back to article Assange™ keeps his couch as Ecuador's president wins election

Julian Assange will sleep easy tonight – assuming he sleeps at all – after Ecuadorian president Lenín Moreno Garcés retained power. Opposition candidate Guillermo Lasso, of the Creando Oportunidades, party, had pledged to evict Assange from Ecuador's London embassy within 30 days of an election win. Lasso's planned to find …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Did Wikileaks release any info on the opponent?

    Where did the allegations of 'tax havens' come from, I wonder?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Did Wikileaks release any info on the opponent?

      Where did the allegations of 'tax havens' come from, I wonder?

      Yup. Given that any semblance of unbiased operation has now gone, you wonder who Wikileaks is targeting now to help one of their members evade justice, get a mortgage, force a raise or promotion - once you have people believe that you're doing something "journalistic" "for the community" the sky is the limit.

      Wasn't Robert Mugabe in need of some help? Oh no, wait, he just jails people. Not a WL client then, I guess.

    2. streaky
      Trollface

      Re: Did Wikileaks release any info on the opponent?

      Not handed off by Russia obviously, Assange would know. Because he knows all of Russia's ops obviously that's how he'd know. Oh, wait.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Did Wikileaks release any info on the opponent?

        The thing that worried me the most about Assange's certainty that Wikileaks didn't get the DNC material from Russia was that they're supposed to have to super-anonymous submission system that prevents them from knowing who is giving them material. So either that's not true, or Assange lied when he had no clue who the source was (and if so, was he lying to cover for Trump, or cover for the Russians?)

        Not that it wouldn't be trivial for Russia (or the CIA, or the Chinese, or Iran or Israel) to create some fake hacker like "Guccifer 2.0" to send the material to Wikileaks. If Russia didn't want the source known, they won't send it from a @kremlin.ru address, after all. If Assange thinks he could tell if whether it was really Russians behind a 'front man' submitting the material, lack of sunlight for five years has obviously driven him over the edge (I couldn't blame him, it would drive me batty as well!)

        1. streaky

          Re: Did Wikileaks release any info on the opponent?

          The thing that worried me the most about Assange's certainty that Wikileaks didn't get the DNC material from Russia

          Right? He's so absurdly confident that it wasn't Russia the only way he could be sure was if the Russians had told him to say it wasn't Russia. Even if it was Russia he still hasn't done anything wrong in US law. The only other way it could be not Russia, and he knows for sure AND he's worried about US extradition is if he's more talented as a hacker than the record suggests he is; in which case he really does have something to worry about.

          Thing about tradecraft is if your org is being infiltrated you're not supposed to know you're being infiltrated. Unless he's polygraphing everybody (which is itself massively unreliable) or subjecting them to fairly extensive torture - both of which are extremely unlikely - you're not *supposed* to know.

          If you believe Assange he's already been caught in one honeytrap (CIA), two isn't exactly out of the question.

  2. macjules Silver badge

    Dear Mr Assange ..

    I cordially invite you to leave the United Kingdom within 30 days (with or without your cat).

    1. VinceH

      Re: Dear Mr Assange ..

      I suspect 'challenge' would have been a more suitable word than 'leave' - because to leave this country, he'd first have leave the embassy - at which point he'll be arrested.

      1. Mark 85 Silver badge

        Re: Dear Mr Assange ..

        I suspect 'challenge' would have been a more suitable word than 'leave' - because to leave this country, he'd first have leave the embassy - at which point he'll be arrested.

        Well... they could wrap him in plastic and pack him in a large box for shipping. Ship him UPS or Fed-Ex to the place of his choice. Label it as a proper diplomatic packet and no one will be the wiser.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Dear Mr Assange ..

          Well... they could wrap him in plastic and pack him in a large box for shipping.

          That may lead to a debate about making sure it has air holes or not. And cargo holds can be *very* cold..

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Dear Mr Assange ..

            So ship it by rail.

        2. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

          Re: Dear Mr Assange ..

          Ship him UPS or Fed-Ex to the place of his choice.

          With a label that says "not needed on voyage"?

          I hear Antarctica is nice at this time of year.

  3. AIBailey

    Immunity

    I assume that any legitimate diplomat still has all the perks and benefits that come with the position, even when not stationed inside their embassy?

    Surely then, if it's costing Ecuador money having Assange as an unwanted lodger for the past few years, they could put the embassy up for sale (as it's really nothing more than a flat) and just move further up the road? The ambassador and associated staff can just stroll up the street to their new lodgings, but Assange would either have to break cover and try and run to the new location without being spotted, or would be fair game for the police to go in and collect him the instant his current residence loses its diplomatic status?

    1. GlenP Silver badge

      Re: Immunity

      Why bother? Just tell him he's no longer welcome and they've withdrawn any diplomatic protection then show him to the front door (having tipped off the Met first).

    2. Ben Tasker

      Re: Immunity

      > Surely then, if it's costing Ecuador money having Assange as an unwanted lodger for the past few years, they could put the embassy up for sale (as it's really nothing more than a flat) and just move further up the road?

      They could, but it's far cheaper to simply say "There's the door, leave now or you'll be removed".

