back to article Tesla, GitHub, tech bro VCs... Silicon Valley sexism row explodes as more women go public

Simmering anger over Silicon Valley sexism has exploded, with a slew of women going public with allegations of unwanted sexual advances at the top of the tech industry. In the latest example of snowballing allegations, top angel investor David McClure was accused of sexual assault by Cheryl Sew Hoy hours after he resigned from …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Harry, you're a beast!

    Given that these charges are being made in the über-cool Bay Area, where males ought be less piggish, not more, what gives? Could there possibly be an excess of charges instead? Or is it all true, and guys who run IT companies just get extra horny?

    1. Your alien overlord - fear me

      Re: Harry, you're a beast!

      Power corrupts, absolute power.....

    2. Throatwarbler Mangrove Silver badge
      Thumb Down

      Re: Harry, you're a beast!

      I suspect that more women are finally finding the courage to come forward publicly after seeing the first few do so.

      1. Throatwarbler Mangrove Silver badge
        Meh

        Re: Harry, you're a beast!

        To clarify my comment, I suspect that momentum is building, and more women are coming forward as they see they're not the only ones on the receiving end of this behavior, are less intimidated because they see they have a community of people who have experienced the same thing, and they see that the press is actually taking them seriously.

      2. bombastic bob Silver badge
        Unhappy

        Re: Harry, you're a beast!

        "I suspect that more women are finally finding the courage to come forward publicly after seeing the first few do so."

        Although we'd like to think this, for the sake of those subjected to unwanted harassment like that, I suspect 'not so much'. If this were the 1960's, maybe it would be like that. Sexual harassment was tolerated back then, particularly the more subtle variety, accidentally going past a lady when she can't move out of the way properly, various forms of ogling, etc. etc.. [basically rude bad-male behavior]. And 'fear for one's job' was a real concern. Coming forward could get you fired, depending on who your boss was.

        Still, there are those people, even in the 21st century, who think they can get away this this kind of crap. I cite our former mayor, and former U.S. Congressman, Bob Filner. I call him "Feelner". I also didn't vote for him (I'd rather die than vote for a Demo-rat anyway).

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Filner

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Filner#Conviction

        yes, he really DOES have a snake-face. His criminal conviction is the important detail, which is why I included a separate link for it (you can skip the glowing somewhat biased review of his 'accomplishments' and skip to who he REALLY is). He was known to grab women in a kind of headlock and do things to them, for starters, "the Filner Headlock" as it was called. I heard about a lot of this on local radio when it was all current news, so you'd have to look for it to see the gory details.

        The point is, of course, that powerful people in powerful positions STILL try to get away with this kind of crap. But women are pretty savvy to the rules now, and rightfully do something about it. Though there may be some truth to the idea of 'seeing others come forward' it isn't quite like it used to be where there was actual fear of losing your job for doing so [although threats and intimidation from sexual harassers may still cause a bit of that].

        There's also the case of FALSE accusations of sexual harassment, by gold-diggers and others who might delude themselves into believing something happened when it did not [this has happened before, with high profile celebrities, no names mentioned]. That being said, a legit claim should most definitely be dealt with.

        It sort of ruins the way men and women relate to one another, though, NOT to have a bit of "that" in the office. But yeah, you just can't do anything fun any more between the sexes. Even complimenting a woman on her looks, "nice dress" "new hair style? looks nice" etc. could be misconstrued as "harassment" particularly by some who carry a chip on their shoulders. Yeah, sucks.

        1. Jeremy Puddleduck

          Re: Harry, you're a beast!

          "It sort of ruins the way men and women relate to one another, though, NOT to have a bit of "that" in the office."

          What? Women have to be made to feel uncomfortable just so you can have a "bit of that" in your day?

          What an enlightened arsehole you are Bob.

    3. Alistair

      Re: Harry, you're a beast!

      @ BigJohn

      I'm going to go with the following variation on your comment

      Guys with lots of money end up with the expectation that (sexual targets) will be interested just because of money, and there are possibly some (sexual targets) that may decide to use that against them......

      I'll allow that *not every single person* on this planet is *100%* honest in their actions. But really, with statistics we've got *now* we know that *males rape females* constantly, never mind using power to manipulate, catcalling, or other such dominance games.

      It needs to change.

