back to article Spanish TV journo leaves subordinates cowering after verbal shoeings

The news editor of Spanish regional television company Castilla-La Mancha Televisión (CLMTV) is herself in the news this week following accusations she persistently abuses her staff with foul-mouthed outbursts. According to recordings obtained by cowering subordinates, Victoria Vigón regularly offers frank off-camera analysis …

  1. Captain Hogwash

    Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

    What precisely are these failings?

    1. Lester Haines (Written by Reg staff) Gold badge

      Re: Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

      Too much of it apparently.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

        Too much of it apparently.

        By European standards that's too little. Come on, Espana si, Turkey no. Her name is Victoria not Gözde Kansu.

        And on the "el reg angle": it will be interesting how this pans out from the perspective of how other countries apply eligibility of covert recordings obtained by a private person without appropriate authority to record. USA this depends on state with most states having that as clearly inadmissible. Eu depends on country, but usually inadmissible too.

        1. Mephistro

          Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

          "it will be interesting how this pans out from the perspective of how other countries apply eligibility of covert recordings obtained by a private person"

          IANAL, but there have been other similar cases in Spain -usually in private companies- where similar evidence has been accepted -as corroboration of witness testimony, not as proof by itself- by the Spanish labour courts (which are separated from civil and criminal courts). The rationale is that in cases of bullying, this might be the only way for the victims to prove their cases.

          Anyway, being courts what they are, the final result is anybody's guess, depending on political pressure, media coverage and public opinion.

          Disclaimer: If I was Mrs. Vigón's boss, she'd be already unemployed.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

          I know in Texas case law has said that employees can record things to protect themselves. Some guy in Austin was accused of making sexual jokes, etc and he recorded the conversations to prove nothing was said.

          1. Sir Runcible Spoon

            Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

            If they are objecting to the recordings of the abuse, then surely someone just needs to lay in wait for the Vogon woman and deliver a good slapping beyond the view of anyone else. Hey presto - no crime was committed because even if someone got it on camera it would have been without permission!

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: failing to adequately address the issue of her cleavage

      Adequately addressing the issue of cleavage ... it is for this very reason that I sport a magnificent handlebar moustache.

  2. frank ly

    "In response, CLMTV said: ..."

    What's the Spanish for, "Let's shoot the messenger." ?

    1. Lester Haines (Written by Reg staff) Gold badge

      Re: "In response, CLMTV said: ..."

      "Matemos al mensajero"

      1. Matt 21

        Re: "In response, CLMTV said: ..."

        Too much......... I'm lost for words.

    2. Bob Wheeler
      Joke

      Re: "In response, CLMTV said: ..."

      The best defence is offence, or should that be offensive defence? Just aksing like.. :)

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    ahhhhhh so its their fault for recording everything! If the silly bint acted like that and spoke to us in that way where I work she'd be first in line for a smack in the mouth.

    1. NumptyScrub

      As far as I am aware, "because of what they said" is not a valid defense for violence charges anywhere in the EU, although I'm happy to be corrected. It is generally illegal to punch people for being mouthy fucks, regardless of how much you want to punch the mouthy fuck.

  4. Cosmo

    I'm learning Spanish at the moment...

    ...and it's great to hear some "real world" Spanish with swearing and threats to kill :D It's stuff like this that comes in handy!

    1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: I'm learning Spanish at the moment...

      Watching Home Alone 1 and 2 too much?

    2. Lester Haines (Written by Reg staff) Gold badge

      Re: I'm learning Spanish at the moment...

      Yes, it's quite a comprehensive lesson.

  5. Mark 85 Silver badge
    Trollface

    Did she go to the Steve Jobs School of Charm or take the Steve Ballmer "How to Win Friends and Influence People Course - Executive Level" Course? Enquiring minds and all that......

    1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

      More like the Linus Torvalds "Getting the best from contributors" class.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    She's just taking a leaf out of Australian journalists' books.

    Some time back we had an accidental on-mic moment where the presenter for a current affair's program on one of the commercial stations, berated people when she thought the camera was off.

    Then a week later, Kerry O'Brien, who hosted The 7:30 Report on the ABC, did the same thing.

