back to article Like it or not, here are ALL your October Microsoft patches

Microsoft is kicking off a controversial new security program this month by packaging all of its security updates into a single payload. The October security release introduces Redmond's new policy of bundling all security bulletins as one download. While more convenient for end users, who now get just one bundle, the move …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Thumb Up

    Here's November's patch schedule

    MS16-167 - Remove remnants of Microsoft Bob; that Bob'll do anything for cache. Dirty old Bob. Filthy Bob.

    MS16-172 - Remove undocumented /ut option (mark files with '!' that have been 'telemetry uploaded' from your HD to Microsoft) from dir command.

    MS16-179 - Remove the 45Gb of shit we downloaded without asking you.

    MS16-184 - Remove 'SadNad is a basic tool' from subst command help text.

    ...and December's:

    MS16-192 - Remove Windows 10 from machine.

    MS16-200 - Install Mint.

  2. hplasm
    Gimp

    Here are a bunch of patches.

    Here are a bunch of patches.

    Here are a bunch of patches which will fix some bugs.

    Here are a bunch of patches which will fix some bugs and introduce more.

    Here are a bunch of patches.

    All together now-

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Have they fixed the samba networking bugs yet? If not why not?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Windows

      Have they fixed the DR DOS compatibility bugs they introduced a quarter of a century ago, yet? If not why not?

    2. Dazed and Confused
      Joke

      > Have they fixed the samba networking bugs yet? If not why not?

      It took them ages to carefully create all these bugs to try and stop people using a free alternative to their product. Why would they want to remove them?

    3. phuzz Silver badge
      Linux

      If it's SMB1 then probably not, even Microsoft can't be bothered to support that shit. Just disable v1 and move to 2 or 3.

      Think of it like telnet, you only use telnet on a secure, and ideally separate network, and that's only if there's absolutely no way to use something like SSH instead.

      1. Tom Paine

        It's not.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Dear Microsoft.

    I don't have anything Adobe installed on my machine, so why am I forced to download code to patch a product that doesn't exist?

    I don't have the Edge browser, so why am I forced to download code to fix what doesn't exist on my system?

    I don't have any MS Office Suite installed, so why do I need to patch vulnerabilities that apply to it?

    Your ram-it-all-down-my-throat patching method means I now have to download multiple megabytes of unnecessary code to patch programs I don't have, just so I can get the code to fix the ones I do. Who's brilliant idea was that? Take them out back & kick their arse for being so monumentally stupid. I pay for my bandwidth & your new patching scheme costs me real money. When can I expect reimbursement? Because I sure didn't agree to have my bandwidth wasted on crap I niether want nor need.

    Please go back to releasing single patches rather than this lump of shite. I can't afford to let it cripple my screen reader & YOU can't afford the lawsuit if you cause my computer to become unuseable.

    *Double handed rude gesture*

    Signed, a pissed off MS customer whom has a lawyer.

    1. David Roberts Silver badge

      Re: Dear Microsoft.

      Do let us know how your lawsuit goes on.

      Just in case Microsoft also have a lawyer.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Headmaster

      Re: Dear Microsoft.

      ...who has a lawyer.

      Although I'd have preferred "...with a lawyer." myself.

    3. J__M__M

      Re: Dear Microsoft.

      Signed, a pissed off MS customer whom has a lawyer who, sorry whom, would laugh at working on a contingency basis so I'd be looking at $200 an hour billed in 15 min increments for every email, fax, and phone call he can dream up.

      Good luck with that.

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Dear Microsoft.

      Signed, a pissed off MS customer with a large axe and a maniacal expression?

    5. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: Dear Microsoft.

      "Signed, a pissed off MS customer whom has a lawyer."

      I'm pleasantly surprised at the number of commentards who (not whom) spotted that one but here's an upvote for a splendid rant.

    6. Tom Paine

      Re: Dear Microsoft.

      I can't afford to let it cripple my screen reader & YOU can't afford the lawsuit if you cause my computer to become unuseable.

      These statements are mutually exclusive. They can't both be correct... I suspect it's the second one that'll trip you up if you try it.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Dear Microsoft.

        Plenty of no-win-no-fee shysters in the world. Perhaps we should all simultaneously shyster up.

  5. Tomato42
    Boffin

    Goodwill

    Yes Microsoft, after the whole Windows 10 forced update fiasco you sure have a lot of goodwill still to burn, sure you do.