      Hopefully the *social media giants* that have these issues have the resources, will and determination to address this. Socially. Loudly. Say, by banning Advertisers that misuse the inherent sexual dominance concept in western culture?

    4. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Harry, you're a beast!

      über-cool Bay Area

      What exactly is uber-cool about an area where it is an essential career requirement NOT TO HAVE A LIFE.

      Corollary: Do you expect people who do not have a life to have normal social attitudes and being capable of normal social interaction.

      This just comes with the territory. It does not matter what companies do, what companies claim. As long as the employees are expected to spend all of their life either in the commuter vehicle or at their desk, the issue will persist.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Harry, you're a beast!

        I'm sorry, V'srh, your comment assumes the entire BayArea is high tech. It ain't. Not any more than all of London talks like that Jamie Oliver twat.

      2. 's water music
        Headmaster

        Not just cool but Uber-cool

        >>über-cool Bay Area

        What exactly is uber-cool about an area where it is an essential career requirement NOT TO HAVE A LIFE.

        Uber - Prefix used to form a word that means a shitty, broken or otherwise negative version of the affixed term. From the US based sexual harassment and taxi company.

    5. Cuddles Silver badge

      Re: Harry, you're a beast!

      "where males ought be less piggish, not more, what gives? Could there possibly be an excess of charges instead? Or is it all true, and guys who run IT companies just get extra horny?"

      Your missing a rather obvious third option - it's actually worse elsewhere. Careers as diverse as manual labour and banking have long had reputations for harassing not just colleagues but anything female in the general vicinity. You can argue about whether it's deserved in specific cases, but those reputations didn't just pop up out of nowhere. As for politics, Trump openly boasted about sexual assaults that should have landed him in prison and was elected president instead, while Berlusconi seemed to think he was living in the Playboy mansion while running Italy. And of course the less said about things like the Catholic church and children's entertainers the better.

      Far from there being something special about IT companies, it's rather clear that sexism, racism, and various other -isms are still extremely pervasive throughout society. We've done a decent job over the last century of officially recognising that people of various different shapes and colours actually are people, but there still seems to be quite a way to go in getting a lot of people to actually act like it. The only reason Silicon Valley is currently getting attention in the matter is because, much like the Catholic church, it's managed to hit a critical mass of complaints that mean the problem can no longer by dismissed as a small number of isolated incidents but is actually an endemic problem. Unfortunately this largely results in people, as demonstrated in the above post, dismissing Silicon Valley itself as a somewhat larger isolated incident rather than recognising the issue is present to at least some extent pretty much anywhere you care to look.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Harry, you're a beast!

        "The only reason Silicon Valley is currently getting attention in the matter is because, much like the Catholic church, it's managed to hit a critical mass of complaints"

        The cynic in me suspects that, like the Catholic Church, it's a critical mass of money that is driving the complaints in Silly Con Valley. I mean, clearly this is something that occurs throughout human interaction, it's not just the BMOC d'jour that's doing it.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    On The Musk

    > "If you are part of a less represented group, you don't get a free pass on being a jerk yourself," wrote Musk

    Without casting any aspersions on anyone involved, and without taking Mr Musk's characterisation of his ex-employee at face value, but I would think that a "hire no jerks" policy might be in order?

  3. Throatwarbler Mangrove Silver badge
    Mushroom

    Let him without sin cast the first stone

    As befits El Reg, there's a certain glee in this article about the failings of Silicon Valley "tech bro" culture. However . . . given the rampant sexism I've observed in the comments here on other articles, and given the generally misogynist tone of vast swathes of the Internet even now (see: GamerGate, etc.), I suggest folks rein in the holier-than-thou smugness sure to erupt in the comments here. Sexism and sexually predatory behavior are still quite common globally; don't be so sure that wherever you're from is somehow inherently superior. As Big John points out (I'm . . . I'm partially agreeing with Big John, somebody slap me), it's ironic that the Bay Area is fostering this culture, since San Francisco is a bastion of progressive values, but, conversely, it may be that the tech industry remains a bastion of sexism on the grounds that male tech workers have traditionally had fewer opportunities to interact with women in the flesh, as it were. Silicon Valley culture also fosters arrogance in its locally-grown engineers, leading them to have an overgrown sense of entitlement which combines unpleasantly with a lack of worldly experience.

