back to article Visual Studio Code: How to integrate Git

Visual Studio Code is a new, lightweight, cross-platform and open source code editor that you can download for free at http://visualstudio.com. In the second of this short series of articles, published in association with Microsoft, Tech Evangelist Sergii Baidachnyi, will dive into the editor's Git-related features. (In case …

  1. Charles Manning

    Why this obsession?

    People always seem to want to do everything through one GUI. This seems to be very much a "Windows mindset" or "Java mindset" issue.Where's the benefit?

    What is the real advantage in using your IDE to do source control? Surely it is just as easy to use a source control tool to do source control? This is very much more the *nix way of doing things: smaller tools that you plug together rather than monolithic tools.

    Whenever you work with a large IDE (VS or Eclipse), you have to drink the Kool Aid and pretty much hand over your whole project to the IDE. You end up having to work the IDE's way. No room for other workflow.

    1. Deltics

      Re: Why this obsession?

      To be fair, this *is* taking smaller tools and plugging them together. It's VS Code + Git, not a VS Code version control alternative to/replacement for Git.

      Stop using VS Code and switch to a different editor/IDE... your Git repo's are still there and still Git.

    2. NomNomNom

      Re: Why this obsession?

      "What is the real advantage in using your IDE to do source control?"

      True, but in the same way, what is the real disadvantage in using your IDE to do source control?

      1. Marco Fontani

        Re: Why this obsession?

        what is the real disadvantage in using your IDE to do source control?

        Depends on the IDE integrations (what do they do when you press "sync"? git pull --rebase origin/master? git pull?) and how your team/company uses DVCSes (github workflow, master/develop/feature branch, etc).

        If the two (integrations vs team workflow) are aligned with each other, there is no disadvantage! For a team or org which uses "the github workflow" the clicky interface on an IDE or on the Github client is likely the right answer.

        If your team instead needs all PRs to be rebased to master, with all errors and mistakes done when committing fixed up and squashed, reasonable commit messages, blah blah… then there's a possibility your bog-standard IDE Git integration may not be enough for it.

    3. sorry, what?

      Re: Why this obsession?

      When you use an IDE to do sophisticated actions like major refactorings it's pretty much essential for the IDE to at least be able to checkout, delete or add files to your version control system.

      1. Marco Fontani

        Re: Why this obsession?

        I look forward to a nice, usable UI that makes git commit -p better than it is :|

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Why this obsession?

      This seems to be very much a "Windows mindset" or "Java mindset" issue.

      With Windows, the IDE has to do everything, because the OS doesn't come with anything to aid development. It's a consumer OS!

  2. g00se
    Linux

    SSH?

    Git, afaik, needs SSH. Teaching Windows to do that is a bit like getting a cat to bark isn't it?

    1. Warm Braw Silver badge

      Re: SSH?

      I suspect the answer to making Windows go "ssh" is similar in principle to how you make a cat go woof, but you probably have to turn the hose on it afterwards...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: SSH?

      Teaching Windows to do that is a bit like getting a cat to bark isn't it?

      It's awful, isn't it? Windows just isn't designed for the Internet or development.

      Every application that attempts to support SSH needs to bundle its own library and needs to be configured separately, you're lucky if it supports keys and/or non standard ports and not even a shared ssh_config.

      This should be a standard part of the OS! (at least in the "Programs and Features")

    3. Mark 65

      Re: SSH?

      I think git offers multiple ways to communicate: git, http/s, and ssh amongst them. Local being the other choice.

  3. TheOtherMatt

    Hooks?

    Integration with other tools (CI, analysis, reporting etc) is more difficult than it needs to be as VS's version of the git client doesn't support hooks (and looks like it never will), and the server side doesn't support hooks either (will be coming RSN). Once they have the basics of git working then maybe it might be useful.

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