    Protip: the rest of world didn't interpret that variable as a signed, you're in the negative

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Gates Horns

      Goodwill hunting?

      There must be some goodwill still lurking somewhere... where are you, you little bastards... come to daddy...

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Scoop! here's the all-hands memo behind this policy

    Fellow Microserfs,

    Recent surveys show a steady fall those who identify our company as "a shower of cunts I wouldn't piss on if they were on fire", commensurate with a rise in "Microsoft? Oh wow! I remember them!" Your leadership team introduces with pride a new patching regime designed to reverse both of these trends...

  7. Compression Artifact
    Devil

    Is wheel-spinning replacing nagware as the new Windows 10 incentive?

    As the WIndows 10 nagware is being phased out, the time Windows 7 update spends in 0% completed mode is ramping up. In the previous three updates it's gone from 5 hours to about 9 hours to just over 20 hours. I'm guessing that this month it'll be a couple of days.

    A web search shows that thousands of people are complaining. There are several proposed workarounds, some of which I know don't work and some of which look dangerous.

    1. John Tserkezis

      Re: Is wheel-spinning replacing nagware as the new Windows 10 incentive?

      "I'm guessing that this month it'll be a couple of days."

      And shortly after that, your next scheduled payment will have to be made before the delays continue.

    2. Wade Burchette Silver badge

      Re: Is wheel-spinning replacing nagware as the new Windows 10 incentive?

      I had that problem too. So I manually downloaded and installed KB3172605. It fixed the problem. No more waiting for days for updates to download, no more 100% CPU usage by svchost.exe. But, of course, that fix broke Windows Server Essentials connector. This is the best backup program I've seen so I want to keep it working. So I removed KB3172605.

      And the problem returned. So I disabled Windows Update, waited until the next patch Tuesday, and installed KB3172605 again. I made a note of which updates were out and uninstalled KB3172605. Surprisingly, the problem went away.

      What was going on is that KB3172605 is a collection of patches, which included several updates that broke the Server Essentials connector. This is a Microsoft program, and Windows updates break it. Why can't Microsoft get their own programs to be compatible with their own updates?

      1. bombastic bob Silver badge

        Re: Is wheel-spinning replacing nagware as the new Windows 10 incentive?

        "Why can't Microsoft get their own programs to be compatible with their own updates?"

        something about knowing the difference between THIS and THIS.

        /me realizes where 1st photo is located, now thinks it's funny

    3. MrKrotos

      Re: Is wheel-spinning replacing nagware as the new Windows 10 incentive?

      Maybe you try fixing that with the fixes that fix that issue?

      https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/kb/3125574

    4. Eddy Ito

      Re: Is wheel-spinning replacing nagware as the new Windows 10 incentive?

      There is a fix here however if things are going to be rolled up into one giant ball of snot it's going to be a bit more difficult to fix when, not if, the slowdowns resume.

  8. Herby

    This just in....Data limits for DSL and cable modem users

    Yes, you heard it here. In one instance Comcast has put in a 1Tbyte limit, and AT&T has also put in a 1Tbyte limit for monthly downloads. From the looks of it they may be trying to get in on the action of charging for the Microsoft updates.

    So, do Comcast & AT&T give kickbacks from the overcharges back to Microsoft for automatically downloading the patches.

    Just sayin'

    Is 1Tbyte enough for Microsoft updates? I'll never know, don't use it at home.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: This just in....Data limits for DSL and cable modem users

      Someone from BT here in the UK will be sure to be telling us about their 'wonderful, massive, over generous, technically challenging' 10Mbps USO (only a 'requestable' Universal Service Obligation) in terms of this US 1TB Cap by Comcast.

      A USO you can politely request (but no guarantee of getting) from BT in the UK which will probably see BT through till 2030 and see BT's browbeaten rural subscribers suffer indefinitely till then at least, when the last one still requesting/waiting will likely get enabled the day before that deadline (as install dates get moved further and further back. In the process, protecting their copper carcass, just on that promise)

      Sounds a lot a 1TB Cap, BT would tell you with a 10Mbps BT USO you could download 1TB 'cap' over 10 days (if you're lucky), fully utilising a 10Mbps connection, working flat out 24/7.

      If you get say 4Mbps-8Mbps on a good day, are you really going to go to all that trouble of requesting 10Mbps, to be told its £15,000 to get to 10Mbps. BT know this, thats why they aren't objecting to the {pointless} 'requestable' 10Mbps USO.

