back to article HPE burns offering to Apollo 6500, unleashes cranked deep learning server on world+dog

HPE has updated its Apollo 6500 deep learning server with a threefold performance boost over its precursor by stuffing it with eight Tesla V100 GPUs, which speak to each other via Nvidia's NVlink 2.0 interconnect protocol. HPE claimed the Nvidia gear makes it, on average, 3.12 times faster than the previous gen9 Apollo 6500 at …

  1. This post has been deleted by its author

  2. x 7

    Is that Tesla as in Musk and cars, or just a coincidence in naming?

    1. JetSetJim

      Tesla the car company send to predate the Nvidia GPU by a few years, but it's just a coincidence of naming.

    2. Casper42

      Tesla

      They are both named after Nikola Tesla who was a brilliant Scientist and made a ton of discoveries and advancements with electricity. Thus the Car company name...

      Saddens me people don't know who he was.

      Tesla is Nvidia Compute lineup whereas GeForce is gaming and Quadro is professional workstations (CAD, 3D Animation, etc)

      Nvidia GPUs have been named after Mathematicians and Scientists for a while now.

      V = Volta

      P = Pascal

      M = Maxwell

      K = Kepler

  3. Daniel von Asmuth
    Paris Hilton

    Does it come with Domain/OS preinstalled?

    n/t

  4. Nate Amsden Silver badge

    guesses

    the PSUs are front mounted but they want the air intake on the front, so they pipe the cables to the rear of the chassis for connection to actual power.

    The older gen system was 2 servers in 1 chassis, this one appears to be a single server in 1 chassis:

    - single XL270d Gen10 Server supports 8 GPUs, same as the 6500 Gen10

    - single server also supports 16 drive bays, which is what the picture appears to show

    I suppose it's possible HP will offer other servers that can go into the 6500 Gen10 chassis, but for now it seems both 6500 Gen10 and XL270d Gen10 are basically the same, unless the XL270d Gen10 can be used in another chassis, which from the looks of their product line up doesn't appear to be possible.

    1. Nate Amsden Silver badge

      Re: guesses

      to clarify a bit the usage of cables on the power supplies as the picture indicates is likely just a cost saving measure, vs designing custom power supplies to do things another way.

    2. Casper42

      Re: guesses

      The PSUs are front mounted because there was no room in the back and the cables are on the front because an existing PSU Design was 99% recycled (fans reversed).

      The internal design noted in this article is horribly wrong.

      The GPUs are all in the top rear above the system board so their hot air goes right out the back and the SMX2 connection between GPUs (think SLI Bridge from the GeForce cards) can easily connect multiple GPUs.

      The Apollo 6500 Gen10 QuickSpecs is now live and has more details.

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