back to article Beijing to Washington: Ratted-out routers not welcome here

China has taken revenge on the USA for its Huawei ban and router-ratting actions alleged by Edward Snowden, by announcing a new “vetting” process for foreign technology providers. The news emerged in Xinhua, a party-controlled Chinese news organ that reports State Internet Information Office spokesperson Jiang Jun as saying “ …

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  1. This post has been deleted by its author

    1. GloriousVictoryForThePeople

      Re: TRUST? HUH?

      "Heck,,,I don't even trust my own tinfoil hat & i made it."

      And so you shouldn't - someones probably swapped the tin for cheaper aluminium.

      1. plrndl

        Re: TRUST? HUH?

        "And so you shouldn't - someones probably swapped the tin for cheaper aluminium."

        Foiled again!

  2. Schultz
    Holmes

    And that's why an open market requires an open society

    Until quite recently, the western democracies (especially the US) preached that economic development requires open markets and that open markets require an open, democratic society. Somehow this message got lost in the big swirl of international finance and trade. But now we can start to see how secretive systems erode trust and ultimately erode the free market.

    Funny how the US is leading this development just like they led the campaign for free markets. So where is the world heading if / when the international markets go the way of the lemmings?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: And that's why an open market requires an open society

      US has never practiced what it preached.

      It has forced everyone else to remove national interest protection from their merger and acquisition law. It has retained them. Ditto for national security, etc.

      The open market idea as practiced at present is extremely one sided - it is open one way (to the bigger bully).

      1. Ossi

        Re: And that's why an open market requires an open society

        "It has forced everyone else to remove national interest protection from their merger and acquisition law."

        Any evidence for this statement?

        National interest protection law has never been particularly successful anyway. Although France's yoghurt industry has continued to thrive.

        1. Warm Braw Silver badge

          Re: And that's why an open market requires an open society

          >France's yoghurt industry has continued to thrive

          That's not national interest, it's their culture...

          1. Parash2

            Re: And that's why an open market requires an open society

            >France's yoghurt industry has continued to thrive

            That's not national interest, it's their culture...<

            That's very good....

        2. Richard Taylor 2
          FAIL

          Re: And that's why an open market requires an open society

          Protectionism allowed the US to flourish. If you care to read a little history and not simply be ignorant then you might know about it. I'll give you a little starter (from the Wall Street Journal) http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052748704696304575538030239055918

  3. Tim Roberts 1

    bully boy

    The US has been the economic bully boy of the world for a long time, and has forced unfair trade agreements on countries that cannot afford to say no. Now comes the time when another country has at least as much power as they have and are willing to exert it. Tough on you USA, but I'm not surprised nor particularly upset by it.

    1. Yag

      Re: bully boy

      Worse is... the European Union should be able to wield the same kind of power.

      If the officials were not sold to the lobbies.

      Lobbies that are mostly funded by US companies...

      Where did the word "Corruption" and "Treason" went?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: bully boy

        Would that be the European union that so many in the UK don't want to belong to?

        Still we can always leave and sit on the sidelines singing Land Of Hope and Glory, pretending we still have some influence in the world.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: bully boy

          Still we can always leave and sit on the sidelines singing Land Of Hope and Glory, pretending we still have some influence in the world.

          As opposed to sitting on the sidelines seeing our presence being used to pretend we support the EU being used to exert German influence in the world?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: bully boy, more like pushover...

      Shows how much you know, there has never been a recent trade agreement that has worked out for the US. All we do is let/push our jobs overseas to get minor reductions in product pricing and half hearted parity. Economic bully boy? Are you ever living in the past. Not in the last 20 years, look at how well NAFTA worked out for the common man and thats on our own continent. China needs us as much as we need them, but I don't want ANY more trade agreements for ANY reason. They only make things more favorable to a few corporations

      1. Fazal Majid

        Re: bully boy, more like pushover...

        "Shows how much you know, there has never been a recent trade agreement that has worked out for the US."

        Whether those trade agreements work for the US as a whole is debatable, but they certainly work very well as designed for those in power. Just like how the Iraq war was an unmitigated disaster that will cost anything from $2 Trillion to $4Tn when all the costs are tallied, but helped make Dick Cheney and his cronies billions in war profiteering. The net total is highly negative for the US as a whole, but it's all upside for those who made the decision.

        1. Abacus

          Re: bully boy, more like pushover...

          @Fazal Majid.

          Well said. Very well said indeed.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Where did the word "Corruption" and "Treason" went?

    Corruption is here all right (not like it ever went anywhere).

    Treason however, has long gone to a place that is extremely well described in one of the best French movies from the late Noir period: "The Death of a Corrupt Man".

    http://www.amazon.com/Death-Corrupt-Man-Mort-pourri/dp/B00DRCCQ7S

    Just watch the Klaus Kinski monologue describing the _REAL_ relationships between government and business (about 2/3rds of the way through it). It is Eu and WTO exemplified (long before the WTO became a reality and the Eu became what is today).

    This movie should be shown before every election to us as a reminder to exactly what our politicians and police really are. Unfortunately the only countries to continue showing it are actualy Russians and Eastern Europe. It has been silently censored and removed from the public eye in the west. Rather unsurprsing - it strikes too close to home.

    1. Ossi

      Re: Where did the word "Corruption" and "Treason" went?

      It's been "silently censored". By whom, I'm curious to know? (Although they seem to be oddly incompetent, seeing as it's available on Amazon, YouTube etc).

      "...the only countries to continue showing it are actualy [sic] Russians and Eastern Europe."

      Any evidence for this comment? But your belief is a curious one. Russia, my dear friend, is not famous for its open society and welcoming attitude to free speech.

      1. Grikath

        Re: Where did the word "Corruption" and "Treason" went?

        "French movies from the late Noir period"

        There's your answer... The only "censorship" involved is that movies of that bent only appeal to well... hardly anyone.

  5. Zog_but_not_the_first
    IT Angle

    Business opportunity?

    I predict a growth in craft electronics. Routers made from discrete components with settings changed by flicking toggle switches. All locked behind a stout door locked with a big brass key.

  6. Fibbles

    Vetting

    "Or are we headed for a situation in which great powers simply decide not to trust sensitive products made by their geopolitical rivals?"

    I'd be very surprised if this vetting of foreign products didn't happen already (at least behind closed doors,) with bidding processes manipulated to keep out potentially hostile companies. Maybe we will move to a world where governments are more upfront about it, though part of me suspects that even if the rest of the world locks foreign competitors out of their infrastructure projects the UK will still be buying its gear from 'Trustworthy Mr.Cheng - Purveyor of secure equipment and definitely not a spy'.

  7. Jim O'Reilly
    Holmes

    Cyber Cold War

    There's clearly a cyber battle between the US and China, and it extends to commercial espionage. Why everyone is excited about just network gear escapes me. All of the large US companies, and all the Chinese brands, make their servers, PCs, tablets and phones in China.

    They all have firmware and are easier to compromise. The solution is to treat firmware as software, and load it at the final user from a trusted source.

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