      Hope the Government realise how long unpatched Windows machines will sit connected to the internet downloading Microsoft/Apple Updates, with their drive towards Gov eServices.

      Generous 'requestable' crumbs at best, make do you Rural Plebs!

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: This just in....Data limits for DSL and cable modem users

      "Yes, you heard it here. In one instance Comcast has put in a 1Tbyte limit"

      How are you supposed to cope with that?!

      I download at least 1 TB a week. That's only approx. 2MB a sec. on average - so nothing really in terms of speed / bandwidth.

      1. fidodogbreath Silver badge

        Re: This just in....Data limits for DSL and cable modem users

        I download at least 1 TB a week

        Dang, that's a lot of pr0n...

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: This just in....Data limits for DSL and cable modem users

          "Dang, that's a lot of pr0n..."

          Or a few dozen ripped BluRays...

  9. Nate Amsden

    so do these new patch bundles

    really include everything ? I mean if I did a clean install of windows 7 and got this month's update it would have every update since windows 7 came out ? Or if for example I am current today and run updates in 1 year does it install one round of updates or is it 12 rounds of updates or somewhere in between?

    I'm no windows guy, but I did have an interesting(if you can call it that) experience installing a fresh win2008 R2 last week, the ISO image was 3 years old I think, it installed a bunch of patches, then got to SP1 (why SP1 didn't include all of those other patches I don't know). SP1 wouldn't install, strange error, and the help said nothing. Fortunately I was able to manually download a 2GB ISO file which contained SP1 and that installed flawlessly, allowing windows update to continue on it's patch frenzy, I counted roughly 330 patch IDs installed after it was all done. Took all day but it was working in the end.

    Maybe someday MS will be able to download all of the patches in one go, I do kind of miss the NT4 days where at least I believed at the time the service packs were in fact rollups of all other patches(up to that point), and there was of course multiple SPs (at least 4 in the case of NT4 I think). Though overall stability of NT4 is really part of what drove me to linux on the desktop in the end.

    It's really rare a MS patch causes issues for stuff I do(can't remember last time that happened), though my windows use cases are very limited.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: so do these new patch bundles

      I can't say for sure if they do or not, but there were four patches listed in my Updates window & at least one of them was One Hundred Nineteen megabytes. If that's any indication of things to come then it appears as if MS has indeed put all their eggs in one basket & opted to ram that bastard down our throats.

    2. flilotuk

      Re: so do these new patch bundles

      NT 4.0 got all the way up to Service Pack 6a!

    3. Sven Coenye

      Re: so do these new patch bundles

      Want more fun? Try upgrading IE8 to IE11. (The IE11 download page rejects IE8 visits...)

      1. J. Cook Silver badge
        Mushroom

        Re: so do these new patch bundles

        "Want more fun? Try upgrading IE8 to IE11. (The IE11 download page rejects IE8 visits...)"

        ... only if you call an aneurysm 'fun'. I managed to use a second machine and a thumb drive to get around that. (at least the stand alone installer is still available...)

      2. Hans 1
        Coffee/keyboard

        Re: so do these new patch bundles

        Thanks, I think you forgot the Fail icon!

    4. LDS Silver badge

      Re: so do these new patch bundles

      The plan is to add older patches to the latest rollup, so installing a new machine and patching it should require less patches to install. This also mean the rollup grow larger and larger. Windows Update (and WSUS, if set so) can also use "express" installation files that should be smaller.

      When installing from an old CD, it's usually better to install the required service pack from a downloaded setup, otherwise Windows Update will install anyway a bunch of patch before the service pack. Same for IE, otherwise Windows will first patch the installed version, and only later will display the availability of the latest version.

      Don't know how long you used NT4, but in those years (1996-99) Linux was really far worse too than it is today, NT4 for the time was a solid OS (we were running it mostly on IBM hardware, back then), and, but the big SCSI bug in SP3 (or 4?) never really had issues.

      1. Tom Paine

        Re: so do these new patch bundles

        Presumably there's an upper bound to the size of the update blob. If there are five separate monthly updates to msbob.dll, they're not going to ship all five; they'll ship the last, most up-to-date version. Right, kids?

    5. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: so do these new patch bundles

      The Cumulative KBs via Windows Update will be delta patches (download sizes will match the machines requirements, to what earlier Cumulative Monthly KBs are installed) .