      Either one would have a political price though, note that even the candidate that wants him gone said he'd try and find somewhere else that Assange could be moved to (quite how they'd achieve that is something else).

      Simply evicting him is something that the opposition would always exploit (even if they secretly agreed with the decision). Even if they want him gone, it's not nearly as simple as booting him out. In theory, they could do it now, on the basis that they've got a full term to try and score back political points, but it'd still be risky.

      1. Scorchio!!
        Devil

        Re: Immunity

        Easy; spike his warm drink, wait until sleeping, put him at the bottom of the stairs, let the Met deal with him. He was sleep walking. Hasta la vista, Julie.

    3. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

      Re: Immunity

      It would have been hard to transfer him to another emabassy. South American countries generally recognise the convention of diplomatic asylum. However this isn't part of the Vienna Conventions, which are the global 'rules' covering diplomats and embassies - so it's something that only applies if both governments agree. And our government don't, along with most others.

      In South America it's common practise for the outgoing government during a coup to hole up in various embassies, then (often delicate) negotiations over the next few months get them out of the country and into exile. Obviously you might really want to kill the ex el Presidente when you've just taken over, as that should make your new regime more secure. But, on the other hand, some ambitious colonel might soon be pitching you out on your ear, so having a way to get out suddenly looks a lot more attractive.

      Hence in South America, Assange would have sat in the Ecuadorian embassy for a few months, and a deal would probably have been quietly done to get him to Ecuador. In this country the government can't do that, as there's a court order to send him to Sweden.

      On a side note, if he stays there much longer, he might get his own clause in the Brexit deal. If we don't stay in the European Arrest Warrant system, then I don't know if the outstanding warrant would still apply (as the law was valid when it was issued), or if Sweden would have to apply for extradition. So there's something for him to look forward to...

      1. streaky

        Re: Immunity

        I don't know if the outstanding warrant would still apply

        He's still a bail skipper that would spend the time in jail on remand until it was all sorted out, which could take years.

  4. NorwegianBlue
    Holmes

    Lots of credible evidence that Lasso shelters his money in Panama

    Sources: Panama papers. Lots of journalism en Espanol. Here's one in English.

    http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/international/325442-media-cant-ignore-financial-scandal-in-ecuadors-presidential

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    is the Ecuadorian embassy on airbnb or is it only open to wankers with massive ego's?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Which other embassies are suitable? If I ever do a runner from the UK authorities, I don't want to be stuck there with Assange.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        I'd go for Nigeria because the country is full of scammers as it is.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Ecuadorian Embassy - 13 Reviews: **

      Did not expect to wake up and find I was sharing bed with some blond guy with six fingers and an Australian accent. Spent the rest of the night on couch. One star * would not stay again.

      1. Scorchio!!
        Angel

        Re: Ecuadorian Embassy - 13 Reviews: **

        You missed the bit about "poor hygiene", as reported by the girlies in Iceland. ;-)

      2. S4qFBxkFFg
        Joke

        Re: Ecuadorian Embassy - 13 Reviews: **

        "six fingers"

        Wut? Assange is in the Yakuza now?

        1. BebopWeBop

          Re: Ecuadorian Embassy - 13 Reviews: **

          Well with 6 fingers per hand he is obviously Yazuka+

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Ecuadorian Embassy - 13 Reviews: **

        Did you mean : Did not expect to wake up and find I was consensually having sex with some blond guy....

  6. This post has been deleted by its author

  7. Cuddles Silver badge

    Who retained what now?

    "Ecuadorian president Lenín Moreno Garcés retained power."

    No he didn't. Garces was elected to replace Rafael Correa who has been president for the last 9 years.

  8. Velv
    Trollface

    I'm surprised Trump hasn't asked Ecuador to hand him over yet, its just the sort of distraction he's likely to throw out there

    1. streaky

      Why would Trump give a toss? FWIW most people can't really figure what Assange has done wrong in US law else there'd have been a extradition request years ago..

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I'm surprised Trump hasn't asked Ecuador to hand him over yet

      You can only be surprised about that if you buy the myth that the US is after him in the first place, which is as unsubstantiated as 99% of Trump's tweets.

  9. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

    money it can ill-afford.

    "his use of Ecuador's embassy is costing the country money it can ill-afford."

    So why aren't they charging him rent? It's not as he's still paying hotel bills or anything. If Assange is short of cash, maybe he could rent his home out foe some income and pass some of that on to the Ecuadorians.

  10. Kaltern

    Remind me, why do the common folk hate Assange again?

    1. Brangdon

      Because he's an alleged rapist and undeniable cad.

    2. DropBear

      Because the simple folk are much better known for their desire to conform than their ability to think independently; when the pack leader du jour reaches for a stone, everyone else is eager to do the same lest they be judged different and cast out of the mob. Considering Assange is a) being continually dragged back into the limelight for another cheap potshot by the media and b) somewhat difficult to look up to these days and that c) the only thing mobs are good at is either cheering or lynching whoever crosses their path, the latter becomes inevitable. Hari Seldon could probably even point out the specific equation that makes it so.

  11. This post has been deleted by its author

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