    Anyhoo, I'm glad to see this shakeout happening. My female friends in tech have all complained about the rampant sexism they face, so I guess it's finally reached a critical mass.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone

      "it's ironic that the Bay Area is fostering this culture, since San Francisco is a bastion of progressive values"

      Many of the male icons of progressivism in America have been quite openly predatory. Fortunately, Barack Obama broke that mold. Hopefully, future leaders of that movement will view him as a role model in the way he has personally conducted himself.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone @Andy Prough

        Another low information voter.

        https://news.grabien.com/story-video-2008-campaign-appears-show-obama-flaunting-erection-fe

    2. bombastic bob Silver badge
      FAIL

      Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone

      "generally misogynist tone of vast swathes of the Internet"

      when the definition of 'misogynist' is "anyone who is a conservative or doesn't lock step with the liberal left" I can see why you might say that.

      I'd like to see the 'misandronists' called out just as frequently, particularly with respect to child custody issues and parental rights...

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Silicon Valley

      It exists in sort of a bubble, where women are fewer in number than they are in the general population, and more of the men are the "awkward don't have much experience talking to women" type than in the general population. Many people work long hours and have zero social life outside of work (though some of them would have zero social life even if they worked only 40 hours a week)

      The spectrum from casual sexism to sexual assault isn't something you're automatically immune to committing just because you're progressive, so I don't see what being in SF rather than a more conservative big city like say Dallas has to do with it. You may be more aware of it and indignant when it is demonstrated that others have engaged in it, but that doesn't mean you'll be more aware of it within yourself.

      I agree with those who suggested that money is part of this. Some women are attracted to men with money, and men with money know it. The problem with the behavior being described is that it ISN'T offensive to ALL women - some of them crave attention from men with money. There's certainly no shortage of money in the Valley.

      Some men are lucky, and are able to read women like a book, and know who is interested in them beforehand, so they will never have to worry about making unwanted advances. Most of us are sadly not blessed with this, and some buffoons simply 'press ahead' with their behavior, perhaps likening it in their mind to asking a dozen girls to dance - even if most turn you down eventually one will say yes. Combine with alcohol, drugs and/or a general lack of empathy for how others feel and you get the behavior being described.

      The only fix is for the women (and any men that may see it happen around them) to call it out, so behavior is eventually forced to be modified. That won't fix everything, of course, nothing will. It would at least dial down the casual 'bro culture' in SV that tolerates and enables it.

    4. jake Silver badge

      Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone

      "it's ironic that the Bay Area is fostering this culture, since San Francisco is a bastion of progressive values"

      Hang on a second here. Lets make something perfectly clear: San Francisco is not now, and never has been, in charge of "The Bay Area". In fact, it might surprise you to learn that San Francisco is not now, never has been, and never will be a part of Silicon Valley. San Francisco is a tiny, little (7x7 miles) wart in the armpit of California, and doesn't speak for anybody except San Francisco. I know all this is true, because I lived there for a couple wonderful years before it became yuppified and holier than thou.

      We now return you to your usually scheduled ElReg commentard pontification.

      1. Throatwarbler Mangrove Silver badge
        Thumb Up

        Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone

        "In fact, it might surprise you to learn that San Francisco is not now, never has been, and never will be a part of Silicon Valley."

        Thank.

        Fucking.

        God.

        San Francisco is, of course, certainly not the heart of Silicon Valley because Silicon Valley has no heart.

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone

          Never mind the heart ... SF is not a PART of Silly Con Valley. Silly Con Valley has no heart any more than any other geographical location has a heart.

    5. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

      Re: Let him without sin cast the first stone

      We get a lot of our social conditioning (i.e. learning acceptable social behaviour) just from bouncing off other people. So I wonder how much of it is just the male-dominated industry thing? Obviously there's some chicken-and-egg in that you're likely to get fewer women working in an environment hostile to women.

      But I'm in the building services industry. And it's incredibly sexist. Now sure we have some engineers, but most of them aren't doing anything particularly esoteric and I don't think have quite the same cliched image as IT has got for having more than its fair share of poeple not so comfortable in social interactions. Plus the majority of the people we deal with are buyers (non-techies fulfilling the role of the salesperson's anti-particle), sales people and guys on the tools and their bosses.

      I've had customers put through who said they needed to talk to a man to have a technical question answered - after it already had been. I pointed out that not only did the woman who'd answered his question physically build the product he was asking about, she also designed the electronics. I probably only see one once every couple of years. I can think of 5 or 10 times I've had that happen, though not so much recently - but then there's now has a technical guy in the office who probably gets those calls.

