back to article 'Hyper' kids ate all the sales growth again, say converged systems beancounters

IDC's latest Worldwide Quarterly Converged Systems Tracker shows a flight to the top vendors, away from HPE, Hitachi and the Others' category, with the hyperconverged sector being the only growth area. Worldwide converged systems vendor revenues increased 6.2 per cent year over year to $3.15bn, and those overall stats break …

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    Orders for PCs are forecast to shrink in 2022 as consumers confront rising inflation, the war in Ukraine, and lockdowns in parts of the world critical to the supply chain, all of which continue.

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  • US Navy told to do a 'supplemental' integrity investigation of $2.5b Dell deal
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  • PC sales start to ebb as pandemic buying spree ends: IDC
    Analyst says it's not a 'downward spiral' as sales are still defying predictions

    Shipments of PCs have finally slowed down after two years of double-digit growth, declining worldwide by 5.1 per cent year-on-year in Q1 2022, market research firm International Data Corp (IDC) said on Monday.

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    Vendors still shipped over 80 million desktops, notebooks and workstations during the quarter – and did so for a seventh consecutive quarter. Such a feat hasn't happened since 2012.

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    IDC forecasts that spending on compute and storage systems for cloud infrastructure will grow 21.7 percent this year compared to 2021. Spending on public clouds is also expected to pass that of non-cloud infrastructure in 2022.

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