back to article A spanner in the works: Google's cloud database hits beta, gets prices

Google's close to plugging a long-standing gap in its public cloud, with its Cloud Spanner distributed relational database hitting public beta. In January, we noted that Cloud Spanner, first detailed in a 2012 white paper, had landed as alpha in 2014 but was yet to become a commercial offering. The beta announced February 14 …

  1. gerdesj Silver badge
    Childcatcher

    Aussie whingers?

    Err from the prices given then the (non HK) Chinese should be complaining not Aussies.

    Sadly I will never discover the joys of this thing. It turns out I am able to install and maintain my own database(s) and look after them.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Aussie whingers?

      Does your database automatically scale out, giving you 10^7 queries per second with five nines availability and global distribution?

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    If Google can get the word out, this is going to be big.

  3. Stretch

    Google can't be trusted with anything like this. They will randomly remove the entire database tech in a few short months, saying you were wrong for using it in the first place.

  4. leon clarke

    Cool

    I can't wait until Amazon or Azure has got something like that.

    I really feel that we should be able to have 'have cake and eat it' databases, and we should have had them for some time. Right now, this is a really cool feature which Google has but the others don't have. But even if it's brilliant, I'd feel a lot happier using it when Amazon or Azure have something that at least almost competes. I know that changing cloud provider would always be a nightmare, but I'd feel happier knowing that there is another cloud provider that does have roughly the right building blocks.

    And just because I want to have my cake and eat it when it comes to databases (and cakes) doesn't mean I think this is applicable everywhere; notably it isn't a viable foreign policy.

    1. Tom Chiverton 1

      Re: Cool

      Hmm ?

      I though it just sounded like an expensive version of AWS RDS ?

      1. leon clarke

        Re: Cool

        It seems to me like it'll scale to really big distributed things, in the way that RDS doesn't.

        If you need that, it would be worth paying for.

        If you want the Google answer to RDS, that's Cloud SQL, and is priced about the same as RDS

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Cool

          Only caveat there is that AWS RDS gives you six database engines to choose from, not just MySQL. More flexible which explains my preference towards AWS as I've several tools to generate the code from models here. This is very useful tailoring codebase towards client requirements (i.e. what flavor are they capable of handling with their resources). Other than that, agreed.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Cool

          Exactly. Seems like other commentors are not getting the "holy shit" of Google Spanner. This isn't another RDB. The banks have been after Google to release Spanner for years because they knew Google had it in their back pocket. The net of it is that RDBs are really good at data consistency and really terrible at scaling. NoSQL DBs are just the opposite, really good at scaling and do not have ACID properties like a traditional RDB so you can't run a transaction system on them, unless you don't care about your data being consistent. If you want to do something that requires crazy scale and also has ACID properties, you were smack out of luck and had to fragment the DB in some work around. Google has had an RDB which scales to PBs of data and thousands of nodes across a single instance (runs their ad auctions globally) with ACID properties of a traditional RDB like Oracle, DB2, etc.... how they get data consistency at that scale, I'm sure I don't know. Google magic. I plan to read up on it.... Anyway, that's why I wrote that if Google gets the word out, this is going to be huge. Nothing can do what Spanner does and everyone would like to do what Spanner does.

  5. Rural area satellite.

    A full RDBMS for hire capable of 1 million TPS? i wonder what the market for it will be, how long it will take for mega-players to adopt it.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Banks, eCommerce, utilities... anyone who has a mainframe and anyone who has an Oracle RAC instance. Probably also use cases for combining 400 SQL DBs into Spanner with BigTable.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Spanner and Hadoop

    With the capabilities of Spanner being similar ot better than Hadoop, I wonder if this will not disrupt and impact Hadoop sales and adoption?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Spanner and Hadoop

      Spanner is Google's replacement for Hadoop for OLTP. The issue with Hadoop is that it has eventual consistency of data so it isn't suitable to a traditional RDB workload, like running an eCommerce service or the like. Spanner is the scale of Hadoop with the data consistency, ACID properties of Oracle. I would think Hadoop will be around because it does more than OLTP.... Oracle RAC, DB2 replacement is probably more of the use case... and any new workload of that sort. Huge relational DBs.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Spanner and Hadoop

      Google's alternative to Hadoop is BigQuery (i.e. for analytics workloads rather than OLTP)

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