff you "buy" on iTunes isn't bought - you merely get a licence to use it, and the T&Cs specifically exclude transferring that licence.

      So when you die, stuff (for example) that you "bought" on iTunes cannot be left to anyone - the licence simply terminates and no-one gets it.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Pint

        Re: Keeping it in the family - Subscriptions Suck

        Hahaha !! Subscriptions alone suck !!! you can't leave them to anyone.

        So Go to "Bandcamp.com", purchase some music (directly supporting the artists) and download it, burn it to disc, and you can also stream the music to your phone or system. {sweet}

        But also, if corporations can purchase copyright for music and thereby extend copyright indefinitely, why not leave music subscriptions to family members.

        I think a Will and Testament clearly stating that people are allowed to access your digital property would give such rights. but who will remember to do this and where are the passwords, can the executors access the device to get them, if not in a little book or sticky-note next to the PC.

        And as many subscriptions are for overseas product, services and storage what about that in AU legislation?

        Good on the Gov for approaching the issue.

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