back to article You want a 4-SIM mobe? Never mind why – your wish might come true

While recent modular phone experiments from Google and LG have crashed and burned, Motorola’s more sober effort is the one that’s paying off. The Lenovo-owned brand unveiled some new Moto Mods at the current Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, and gave a taste of where the accessory range could go. An Amazon Alexa Mod will …

  1. TheVogon

    "Never mind why"

    A combination of wife and several mistresses presumably.....

  2. Sampler

    Didn't you guys..

    ..recently post an article deriding the mods available for the Moto?

    1. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Re: Didn't you guys..

      They assessed the 1st generation of modules, and assessed them to be useful (the battery), humdrum (the speaker... handy for podcasts), largely redundant (the camera, one probably has a better compact zoom camera already), and not great (the projector). This article is about new modules.

      These existing modules neither prove nor disprove the utility of Moto's connector. What will decide its fate is market faith in Moto's continuing support on future models.

      A great shame this connector is proprietary- wider adoption by Androud would be a great differentiator from Apple. Imagine Psion-style keyboards, game pads, specialist sensors (3D scanning, IR imaging)... Heck, the one issue with Sony's QX 10 screenless camera for Android (same lens and sensor as the widely lauded RX 100 compact camera) was that its wireless connection to the host phone was flaky.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Didn't you guys..

        Once all Android phones have USB-C, what stops them from making USB-C "dock" devices similar to all the stuff available for the iPhone? Or for that matter, what stopped them from making micro-USB versions of the same?

        Why would anyone want a standard format for devices to actually plug directly into the phone, compromising the ability of OEMs to differentiate/improve upon the form factor? If there was always a "chin" / bezel below the screen that would be removed for modules, for example, you would have prevented the possibility to make phones with the screen extending all the way to the very bottom, for example.

        1. Dave 126 Silver badge

          Re: Didn't you guys..

          @ Doug

          Hiya. To clarify - the Moto Mods use a magnetic connector on the rear of the phone (for two way power low and high speed data), not the bottom or side is where a USB port would be. Your post suggests that you may be thinking of LG's failed modular system, which did require removing the 'chin' of the phone.

          LG's system was daft. Moto's system is technically good, but would be very good if it were opened out to other vendors. Whilst their physical connector is proprietry, it is built atop the open Greybus system, and Android nativity recognises most added modules as if they were a part of the host phone.

          Regards

        2. D@v3

          Re: DougS

          The problem with using a USB C 'dock' (or micro USB for that matter) is that the charge socket is not in the same place on all phones, some on the bottom, some on the side or even the top (also not all phones are the same shape) so you would still end up with different 'docks' for different brands / models. With iPhones they are in the same place, you only have to worry about the 'shape' of the phone and if it will fit in the dock.

          I personally quite like the idea of a 'modular' phone. Buy the basics at a reasonable price and add on the fancy extras as and when you want them. I like the way the Moto has done it, only thing is, what happens if you want the extra battery, and the camera? (or any other combination), but that is likely to be an issue with any way of doing this.

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