back to article We sent a vulture to IBM's new developer conference to find an answer to the burning question: Why Big Blue?

At the first IBM Index developer conference in San Francisco, California, on Tuesday, I spent the morning at a Kubernetes workshop learning that when apps on the IBM Cloud Container Service fail to deploy, the reason may not be obvious. The presenter, IBM cloud program manager Chris Rosen, framed the event as an opportunity to …

  1. redpawn Silver badge

    Yay Java!

    As experts does IBM make better lattes than computers? Are they going into competition with Starbucks?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Yay Java!

      Only in IBM's mind are they the 'Java Experts'. Or experts in anything but creating marketing presentations selling vaporware....

      Especially in a world where Java is so last decade. Try scala , python and go are the hot languages these days. (go == golang)

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Yay Java!

        Nobody in their right minds would consider Python a programming language.

        Any so-called programming language that mandates correct whitespace placement for correct parsing and execution is nothing but pure evil

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          @AC Re: Yay Java!

          I guess you missed the memo. Python is a programming language. Especially when people call Javascript a programming language.

          There's a lot of real work being done in Python.

          So knowing Scala, Python and Golang will cover you for a while.

  2. FozzyBear
    Facepalm

    when apps on the IBM Cloud Container Service fail to deploy, the reason may not be obvious.

    So a whole morning on this. any chance they spent some of this time providing some insight as to where you should start looking. Or did they basically shrug their shoulders and wish you good luck sorting out that crap.

    1. Nolveys

      So a whole morning on this. any chance they spent some of this time providing some insight as to where you should start looking.

      AWS or Rackspace.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Regarding the disparate figures around cloud revenue...

    word is software contracts have been changed to include "cloud" in them, so no matter where you are running yer WAS or db2 it's considered cloudy income.

  4. deadlockvictim Silver badge

    IBM Droid» "Why IBM?" mused Duimovich. "We are driving a pretty aggressive optimization and ease of use story for cloud Java."

    So, he drives stories. Hmmm.

  5. HmmmYes

    Hmm, the Java VM has a bit of a problem with the Cloud.

    JVM eats memory. basically, you only half compile a Java binary, leaving the VM for JITing.

    That was OK when the JVM runs on a physical .

    Its a huge problem on a VM - VM memory speed is shit.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Missing a disclaimer?

    "In the cloud, he explained, that translates to workloads that cost half as much to run under memory-based pricing as a standard VM."

    Shouldn't this include a disclaimer along the lines of "comparing a poorly configured Java application on an overpriced IBM cloud service to a Java application on Z where the memory pricing is a separate line item. This may not match any real world conditions'.

    Unless IBM have examples that can't be right torn apart in seconds...

  7. //DLBL SYSRES

    Ignoring the rhetorical nature of the headline, I always thought they were called Big Blue (aka It's Being Mended) because their kit was usually blue, grey and cream and it was a stonkingly large and powerful company.

    You need to think in 1970 terms. No one got fired for buying IBM.

  8. handleoclast

    Why would you pick anyone who doesn't have a JVM team?

    I would pick them because they don't have a JVM team. It means they're less likely to use Java as a solution.

    YMMV

  9. John Savard Silver badge

    They've Got Stuff

    They've got some technologies that might be valuable.

    Their mainframes, while priced high, and aimed at legacy customers, are far more secure than Windows servers, and, in fact, I think that z/OS has an advantage over Linux and even BSD in this department. But if they made that tech available at competitive prices - would it sell enough to pay for its development? Or would it just throw away money by cannibalizing their existing customer base?

    So I can understand why they're paralyzed... but the world does need genuinely secure servers, and IBM is uniquely positioned to meet that need.

    But if they try to meet that need with what they have, and it fails, they could lose a big revenue stream for no return. I wish I knew what to recommend to them.

  10. cs9

    IBM's new slogan: "No one ever got fired for trashing IBM offerings while refusing to be named in the press."

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