      The offline downloadable Cumulative KBs through the Windows Catalog will be in 'roll up' form, i.e. include all Cumulative Monthly KBs from now on, like say Apple Combo 10.11.6 Patch, all updates from 10.11.0 to 10.11.6.

    6. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: so do these new patch bundles

      so do these new patch bundles really include everything ?

      Yes. They even include the ones that will bluescreen your system because you cannot forego a decades old tradition, and the sheer volume of downloads worldwide is likely to be equivalent of a DDoS attack on the whole Interwebs.

      It is the Trump of software: a lot of noise, frightfully offensive and absolutely not interested in your actual needs unless pretending means more votes sales.

  10. Tromos

    Like it or not

    That would be 'not' then.

  11. JustNiz

    The VERY suspicious thing is that these are all excessively large downloads for what Microsoft claim are just fixing what would almost certainly be a few one-liners in some system DLLs.

    1. Tom Paine

      They're not "patches"

      ...not in the patch(1) sense, anyway. A one-line change in a big library means shipping the whole recompiled binary.

  12. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

    Offering Odds

    Anyone offering odds on how badly these updates will BSOD many installations?

    1. Mikel

      Re: Offering Odds

      I can't think of a single small business that doesn't have at least one blackballed patch that breaks something operationally critical.

    2. phuzz Silver badge

      Re: Offering Odds

      I reckon those odds will go down over time, because more people will be starting from fully patched systems (which is the only thing MS tests against), rather than one where they've patched things at random based on the phase of the moon and some dubious advice they misinterpreted on a forum somewhere.

  13. Chet Mannly

    No doubt this has been brought in to stop people like me from manually uninstalling all their spyware, sorry telemetery, that they have been trying to install on my win 7 machine - so I can have the full "we're watching you" experience that all the lucky win10 people get...

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Windows 7 Updates 12 hour window of opportunity.

    Is there anyone running retail Windows 7SP1 today, that hasn't left an unpatched Windows 7 machine for 12 hours overnight connected to the Internet waiting for Updates? (OK, WSUS users). Plenty of users are still unaware its fixable using KB3172605. Without installing this KB they are left in limbo land.

    It might look and run like Windows 7SP1, but is it?

    Given Windows 7 updates stopped working pretty much on release of Windows 10, began working again after 13/09/2016, is this Microsoft up to its past anit-competitive tricks again, to skew the market in favour of Windows 10.

    MS know Windows 7 will be a tough nut to kill off, but leaving unpatched Windows 7 machines exposed for 12 hours, because Windows 10 became the priority, shows what MS will do, when they also know NSA/GCHQ + others are actively looking for such machines to compromise.

    You also have to ask, was that 12 hour wait for Windows Updates, a 'window' of opportunity en masse by design, enforced on MS, to allow NSA/GCHQ 'a sort of we'll turn our back - access' en masse. Each machine would have a beacon, saying {unpatched Win7 Machine checking for updates- I'm right here}, so to speak.

    1. Gray
      Holmes

      Re: Windows 7 Updates 12 hour window of opportunity.

      Which begs the question, I suppose... but I'll ask it anyway.

      Is there a "safe" version of Windows for unsophisticated home users?

      Is there a "stable" version of Windows for unsophisticated home users, that can be relied upon to run for, perhaps a year? Without failure or replacement or forced upgrade?

      What is the unsophisticated home user expected to do, in this "brave new world" of Microsoft?

      1. Mystic Megabyte
        Stop

        Re: Windows 7 Updates 12 hour window of opportunity.

        >>What is the unsophisticated home user expected to do, in this "brave new world" of Microsoft?

        The only sensible option is to install Linux Mint. Because of it's inbuilt insecurity, Microsoft is finished.

        1. F0rdPrefect

          Re: The only sensible option is to install Linux Mint.

          Unless you rely on software for work that is not supported under anything other than Windows.

          And you have support people running that software under Windows.

          In that case any other operating system is a non starter. Well, not for the next 23.5 months - roll on retirement.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Windows 7 Updates 12 hour window of opportunity.

          "The only sensible option is to install Linux Mint. Because of it's inbuilt insecurity"

          A good reason not to install it, surely...

    2. Tom Paine

      Re: Windows 7 Updates 12 hour window of opportunity.

      You think the NSA / GCHQ / ImmunitySec can reverse an update, find the vuln, and develop and deploy a reliable, weaponised exploit in 12 hours?

      I fear you are mistaken.

