back to article Is that a FAT PIPE or are you just pleased to stream me? TERABIT fibre tested

Proximus and Huawei have successfully trialled a super-channel optical signal, flinging out information at up to one terabit per second (Tbps). Tech lothario Huawei shacked up with Belgian box-wrecker Proximus back in January. The pairing has now produced a single super-channel optical transport network (OTN) card with a …

  1. Dazed and Confused

    Yeah

    Now when can I have one of these to my home?

    1. Amorous Cowherder
      Facepalm

      Re: Yeah

      Probably now if you like.....sadly it'll be joined to the local oversubscribed BT wholesale junction box!

  2. Bob AMG

    150% more?

    Are you maths correct?

    Surly its a 150% of its current speed or its 50% more.

    1. Patrick R
      Meh

      Re: 150% more?

      What numbers do you use? Or are you just assuming that the quote is wrong and that it cannot be 250%?

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Omg, what is it with the headliens?

    I don't care if this turns out to be an unpopular opinion, but OMG! reg, please fix your headlines. I enjoy the occasional immature headline or something with a story/tradition/inside joke, but we are way way past that point. These silly titles are cringe-worthy, clichéd, done to death and rarely ever make sense from a tech stand point, and even more rarely give you an idea about the actual story.

    Please, I enjoy the site, the content, the editors, the comments, the adverts, the anonymity when making this comment and later agreeing with myself, everything!!! but the damn headlines. They are utterly unclever and stupid.

    1. Sir Runcible Spoon
      Coat

      Re: Omg, what is it with the headliens?

      Not a FAT pipe either, more of a FAST pipe I would say :)

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Omg, what is it with the headliens?

        No, it's right the first time. Light travels pretty close to the speed of light in the fiber no matter what's traveling along for the ride. So being able to send more data along the same beam of light speaks of FAT rather than FAST.

        1. Sir Runcible Spoon

          Re: Omg, what is it with the headliens?

          Except that they improved the speed by eliminating delay, so it's faster :)

        2. Alan Brown Silver badge

          Re: Omg, what is it with the headliens?

          "Light travels pretty close to the speed of light in the fiber"

          Um....

          Light in a fiber travels at the speed of light in a fiber.

          (FWIW The speed of light in a fibre is 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum)

  4. Pascal Monett Silver badge
    Joke

    Ipswitch ?

    Are they sure their results didn't get some help from a tentacle ?

    1. Preston Munchensonton
      Coat

      Re: Ipswitch ?

      I thought it was the train to Bolton.

  5. Cassini
    Facepalm

    Headliens

    The "TERABIT fibre tested" part of the headline sort of gave it away for me.

  6. Amorous Cowherder
    Facepalm

    "Jeffrey Gao, president of the Huawei transmission network product line..."

    Do they have a corresponding "President of Receiving"?

    1. Martin Budden Silver badge
      Coat

      And a third president who is exhausted from running so fast between the other two.

  7. edwardbr

    I'm not a telco engineer but...

    Is 5.7 bits per second per Hertz

    the same as:

    5.7 bits per Hertz ^2

    Or should we be be just dropping the "per second" bit? as 5.7 bits per Hertz makes more sense to me...

    1. Suricou Raven

      Re: I'm not a telco engineer but...

      Bits-per-hertz is actually a simper way of saying exactly the same thing, yes. You're quite right. The bits-per-second-per-hertz unit is stated that way because it relates the number back to the situation in which it would be applied in the real world.

    2. Patrick Moody

      Re: I'm not a telco engineer but...

      Surely the units boil down to bits per cycle. My interpretation being that as 1 Hertz means 1 cycle per second:

      5.7 bits per second per Hertz

      =

      5.7 (bits/sec)/(cycles/sec)

      =

      5.7 bits/cycle

      Essentially they're talking about the bit-rate, versus the light-wave frequency (or cycle-rate) so the 2 rates per second cancel each other out leaving only the bits and the cycles. If you used a higher frequency carrier signal, you'd get a higher bit-rate and the impressive thing is increasing the bit-rate without needing to increase the carrier signal.

      Please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

  8. Kernel

    Not that advanced

    "Proximus/Huawei's transmission speed was conducted over a 1,040km fiber link using an advanced "Flexgrid" infrastructure with Huawei's Optical Switch Node OSN 9800 platform."

    There's nothing new about Flexgrid - it's an ITU standard and some of ALu's, and probably other vendors, optical products already support it.

    1. Alan Brown Silver badge

      Re: Not that advanced

      "There's nothing new about Flexgrid"

      Indeed, which means this just plugs into the rest of the network and isn't some esoteric experiment which is years away from deployment.

  9. Martin Budden Silver badge
    Megaphone

    "By reusing the existing optical platform..."

    And that right there is why FTTH makes sense and FTTN doesn't. Once you've got fibre going all the way, you can upgrade the signal technology as much as you like, forever. Would the Australian government please take note.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "By reusing the existing optical platform..."

      You can upgrade FTTN just as easily, can't you? And who cares about getting terabit rates to the last mile when consumers don't really need more than gigabit which can be done easily with copper?

      1. Alan Brown Silver badge

        Re: "By reusing the existing optical platform..."

        "And who cares about getting terabit rates to the last mile when consumers don't really need more than gigabit which can be done easily with copper?"

        Firstly: Let me know when you have symmetric Gb/s on _existing_(*) copper from the local phone cabinet to the customer's premises without using some crappy power sucking device that requires perfect lines less than 100 feet long and breaks as soon as you breath hard on it.

        Secondly: Having gotten all those GB circuits to the cabinet, at what speed do you intend to backhaul them to the local central office/concentrator node? What speed do you intend to backhaul from the concentrator/CO to the regional distribution node?

        (*) if you have to run new lines then they may as well be glass.

      2. Martin Budden Silver badge

        Re: "By reusing the existing optical platform..."

        You can upgrade FTTN just as easily, can't you?

        Only as far as the node. FTTN leaves non-upgradeable copper for part of the system, which makes the *entire* system throttled to the slow speed of the non-upgradeable part.

        consumers don't really need more than gigabit which can be done easily with copper?

        Remember the classic quote "640 K ought to be enough for anybody"? Didn't turn out so well, did it!

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