back to article Fending off cyber attacks as important as combatting terrorism, says new GCHQ chief

Keeping the UK safe from cyber attacks is now as important as fighting terrorism, the new GCHQ boss has said. Jeremy Fleming, director of the signals intelligence service, said increased funding for GCHQ was being spent on making it a "cyber-organisation" as much as an intelligence and counter-terrorism unit. Fleming, who …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "keeping our citizens safe and free online"

    How exactly am I free? They monitor everything I type and view online then at some point they could view an opinion I express or something I view as illegal then I get locked up. Free I am not.

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

  2. jmch Silver badge

    Priorities...

    "Fending off cyber attacks as important as combatting terrorism"

    Hmmm....

    Translatingfrom politician-speak to tech-speak = "Having strong encryption as important as breaking encryption"

    Does not compute!

    You cannot make these 2 equal priority, one has to be more important than the other. And to any sane non-politician (mostly, but not limited to, anyone with any understanding of encryption) that means that fending off cyber attacks has to be a higher priority than combatting terrorism.

  3. Allonymous Coward
    Headmaster

    "Cyber" is an adjective

    For that matter, so is "digital". A distinction that seems to be getting blurred with every piece of tech-related news burbled out of the public sector these days.

    If cyber is a tier-one threat, what's tier-two? Tall? Fast? Supercilious?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "Cyber" is an adjective

      Yer mam

    2. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

      Re: "Cyber" is an adjective

      If cyber is a tier-one threat, what's tier-two?

      A PPE degree..

      1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge
        Joke

        Re: "Cyber" is an adjective

        If cyber is a tier-one threat, what's tier-two?

        Chuck Norris with a BB gun? Doh, of course not, that should be tier-one (that's minus one)

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    About time

    At least Fleming recognises that cyber defence/policing is right up there with physical defence/policing, and has got more money to do it. About time, I say.

    I just hope he can find some trustworthy cybersecurity experts to spend the money on. >cough< IR35 >cough<

    1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

      Re: About time

      I just hope he can find some trustworthy cybersecurity experts to spend the money on. >cough< IR35 >cough<

      In addition to them also being prepared to work for HM.Gov.

      Hmm, I think their sieve is broken, it only seems to be picking up static.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Meh

    Soooo....

    ...they will release all the exploits they have in their arsenal to the appropriate vendors then?

    No, thought not.

    Move along

    1. You aint sin me, roit

      Re: Soooo....

      I would say that they should provide all citizens with free (well, paid for by the taxpayer) software defences. But you know they wouldn't be able to resist putting in some snooping backdoors. Who would trust GCHQ?

      One idea that arose following the Kaspersky (alleged) snooping of NSA secrets was that an ordinary citizen in the UK or the US is better off being snooped on by Russians than their own government - after all, the Russians can't get to you as easily. And if they did, then killing you, zipping you up in a bag and padlocking it from the outside might make the coppers think there's something suspicious going on...

      1. tiggity Silver badge

        Re: Soooo....

        Upvote as well known the body in bag with external padlock etc. story you refer to was not the Russians...

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Soooo....

          well known the body in bag with external padlock etc. story you refer to was not the Russians...

          What do you mean, it "was not the Russians"? Are you a fool Mr tiggity? EVERYTHING is the fault of the Russians. The British government tells me that it is so. The Arab refugee crisis, that was the Russians. The rise of AfD in Germany, that was the Russians. The fractured nature of US politics, that was the Russians. Fat Boy Kim, he's the fault of the Russians. China's outlandish claims on the South China Sea, that's the Russians, too. Every form of malware, and every undisclosed zero day, that's Russians for you. Brexit, that's the fault of the Russians. Catalan secessionism, that's the Russians as well. Toast falling butter side down, that's the Russians. Not getting a clean break when going for a dump, that's the Russians' fault.

  6. ChrisElvidge

    To quote somebody else:

    "Well, he would say that wouldn't he?"

  7. John Smith 19 Gold badge
    Unhappy

    Perhaps they could start by making sure their exploits are still under their control?

    Unlike the NSA, at least some of whose are not .

  8. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    "attacks needing a national response in the last year, as previously reported. This included the WannaCry"

    A national response? Maybe in terms of clean-up but it wasn't GCHQ who stopped it.

    1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge
      Unhappy

      No, it wasn't, but I believe the guy who did help them out was repaid handsomely.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Ok, good...

    So, first of all please tell the Home Sec, who is determined to cock all of this up through her f'ing ignorant attitude to encryption.