      So much easier for them to have their own vuln dev groups -- a redundant array of inexpensive Tavis Ormandys. Well, wannabe Tavises -- there's only one T.O. ...

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Windows 7 Updates 12 hour window of opportunity.

      For the downvoters, you really haven't heard of:

      ZERODIUM - The Premium Exploit Acquisition Platform

      www.zerodium.com/

      Exploits which are bought for a price (in the millions) and sold to Governments to exploit at their leisure, including NSA/GCHQ.

  15. Mikel

    Is this it?

    Is this finally the thing that will get people off the train to crazy town that is Windows?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Is this it?

      Its a crazy town with one hell of a marketing budget, some would say a bottomless pit.

      1. hplasm
        Childcatcher

        Re: Is this it?

        Welcome to Crazy Town!

        You'll never leave!

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        A bottomless pit

        "Its a crazy town with one hell of a marketing budget, some would say a bottomless pit."

        Which do you mean, town or budget?

  16. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Its an eye opener, when you start reading the details of these KB Patches.

    I realise Windows Update Patches are not the most interesting thing to read about but once you do make the effort to read the details of each KB, boy - its an eye opener to what can be done to your Windows machine as regards attack vectors.

    No wonder Microsoft don't give the detail directly with the KB in Windows Update.

  17. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    So if one of the patches within the big payload is borked

    What's the user to do? Will Microsoft re-release the entire payload?

    We need lawsuits against Microsoft. And a US government which is not beholden to its lobbyists.

  18. LDS Silver badge

    Microsoft split brain: WSUS can't now automatically approve only the security patch

    Today I found my WSUS - which is set to automatically approve security patches only, approved both the "security only" patch, and the "security+other stuff" patch, because both are marked as a security patch. The KB article says:

    "If you use update management processes other than Windows Update and automatically approve all Security updates classifications for deployment, note that both the Security Only Quality Update 3185331 and the Security Monthly Quality Rollup for the month 3192392 will be deployed. We recommend that you review your update deployment rules to ensure the desired updates are deployed."

    Just AFAIK you have no way in WSUS to modify your update deployment rules to achieve that - but switching to manual approval, because both have the same classification and severity.

    When a company gets into a situation where changes like this are not coordinated among all the interested groups - in this case WSUS would have needed to be updated before the new patch regime - you understand it has very big management issues and it's no longer a single company but many groups fighting each other.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Microsoft split brain: WSUS can't now automatically approve only the security patch

      I wouldn't risk having ANYTHING set to automatically approve, madness!

      I have a sub set of servers and workstations (VM's) that I use just for testing updates, and NEVER roll them out on day one!

      And this ISN'T just a windows issue, patch management for the MILLION + 1 Linux distros is FAR, FAR worse. Our Linux's support guys have many more problems with their Linux workstations that we do with our Windows ones and they have a quarter of the number

      1. LDS Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft split brain: WSUS can't now automatically approve only the security patch

        We outweighed the risk of having to manually approve each security patch, with the risks of one of it creating troubles. In *our* situation was decided it was better to approve automatically security patches *only*. That WSUS is for our department only. That decision was based on what we do, how we do it, the skills of our personnel, the workload of people administering our network, and the risks we could face. In another situation, the same process could have led to a wholly different decision.

        Anyway, the point was that WSUS can't handle the new patch scheme. Moreover, if both patches are approved, Windows will install both, even if one is a superset of the other. I believe a company like Microsoft could and should have addressed this far better, and coherently. But coherence is going down the kitchen sink in many, many software solutions - not only Windows.

    2. Reginald Marshall

      Microsoft empty promises: IE still required for Update Catalog

      The blog post which announced the patching overhaul, with the juicily Doublespeak title "Further simplifying servicing models for W7/8.1", stated that a separate security-only patch set would be available each month, although not via Windows Update, but the semi-obscure Microsoft Update Catalog, then and now a throwback to the early noughties which requires IE and ActiveX (yes, that ActiveX) for what is basically a glorified FTP server.

      The "and now" part is pertinent: the same blog post promised that the ActiveX requirement will be removed "soon". Two months later, it still isn't: try visiting the site in anything but IE, and it will redirect you to a page saying that IE is required. Er, Microsoft? Are you trying to make this deliberately difficult for those who don't want to be force-fed the whole opaque load of unrelated crap? (The question is rhetorical, obviously.)