      We used to have a woman working for us in technical sales. She was happy to do a bit of light flirting to get ahead - and being different (sometimes having purple hair) meant she got remembered.

      But then one of our customers poached her for a technical role. Which turned out to be taking customers out partying in London and being the eye-candy.

      Casual sexism is obviously still a thing on building sites. But it's also a thing in all the offices of the companies related to them. And that includes the big stock market listed ones who ought to have proper HR policies.

      I can think of about 5 women engineers, and only one female senior buyer. Our contacts database has 8,000 people on it, and I probably speak to at least 1,000 of them a year. I don't remember every speaking to a woman site manager or maintenance manager in over a decade.

  4. Alistair
    Windows

    Sadly -- the fix for this will be generational

    In reality - the "bro culture" referenced here is inherent in the way we've raised our children for generations. We need to change the stories, the language we use, the variation between boys and girls as they grow in order to insert a more mutual respect.

    Mostly I'm going to say that we need to change the perspective on sexuality in general. Too often it is portrayed as conquest, rather than as covenant, or as dominance of one over other rather than a meeting of equals.

    Don't get me wrong, I know a few BDSM participants, and let me tell you, they have a far better comprehension of "equal" even there. Even in the more extreme cases. But 50 Shades of Grey is complete and utter shit and should *never* have been made into a movie. (Just the writing was utter shit, never mind the plot or the inherent rape culture that was glorified to hell).

    Certainly we as human beings need to stop allowing our cultural heritage to override the idea that there is any difference between human A and human B. Given our modern world, we *should* all be absolutely equal. Sadly - this will take generations to fix, although we should have a framework for calling out violations of it and making appropriate penalties.

    As to some corporate responses, if one is going to attempt to place "spin" on an occurrence of this nature there damned well better be video, paper evidence, and substantiated statements backing up that spin or one is going to have to be paved over.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    GitLab

    I note with delight that GitHub's main competitor is not (yet anyway) mentioned. Based on reading their company documents (most of which are publicly accessible) I get the impression that they are a pretty decent company with strong ethics, which somehow manages to stay out of Silly Valley's "exuberant" culture.

    Just a shout out to them, as I believe that positive examples are sorely needed.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    and the fifth level

    E. Stop being dicks.

    Personally and I am thankful that in the UK I have never come across this sort of behaviour in the workplace however if I did I'd pull the f*ckers up and make it clear it's not acceptable but then that's just me.

    1. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Happy

      "I have never come across this sort of behaviour in the workplace however if I did I'd pull the f*ckers up and make it clear it's not acceptable but then that's just me."

      ack. I'd probably just let the boss know (or his boss, if it's him)

    2. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

      I have seen it. Though not inside our (very small) company. But from customers, it's quite regular. Our sales people have been propositioned and had inappropriate texts/emails. Though I did ask, and no naked pics - though they have had ones meant to show off that the bloke had cash to splash.

      I also went for a job at a local company 15 years ago where the sales director asked me during my interview if I'd be OK sharing an office (as in the physical room) with 4 women. Asked as a serious question, not as a joke. I'm not sure if he thought femaleness was contagious...

      Anyway he made the Sun the next month for bullying someone at an interview to dance like a chicken. All I got was the sexism thing, and being asked "what do people say about you after you've left the room."

  7. cbars

    It is human nature to keep track of debts owed to you - (my personal belief to explain this) in a tribal society it would help you regain resources you 'lose' by 'charity'.

    It is ignorance and arrogance to equate financial investment/career progression/general business influence given to/used on behalf of an individual as a debt - and it is ludicrous in the extreme to assume that it can be repaid by sexual reciprocation.

    These men are socially and morally retarded. I say that as a man. I say that as a human.

    Edit: I mean retarded in the proper sense, not as a derogatory slur

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      > "...it is ludicrous in the extreme to assume that it can be repaid by sexual reciprocation."

      Sure, but it isn't clear that they assume it. They just try to get it, that's all we can be sure of. The assumption of entitlement isn't necessary.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Ok, so I read Ms Yeoh's blog post

    A couple reminders for the lads here:

    1. Do not shit where you eat.

    2. Colleagues, associates and the like, are to be treated with the utmost respect and professional decorum.

    You will be held in higher esteem in the eyes of others and will help you get rid of those insecurities that end up turning people into creeps.

