back to article Gotcha, Tatcha! Thieves hide in servers to hoover up victims' bank card numbers mid-order

Cosmetics peddler Tatcha is warning customers after hackers were able to compromise its website and harvest payment card details as orders poured in. The US branch of the Japanese biz has been sending notices this month to customers whose card details were apparently stolen on January 8 of this year and discovered in April. " …

  1. leexgx

    this is why you should use credit cards online just way less hassle

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Facepalm

    What backend does tatcha.com run on?

    Apparently the tatcha.com ecommerce site runs on Magento and ExpressionEngine.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I would rather have my bank issue

    one time numbers so that the numbers cannot be re-used..

    never mind credit cards!

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