    1. phuzz Silver badge
      Thumb Up

      Re: She's just taking a leaf out of Australian journalists' books.

      Well, given that they may be in trouble for recording a presenter, perhaps they should have just arranged for an "accidental" on-mic moment.

  7. This post has been deleted by its author

  8. Dan 55 Silver badge
    Meh

    This is news?

    It sounds like every Spanish workplace I've ever worked in.

    And also like every housing association meeting too.

    They're very forthright, the Spanish.

    1. Mephistro

      Re: This is news?

      Perhaps you've been unlucky. My experience is that managers and bosses -those with more braincells than fingers, at least- try really hard to prevent this kind of incidents, as they usually let the company open to being sued big time and generating lots of bad PR, as these cases are usually well covered by the press.

      I've seen this kind of thing over the years in two of my many clients. These managers verbally abused their staff often, even with a contractor (me) watching. In both cases I run like hell (after finding some suitable excuse). One of them was sued by several of his employees and lost the case. The other closed shop ~two years after my visit.

      Anecdotally, I also did some contract work for a small IT company with a dozen workers or so, where there was lots of verbal abuse going in both directions. A typical piece of conversation could be something like this:

      Boss:" employee_name, so mamón ¿cuando mé vas a dar el informe que te pedí?"

      Employee:" Te lo daré cuando a tí se te ponga de los cojones reclamarle a another_employee_name los datos que necesito.".

      I'm happy to say they're still in business. :-)

      YMMV, of course.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Typical Spanish attitude

    Put them in a position of power and they make plastic plods look submissive. Most of them think you're a personal belonging which can be ordered about without question and the sad part is usually the employees put up with it. Good to see some of them fighting back.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Typical Spanish attitude

      But it looks as if they will find themselves in trouble, not her, for recording the abusive behaviour. There is something wrong, in a power-protecting way, in any jurisdiction which makes it illegal to gather evidence of wrongdoing; but it's a favourite response of authority.

      I can't recall who it was, but a civil rights person in the US remarked last week that the most effective weapon for black Americans in the fight against racism was the video recording capability of the iPhone. It's just done for one policeman.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Typical Spanish attitude

        >But it looks as if they will find themselves

        Nah, that's again typical protect the prima dona blustering. They can't deny the evidence so mount a counter claim to try to frighten them. Just add it to the list of abusive behaviour.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Typical Spanish attitude

          "Typical Spanish attitude

          Put them in a position of power and they make plastic plods look submissive."

          I've generally found that when people claim that "All X have Y trait" they are talking out of their hats. I live in Spain and I haven't seen power-related dickishness as peculiarly Spanish...in my experience the ratio is about what you would experience in the UK. There's powerful people who are OK and there's assistant managers going mental with a tiny bit of power, same as anywhere else.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Typical Spanish attitude

            Funny that because I've generally found the same to be true about people who take generalisations as absolute.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Typical Spanish attitude

              Touché

  10. Schlimnitz
    Trollface

    Goodness

    What would have happened if she hadn't got her steak and chips?!

  11. Anonymous Coward
    IT Angle

    El Reg now a Gossip paper?

    Where is the IT, science or technology angle in this?

    El Reg desperate to expand into Murdock territory?

    1. Loud Speaker

      Re: El Reg now a Gossip paper?

      Cleavage generally comes under the scientific category of "Biology" in my country. YMMV.

  12. Stork Silver badge

    In some places (DK) it is legal to record conversations you take part in (probably with more qualifications). But it sounds like this was more like a monologue...

    1. Dan 55 Silver badge

      In Spain audio recordings of third parties without you being part of the conversation are not accepted as evidence and you might find you could be charged for not respecting somebody's right to privacy. If you are part of the conversation then it might be accepted or you might be charged for not respecting the data protection act.

      It either has to be a video recording or happen in front of two witnesses who are willing to testify.

      That doesn't mean they can't be used to exert pressure on someone as in this article. But they could get charged for their trouble.

  13. This post has been deleted by its author

    1. Queasy Rider

      "Without knowing the context... How do you know she wasn't provoked by her co-workers in the minutes before that recording?"

