back to article Wi-Fi banana all grown up, now a suit-wearing enterprise wall slab

A network engineer who made headlines when he hooked people into his company Wi-Fi network with a banana has rebuilt the system as an enterprise-ready touchscreen device. Last month, El Reg brought you the story of Stefan Milo, the Danish admin who rigged a Raspberry Pi and a piece of fruit to dispense wireless network login …

  1. TimeMaster T
    Coat

    Aww ...

    I liked the Banana version better, it was more appealing.

    1. petur

      Re: Aww ...

      Maybe it runs on a banana pi to compensate

    2. Warm Braw Silver badge

      Re: Aww ...

      It's just the original software reskinned...

      1. Darryl

        Re: Aww ...

        Nobody liked my Dole-ing out tokens comment before, and now it's pointless. (fruitless?)

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Having bad some beers lately with this guy, I can say that every company needs someone like him on-premise.

  3. Roq D. Kasba

    Do you unscrew the front to change the banana now?

    Seems like a bigger maintenance task now, although I suppose the fruit flies are kept down.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Do you unscrew the front to change the banana now?

      "the fruit flies are kept down."

      Time flies like an arrow.

      1. Neanderthal Man
        Boffin

        Re: Time flies like an arrow.

        Time flies like wind.

        Fruit flies like pears.

  4. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge
    Coat

    A standard touch screen?

    How tasteless...

    Mines the one with the guide on how to disarm a man armed with a banana in the pocket.

    1. allthecoolshortnamesweretaken

      Re: A standard touch screen?

      How do you disarm someone atticking you with a pointed stick?

      1. Stevie

        Re: How do you disarm someone atticking you with a pointed stick?

        Shaddup!

        oblig.

  5. Jonathon Green

    Close...

    ...but no banana.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    a classic palindrome

    a man, a plan, a banana, ananab anal panama

  7. TeeCee Gold badge
    Coat

    Odd really.

    You'd have thought that a commercial version would be more likely to bear fruit.

    1. Captain DaFt

      Re: Odd really.

      >groan< That was appalling, have an upvote.

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