    1. The First Dave

      Re: Ok, so I read Ms Yeoh's blog post

      And a minor corollary: don't invite a bunch of idiots to your own home, ESPECIALLY if you have to work with them afterwards.

  9. retired_in_london

    False harassment claims on the rise, employers must be vigilant

    Employers must be more vigilant than ever in developing and reinforcing anti-bullying policies in light of a significant spike in workplace bullying and harassment claims - many of them false, says Harmers Workplace Lawyers managing partner, Joydeep Hor.

    "Employers, first and foremost, have to be conscious that it's happening more and more," Hor told HR Daily.

    Claims, he says, have increased steadily over the last 10 years due to a growing awareness, improved education on the issue and an increase in avenues to report incidents. Ironically, he says, many employers that are now the subject of claims were responsible for implementing programs that saw this rise in awareness.

    However, Hor says he is surprised by the dramatic rise in the number of claims that prove either to be unsubstantiated or, in some instances, completely fabricated.

    "I've seen a significant increase in false bullying claims in recent months," he says. "Bullying and harassment claims [are] arguably at their highest level ever."

    https://www.hrdaily.com.au/nl06_news_selected.php?selkey=1106

    1. Jeremy Puddleduck

      Hey, RIL, fix the problem first and then deal with what is almost certainly a very low % of false claims. Just shouting about fake claims before even acknowledging there is a real problem just makes you look pathetic, and on the side of sexual harassers an abusers. Not a good side to be on.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      > False harassment claims on the rise, employers must be vigilant

      Firstly, and for the benefit of those who may not be familiar with how journalism works: going from zero instances of an event to one instance (or going from 51,226 to 51,227) will likely result in a headline of "[Blah] is on the rise!" in at least one publication. And they will argue, as they will have been taught in school, that they are being truthful and therefore not see an ethics problem. Furthermore, and with no intent to offend through generalisation, Australian journalism is not exactly known to be of the highest standard.

      For the record: I am an employer and our position is that if we end up with patently false accusations brought against us by an employee, then some aspect or other of the business is not going well. In any case, it would be our fault as managers and none else's.

      And with that said, perhaps the gentleman who posted the above would care to explain what this has to do with the matter of workplace harassment, which is what the article is about. Perhaps the gentleman has comprehension problems?

  10. retired_in_london

    Retaliation - Making it Personal

    Over the past decade, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has reported that retaliation is the most common issue alleged by federal employees and the most common discrimination finding in federal sector cases. Nearly half of all complaints filed during fiscal year (FY) 2013 were retaliation complaints, with 42 percent of findings of discrimination based on retaliation.

    In fact, retaliation has been the most frequently alleged basis of discrimination in the federal sector since fiscal year 2008. In addition, the number of discrimination findings based on a retaliation claim has outpaced other bases of discrimination.

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    it is much more than generational

    granted how you are brought up is extreamly influincial. my father fought discrimination before it was fashionable and refused to cow tow to superiors how directly beleaved and supported it. I was blessed to have the benifit of his guidance. my mother had her own issues which i wish i had not absorbed, I lost a good and trusted friend aand coworker because I inadvertantly spoke inappropriately. I was agast and appoligetic , but his felllings were hurt and he felt he could not get his concerns addressed so he chose to drop the incident and disasociated with me. the point i make is, society condones bad behaviors by not addressing and/or avoiding the problem. additionally, when one sees others "get away with it" they feel embolden to do likewise, especially seniors and respected people/friends. I totally agree the all or nothing approach is to draconian. it leaves no way to allow the perpatrator or the victem to resolve any issue with appropriate and reasionable resolve and leaves both parties with stigma weather appropriate or not. we need to address these issues early and appropriately to lessen the impact on the victim and correct the behavior in a way everyone sees it as fair to show not only those directly involved but coworkers that abhorant behaviors will not be tolerated! this will guide those with the proclivity to express these beehaviors in the workplace because they are not going to change where they are learned

  12. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Need clarification, Not blaming the victim

    Why was the randy CEO in the tech employee's apartment?

    Is there a general lack of boundaries in SV tech with always on connectivity? Combined with arrogance, poor social skills, and massive ego? Super douche bags.

    I was just watching "Ex Machina" and having a hard time with the asshole CEO character. Turned it off for the night to relax.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Need clarification, Not blaming the victim

      > Why was the randy CEO in the tech employee's apartment?