    Second, what exactly are you GCHQ doing about the Russian trollbots and similar nefarious influences (like Cambridge Analytica, and anyone else with deep pockets to buy Facebook power) which corrupt democracy with things like Brexit?

  10. allthecoolshortnamesweretaken

    Yes, fending off cyber attacks is as important as fighting terrorism, and has been so for quite some time.

    But why do I feel like this statement is an opening gambit to implementing increased mass surveillance, reduction of individual privacy, and back doors?

  11. amanfromMars 1 Silver badge

    No license to thrill, no right to head intelligence agencies. Beware fraudsters at the helm.

    Defending the indefensible and obnoxious, corrupting elites and perverse easily subverted fiat currency power bases is always going to have useful useless idiots acting as if they be defending whole nations and established ways of living.

    Does that captain of a sinking ship hat fit Jeremy Fleming perfectly?

    And if that is the true sum of his Great Game Plan, then is he a clear and present danger to any and all who would be so enthralled and dependent upon his not so secret security services servering services.

    1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

      Re: No license to thrill, no right to head intelligence agencies. Beware fraudsters at the helm.

      The translator device has definitely had a firmware upgrade.

      Of course, one also has to consider that it is the observer that has changed, not the subject.

      1. amanfromMars 1 Silver badge

        Re: No license to thrill, no right to head intelligence agencies. Beware fraudsters at the helm.

        Of course, one also has to consider that it is the observer that has changed, not the subject..... Sir Runcible Spoon

        Quite so, Sir. And with both criteria exhibiting improvement and momentum in the right direction, does the future look brighter and able to be a whole lot different from the pathetic austere past.

        And a right scary nightmare for guardians and establishments wedded to petrified past masters for their oats, methinks.

        What think thee of they and all of that?

        1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

          Re: No license to thrill, no right to head intelligence agencies. Beware fraudsters at the helm.

          What think thee of they and all of that?

          I've lost track of the number of times my hopes have been dashed. So I suppose the answer to that is 'I'm tired.' Nothing else is printable without tempting knocks on doors in the wee hours.

  12. Teiwaz Silver badge

    Fending off cyber attacks as important as combatting terrorism, says new GCHQ chief

    Any help fending off the legalised cyber intrusions and mass data collection carried out by runaway governments?

    There's a psy-moon somewhere where the frogs chorus 'useless' for such as these people.

  13. Primus Secundus Tertius

    Legal doctrines

    In England there used to be a legal doctrine, in Latin, to the effect that the law does not deal with trifles. So if you fiddled the raffle at the tennis club, MI5 are not interested in that particular misdeed, although it would tell them something about you. Nor can they conceivably be directly interested in the average nutjob opinions that infest the wibbly wobbly web. That is why they never get further than the surveillance computer systems. But in this wicked world, the authorities have to keep watch, even if the moaners keep moaning.

    Unfortunately the litigious attitudes of the USA have spread to England (the case of Scotland must be discussed separately) and so many legal cases today would have been regarded as trifling in times past.

    Bring back the concept of trifle, it is so good for all of us. And let the USA take note.

    1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

      Re: Legal doctrines

      Bring back the concept of trifle, it is so good for all of us

      Not good for me - too much sugar. And all those multi-coloured sprinkles on top give me hives.

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Dear Jeremy Fleming and Amber Rudd:

    palaeocrystalline surcharged two-teeth self-condemnation impasting overaccurately honoree faddist viduation arthrosporous tongue-lash fringiness half-plane dabble osmatism psychol. phrenetical plectrum waysider hausen mithraic reconsignment stiff-horned Flathead Aspidocephali polypier manner silently inwardly workingwoman hout alada self-recording sweet-scented Altingiaceae dufoil intervisibility rallying toiler disserviceableness shallow-pated dim-sightedness glosts biasnesses cylinderlike backstreet kickdown ahsan mesoplastral indite Hypohippus earthmaker artifact lithogenesis wavy-edged Ancilin corn-flag hydrargyric knownothingism tut-tutted ultrabelieving justifably zacate Hagood lithotripsy tanger reoccurred Huang spectroscopies pluguglies transplace commercialised periclean fibromyitis cordonazo acetates unmateriate advertize iliocaudal pseudoscience gramash knickknack Adrianople Nahuatl AAX bookish cosinage jackrabbit amicable imprecant asheries nonindustriously unsiccative aspirators meaul Tambouki Dannemora outblot Clyve wrong-principled menopause

    Signed: Anonymous Coward

    1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge
      Headmaster

      I wouldn't want to be ocd about grammar whilst reading that ;p

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