      What's even more astounding is that the non-IE promise is not even new: here's an earlier incarnation (scroll down a couple of paragraphs), plus a workaround for non-IE browsers. The "screw you, we're Microsoft" spirit is as strong as ever over at Redmond.

  19. Hans 1
    Boffin

    Who can come up with the real reason for this change?

    My gut-feeling is the following:

    1. MS changes WSUS to automatically install patch

    2. Customer changes it back to "ask"

    3. cf 1, cf 2, cf 1, cf 2

    4. MS is sick and tired of doing 1. and decides to bundle everything, rendering the setting useless!

    @AC: Linux update woes ? Not seen any since 2006. I have had issues when I "upgraded" to a Linux with systemd, but regular updates ? Nope, none here ... good thing is, I get them very regularly, the better even thing is, I hardly ever have to reboot. As for FreeBSD update woes, been using FreeBSD since version 4.2, have seen none.

    1. LDS Silver badge
      Headmaster

      Re: Who can come up with the real reason for this change?

      WSUS is the update *server*, and doesn't install patches, it just provides the approved one for download. WUA is the update *agent/client* (the name was changed, although internally is still called WUA), running on the client, which contacts the configured update server, download required patches and install them.

  20. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    On the nth day of christmas...

    ...Microsoft gave to me.

    A third of the way filling those 12 days me thinks.

    "MS16-118 is a cumulative update for Internet Explorer to address 11 security vulnerabilities, including six remote code execution flaws, three information disclosure vulnerabilities, and two elevation of privilege conditions."

  21. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    How big?

    So how big is this bundled update? I know in the past that MS Office updates in particular have been very large. I'm on a service with a download limit, so I don't want to be downloading huge patches for software I don't have. If we end up in the realm of multi-gigabyte patch downloads every month, then I'll be switching my remaining Windows machines to Linux. Sometimes Linux distros publish new patches on an almost daily basis, but at least they're small and quick to install.

    1. Bob Camp

      Re: How big?

      Well, you can go into your network settings and say you have a metered connection. That will disable automatic updates in Windows 10.

      Or if you have any other version of Windows 10 besides Home, you can disable automatic updates using the group policy editor.

      1. I am the liquor Silver badge

        Re: How big?

        Disabling updates and running an unpatched OS isn't a very attractive alternative.

  22. Florida1920
    Facepalm

    Why do they call it "Patch Tuesday"

    When I only ever get notified on the following Wednesday? I even did a Check for Updates last night, U.S. Eastern time.

  23. earl grey
    Unhappy

    screwed my pc

    i'm rolling it back out (assumes recovery point is actually going to work).

  24. Tobster

    Not a good start Microsoft!!

    KB3185331 & KB3192392 cause the following error in SCOM 2012 Ops Mgr Console > Montoring node > Windows Computers

    Faulting application name: Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Monitoring.Console.exe, version: 7.1.10226.1239, time stamp: 0x57bd213f

    Faulting module name: ntdll.dll, version: 6.3.9600.18438, time stamp: 0x57ae642e

    Exception code: 0xc0000374

    Fault offset: 0x00000000000f1b70

    Faulting process id: 0x1844

    Faulting application start time: 0x01d224e87fd35f23

    Faulting application path: D:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center 2012 R2\Operations Manager\Console\Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.Monitoring.Console.exe

    Faulting module path: C:\Windows\SYSTEM32\ntdll.dll

    Report Id: d8ac7ac4-90db-11e6-812a-00155d01f5aa

    Faulting package full name:

    Faulting package-relative application ID:

  25. Luiz Abdala
    Windows

    My motherboard threw a hissy fit over the last batch.

    - The options "update and reboot" and "update and shutdown" won't go away after I use them and the machine powers down / reboots / does its thing.

    - Eventually it goes straight to beeping non-stop instead of rebooting, like if someone had stuck a letter on the keyboard and filled the buffer to crash, causing the BIOS to get angry and beep. It happened while I was at work and I thought it was the fire alarm as I got home.

    - It wakes up from suspend without human input. No, nobody touched the keyboard. No, there is no wind pushing the mouse. No, I don't have poltergeists. No, no earthquake zone either.

    - I didn't change anything. No programs installed, except for those that update themselves.

    I think I need a new motherboard.

    1. Captain Badmouth
      Coat

      Re: My motherboard threw a hissy fit over the last batch.

      "It wakes up from suspend without local human input..."

      Fixed.

      Mines the one with "winx spyware for dummies" in the pocket, thanks.

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