back to article What should we do with this chunk of dead air? Ofcom wants to know

VHF isn’t just for voice. Ofcom is seeking advice on how to get things connected in the spectrum space between 30MHz and 300MHz. The regulator argues that lots of spectrum is underused, or not used for the most productive things. In its consultation (PDF), Ofcom says: This document aims to encourage investment and innovation …

  1. chivo243 Silver badge
    Facepalm

    dead air?

    How about marcel marceau's greatest hits?

  2. Roger Kynaston Silver badge
    Coat

    Dead Air? If farms are involved it will be deadly air. OK, I'm off or the associated methane could make for an explosive atmosphere.

  3. frank ly

    re. Three Cows

    Whatever you do, don't try to milk them.

    1. Peter Gathercole Silver badge

      Re: re. Three Cows

      Bullocks to you!

      1. AndrueC Silver badge
        Black Helicopters

        Re: re. Three Cows

        Oh pull the udder one.

        1. Graham Marsden
          Facepalm

          Re: re. Three Cows

          Obviously that pic is for anyone who doesn't know what a cow looks like...

  4. batfastad
    Joke

    Spectrum

    "The regulator argues that lots of spectrum is underused, or not used for the most productive things"

    Like DAB for instance?

    Just joking. I like the radio to sound like a potato. Underwater.

  5. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

    Odd choice

    Those bands seem an odd choice for IoT. Even al low-power 60MHz can cross the Atlantic, and efficient aerials for those frequencies aren't small.

  6. Commswonk
    Facepalm

    How on earth...

    ...has man managed to survive and develop without all this guff? The same way as he can continue to do.

    At the frequencies and powers Ofcom is discussing, we are looking at long range, low bandwidth applications: using wirelessly connected sensors for “smart” farming, where fertiliser and water are automatically distributed across a farm to increase efficiency; <snip>

    Brilliant; a means of determining the need for water and fertiliser that necessitate every bit of arable land to be permanently plumbed. Yes; some crops do need irrigation (leafy ones, ISTR) but farmers and growers tow the necessary machinery to site and tow it away again when they have finished.

    Smart farming would see sensors sown into fields with grain to measure moisture at different depths below ground, or put into grain silos to monitor for temperature.

    Similar comment applies. "Smart farming" will see farmers not spending a penny more than they have to on gimmicky toys. A smart farmer monitors his land and its crops / stock himself and reacts accordingly.

    OTOH sensors that could detect and send out an alert when gates have been opened would almost certainly be of benefit to try to contain and hopefully stop the problem of sheep and cattle rustling, but doing that in a way that does not betray the system's presence to the determined snooper might not be easy; any such system would be frustrated by simply cutting the fence, so perhaps it isn't such a good idea after all.

    1. jgarry

      Re: How on earth...

      Well, if you would step out of the manure you are standing in, you might realize that farmers consider it a fixed cost, but using the proper analytics changes it to a variable cost you can cut by 25%. See http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2014/jul/17/aquaspy-drought-farm-water-conservation-monsanto/ for just one example.

  7. normcall

    Band One business Radio

    Many years ago I had a licence to use the the Business Radio part of Band One (55-60Mhz), even to the extent we had the only equipment that actually passed type appraisal (acquired from Simoco).

    Compared with our existing Mid Band (155-164Mhz) the performance was not acceptable for end users. Our erp was only 25w, and the RA (as it was then) did not allow us to try 50w to see if the interference and dead spots could be reduced to acceptable levels.

    I suppose that if had the time and money some of the problems could have been sorted. Use in 'normal' urban areas needed a far higher signal level for mobile use and the equipment sat on the shelf for some years unloved and unused.

  8. Commswonk

    Thinking about it...

    The farming community might just be grateful for broadband at a decent speed, or even any speed. Not that bits of low band spectrum seem likely to provide it for them.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    'ALLO DELTA X-RAY 'ALLO DELTA X-RAY CQ THE DELTA X-RAY EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ 'ALLO DELTA X-RAY 'ALLO DELTA X-RAY CQ THE DELTA X-RAY EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO EASY ABLE THREE JAPAN ECHO CQ CQ CQ CQ CQ 'ALLO DELTA X-RAY 'ALLO DELTA X-RAY

  10. Mage Silver badge

    DAB

    Turn off DAB and use it for FM Radio.

    76-90 is used in Japan

    The OIRT band in Eastern Europe is from 65.8 to 74.0 MHz.

    Some countries are considering extending FM below 87.5MHz.

    Existing sets (unlike DAB) can be converted using a less than £5 adaptor.

    Maybe add part of 175MHz to 220MHz too (where DAB lives)/.

  11. This post has been deleted by its author

  12. Zmodem

    remote controlled helicopters and drones, a few hundred meters has always been rubbish, a whole mile is better

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