      That's no excuse for her abusive, and lack of professional, conduct. How about reading the article again. "She persistently abuses her staff with foul-mouthed outbursts." "Staff expressed their concerns to management at CLMTV at the beginning of 2014." "Inspector of Work and Social Security rules the matter a "very serious" breach of employment law."

      How much more context do you need?

      PS. "you have no way of knowing whether she really means the threats or not."

      Maybe YOU don't know if she really means to KILL anyone, but rational people do know the difference between abusive, empty, over the top threats such as hers, and real threats to kill such as Taliban or ISIS. It's not the threats, it's the abuse. Geddit?

      1. This post has been deleted by its author

        1. Queasy Rider

          Give it a rest. She's a foul-mouthed abusive harpie getting her comeuppance, and you're acting like a trolling contrariean. I don't care where she uttered her latest outburst, there's plenty of evidence that this is an ongoing problem, and I for one would not want to only have the choice to hear her shit or quit my otherwise satisfactory job in television. You're starting to sound like Matt Bryant. Save your lawyering for people that deserve it. You've made many good points in the past. Please don't negate any good will you've built up by defending the indefensible. Leave that to the shysters.

          Respectfully...

          1. This post has been deleted by its author

          2. This post has been deleted by its author

            1. This post has been deleted by its author

              1. Queasy Rider

                Re: @Queasy Rider - "You're starting to sound like Matt Bryant. "

                Or the point of the recording is that is what she is always like, no need to wind her up. I admit that I'm prejudging her, but it has been my experience that when employees finally screw up the courage to stand up to their boss it is not because this is the first or even the tenth time their boss has pulled this shit. It is because they are sick and fed up with it and it is either risk getting fired by speaking up, quitting, or living with an ulcer and taking it out on your family at home. Why you are defending somebody like her is beyond me.

                1. This post has been deleted by its author

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "Without knowing the context...whether she really means the threats or not"

      I don't know about Spain, but in this country the police take death threats against identifiable individuals (where an attack is physically possible) rather seriously.

      Journalism seems to have a most unpleasant culture of aggression, from the revelations about the British press. Perhaps it's time people stopped trying to defend it, and fixed it.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Boffin

      It's probably a breach of internal company policy, but the making such a recording for private use, (which does NOT include it's publication on the internet), would be unlikely to result in legal proceedings against the person who made it.

      On the other hand, publishing it, so that the whole world can, (and likely will), judge her and form an opinion based on less than two minutes of audio recording, which can easily be taken out of context, is clearly wrong.

      Without knowing the context, you have no way of knowing whether she really means the threats or not. How do you know she wasn't provoked by her co-workers in the minutes before that recording?

      While I'm not going to speculate on whether the alleged abuse takes place on a regular basis, one thing is clear. You may make such recordings for private use, but strictly private use only. You need the other party's consent to use those recordings for publication, either after the fact, or ideally, prior to commencement of the recording.

      I'm no lawyer, but I understand the laws in most countries are very clear on this… Those recordings technically could not be used in a court of law as they were not collected with the other party's consent. A transcript of the recording, however, could be used.

      While this in no way excuses the alleged abuse, the person doing this recording cannot be excused for overstepping a boundary regarding the publication of secret recordings. The people concerned could have jeopardised their chances of prosecution by doing this.

  14. Howard Hanek
    Childcatcher

    Quite simple really.

    A defective tanning bed causing a hormonal imbalance aggravated by defective makeup leading to toxic shock syndrome.......is my best guess. She should be given a six month sabbatical in order to detox and regain her equilibrium.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Quite simple really.

      "She should be given a six month sabbatical in order to detox and regain her equilibrium."

      As the late Auberon Waugh once suggested in a slightly different context, sentenced to spend six months on a Scottish island on a diet of brown rice, being taught Buddhism.

      That should ensure a lack of recidivism.

  15. earl grey
    Trollface

    'Too much of it apparently.'

    pics or it didn't happen.

  16. Dr Scrum Master
    IT Angle

    Dacre

    Any recordings or transcriptions of one of Paul Dacre's cuntings, or even double-cuntings?

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