      Why don't you follow the links in the fucking article, mate? That's what they're there for. Is it too much work to click on them?

  13. LDS Silver badge

    Just Silicon Valley?

    Or sexism is still big part of our society? IMHO the issue here is that women working in tech have an head over their shoulder, a brain inside, and use it - so they're outing a problem that exists across many other sectors, just in some - i.e. sport, fashion, music, entertainment, media - it's thoroughly hidden as much as possible, to avoid to kill the golden eggs chicken.

    Meanwhile, images of women as "sexual prizes" are more and more used by media to attract people and make money - especially men (but also women using those images as role models). Often by the same media blaming sexism... then, how do you believe men with more money then neurons will act?

    Especially since we're returning to a primitive ape society where your power is measured on the size of your mating harem. We are a society that is obsessed about sex - and we are seeing the nasty outcome.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Just Silicon Valley?

      > Or sexism is still big part of our society?

      Yes, but some sectors are better / worse than others.

    2. Mark 85 Silver badge

      Re: Just Silicon Valley?

      Not just Silicon Valley. The news lately not only name politicians but news anchors. I'm sure there will be more articles for other careers coming. My impression and what I've heard about a various workplaces suggests this is pretty much a problem everywhere. Not just the US but worldwide.

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The hard part is determining if the complaint is real.

    Check out this story. I see no reason why a women's word is better than a man. As a vendor I have asked many engineers out to lunch when I am on site. That's what vendors do. I have had women engineers take it as pass.

    Anyway, even with a video showing otherwise, this women is still saying she was assaulted.

    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/06/judge-grants-ex-nfl-cheerleaders-request-to-delete-dozens-of-online-articles/

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The hard part is determining if the complaint is real.

      > As a vendor I have asked many engineers out to lunch when I am on site. That's what vendors do. I have had women engineers take it as pass.

      Please excuse the bluntness, but you can't be a very good vendor if you cannot even sell an invitation for lunch without being thought of as a creep.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: The hard part is determining if the complaint is real.

        Have you been to tecchie exhibitions? You'd think the same would apply but booth babes abound. Makes it bloody difficult to be a tecchie woman on a stand and be taken seriously. Hardly a surprise women are not expected to have a brain or be ready to put out if a trade show thinks they need women in their scanties to attract customers.

  15. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    What about women harassing women.

    I've seen it. Filing a complaint on that gets you nowhere.

  16. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Can you believe this woman's complaint?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPQCOtA8adM

    I have seen women in a factory environment be told to meet their boss at a hotel or be fired. I willing to bet that is still common in some companies. But just because I have seen it happen doesn't mean I will take a women's word for it with out some evidence. Mike Pence caught I a lot of grief because he won't have lunch with a women who isn't his wife. It's not sexist to cover your rear end.

  17. Martin 66
    Paris Hilton

    "In the latest example of snowballing allegations"

    I didn't read anything about snowballing !?!

    *look it up - icon has to be Paris

  18. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    what's the legal difference between a Gold Digger and a harassment victim in California?

    what's the legal difference between a Gold Digger and a harassment victim in California?

    None.

    A woman can deliberately and with spoken intent "sleep her way to the top" and claim "harassment" because "sex got her promotions". She can provably claim she was "treated differently" because of her availability. Even if that availability was all *positive* towards her career. Miss Blondie with no tech skills can bounce her way to the VP slot and still become the "victim" according to the courts and win again.

    And here's the fun part. Say the case is found to be without merit-as in, a woman deliberately falsely accuses a superior of harassment and the courts prove it to be a lie. Superior used to invite his team, with his accuser, to lunch. Now he's upset about it and doesn't invite her. Would YOU want to spend any time with someone who deliberately tried to destroy your life, job, family?

    Guess what? it's now provable "retaliation" and "treating her differently than the rest of the team explicitly because of the complaint". (saw this one personally myself at another job) and she wins THAT case.

    There are a few case examples like these that are trotted out during "harassment (prevention) training" around here every couple years.

    But it's not politically correct to ever assume that the "victims" are anything less than their *lawyers* claim, right? Sympathy means complete ignorance of human nature and acknowledgement that people of all races and genders are generally selfish and among all are lots of sh*tty people taking advantage of everything and everyone, then crying about it when caught.

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