back to article Crossbar says it's 'one step' from delivering miracle RRAM

Crossbar has jumped a hurdle limiting the readability if its resistive RAM non-volatile memory tech and says commercialisation is getting closer. Crossbar's resistive RAM (RRAM) tech is a 3D semi-conductor structure promising higher densities and faster access than NAND; closer to the fabled uniform memory that's as fast as …

  1. Michael H.F. Wilkinson Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    Very interesting read

    We live in exciting times. It is great to see many different groups of extremely smart people trying to create breakthrough technologies to make impossible things possible

  2. malle-herbert
    Thumb Down

    "Crossbar RRAM is targeting 100,000 write cycles"

    Which will make it barely any better than SLC flash and unusable as a replacement for DRAM...

    What happened to that 'nearly unlimited' number of write cycles they promised ?

    1. Sir Alien
      Mushroom

      Re: "Crossbar RRAM is targeting 100,000 write cycles"

      Unlimited write cycles don't sell more drives.

      They need to design failure into the product to ensure you buy more.

      Even if the failure is only 5 years later. That and technology moves on so the only long term unlimited(ness) you will get is from mostly embedded stuff that sits around for 25+ years.

      The average "Joe" will likely get a new drives simply for speed, size or just a new drive with a new (tablet, phone, pc, whatever)

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "Crossbar RRAM is targeting 100,000 write cycles"

      Yep, that suggests that the byte-addressability will come with a mapping layer for wear balancing, just like flash, all so that "for i=1 to 100000" doesn't melt an "i"-shaped hole. Wonder if that will steal some performance (power & time)?

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