Anyone dealt with icann before?

This topic was created by ATeal .

  1. ATeal

    Anyone dealt with icann before?

    There's a domain name I want. It's not like Ziperdedoo.com it's the name of what it does, and it's been parked for over a decade, currently it hosts a circular redirect. Wayback machine is how I know it's been marked ALL that time.

    The guy behind it wants to use it to "advertise" a "solution" that quite literally makes stuff worse (this isn't my judgment, there is absolutely no need for it) but has no intent of developing it.

    He also claims to have 25k other domains which he sells.

    I'm UK, so suppose I go for thing.co.uk or thing.uk for now say, is there any grounds, now or in that .uk future where I could ask (an approved dispute solving body of) ICANN to step in and go "look, you've not done anything with it ever" or something?

    I've read https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/policy-2012-02-25-en and it seems to me like it only covers someone registering an upcoming product. Like if I were to register, I dunno, dietpepsi.com and sell something I called dietpepsi.com that was nothing to do with pepsi.

    I'm not sure what to do.

    There are no "i"s to switch to "y"s in the name, nor "er" to change to "r" (this is a joke, mocking the current state of things)

  2. jake Silver badge

    Unfortunately ...

    ... as long as the name-squatter pays the bill, it owns the name.

    Note that I don't necessarily agree with this reality ...

  3. Known Hero

    Was discussing this recently, Personally I feel domains are way to cheap atm, Make the minimum renewal price £20 per year, and your problem with name squatters is solved.

    Yeah I know we all don't want to be paying more money each year either but common £20 is not alot of money, unless your buying in bulk.

    1. #define INFINITY -1

      Please, no.

    2. Phil W

      "Make the minimum renewal price £20 per year, and your problem with name squatters is solved."

      Not really, a lot of domains like described by the OP where the domain is owned but is being used for absolutely nothing and has no working services are owned by businesses, in some cases very large businesses. Perhaps for a now defunct brand, or a company they've previously bought out.

      Even if they are not intentionally holding on to it in case they want to use it again, a £20 (or realistically anything less than a few hundred pounds, which rules out personal users having domains really) isn't going to solve the problem.

      In a very large business the person responsible for arranging the domain won't care much about the cost anyway regardless of how high it is assuming they even still work there, and the finance department getting regular invoices for £20 if it's been previously authorised is not likely to be sufficient to raise any questions.

      What it really needs is a method for claiming domains like this. It would be a bit long winded but a system where you can pay a fee to put in a claim on a domain, something substantial to deter abuse but not totally unaffordable, the registrar then contacts the current owner using their registered contact information say 4 times over 12 months to ask them to confirm they are still using it. Should they fail to responded after all those attempts then the domain can be transferred to the claimant.

      Seems fair enough to me? If you can't respond to 4 requests in 12 months or haven't updated you domain registration details in over 12 months you don't deserve to keep your domain anyway.

      1. #define INFINITY -1

        Eminently reasonable, and therefore impossible for icann.

        Back to OP - I haven't gone into how much regulation icann has over delegated names; I would've thought it was ultimately .uk that had control. That's how it should be imo.

  4. jordandevin

    Anyone dealt with icann before?

    All ICANN-accredited registrars follow a uniform dispute resolution policy. Under that policy, disputes over entitlement to a domain-name registration are ordinarily resolved by court litigation between the parties claiming rights to the registration. Once the court rules on who is entitled to the registration, the registrar will implement that ruling. In disputes arising from registrations allegedly made abusively (such as "cyber-squatting" and ?cyber-piracy"), the uniform policy provides an expedited administrative procedure to allow the dispute to be resolved without the cost and delays often encountered in court litigation. In these cases, you can invoke the administrative procedure by filing a complaint with one of the dispute-resolution service providers.

  5. jordandevin

    Anyone dealt with icann before?

    Eminently reasonable, and therefore impossible for icann.

    Back to OP - I haven't gone into how much regulation icann has over delegated names; I would've thought it was ultimately .uk that had control. That's how it should be imo.

  6. jacobwilliam1985

    Anyone dealt with icann before?

    One of ICANN's key commitments is to promote competition in the domain name market while ensuring Internet security and stability. New generic Top-Level Domains (gTLDs) help achieve that commitment by paving the way for increased consumer choice by facilitating competition among registry service providers. Soon entrepreneurs, businesses, governments and communities around the world will be able to apply to operate a Top-Level Domain registry of their own choosing.

  7. waltercarroll

    While we caution potential registrants to be skeptical of claims that a name can be “guaranteed” names, ICANN supports programs that are set up to help interested parties keep track of when the new domain names will be available. For example, some Registrars are providing programs that allow potential registrants to subscribe to status updates on new gTLDs.

  8. This post has been deleted by a moderator

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