back to article US public sector shuns public clouds

US government spending on cloud technology is set to spike in the next two years, though security concerns have scared agencies away from public clouds. Spending by US federal agencies on private cloud services will grow from $1.5 billion in 2012 to $1.7 billion in 2014, then rocket up to $7.69 billion by 2017, according to …

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  1. Kev99 Silver badge

    I don't believe it. The US is actually doing something somewhat intelligent. I cannot believe companies and people are will to place their trust in "The Cloud" with reports every day of hacks, password dumps, user thefts, et cetera. I'll stick with my little 3TB NAS attached to my PC.

    1. Tom 35

      No

      The federal agencies don't want all the other federal agencies to be snooping in their cloud.

      But they still will. After all there could be another leaker just about anyplace.

    2. PhilBuk
      Facepalm

      Sorry, but according to the latest advertising blurb I got from Staples, a 3TB NAS is a 'cloud'. Bloody marketing crap.

      Phil.

  2. Don Jefe
    Meh

    Cost

    Good lord that's a lot of money. The entire Curiosity mission to Mars cost ~$2.5B, including ongoing operations and at least something is being accomplished. They're going to spend $10's of Billions on cloud services and everything will still be behind schedule, over cost and unable to keep government functioning in a remotely efficient manner.

    I'd rather have a few more rovers and the government droids keep the tech they've got until they can reach at least WWII operating efficiencies with it. We've given them equipment to do things unimaginable 60 years ago and they've actually gone backwards in efficiency and productivity. Maybe we should let them go back to smoking cigarettes in the office.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Black Helicopters

    They're probably concerned about getting snooped on by the NSA or it's compatriots.....

    We're all thinking it, I just said it!!

  4. Daniel B.
    Holmes

    Not surprised

    Really, the US Government (or any country's government) shouldn't be trusting in any kind of private cloud solution and/or colocation. They have the money to host it themselves, and they should be hosting it themselves. It's their responsibility!

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

    2. Don Jefe

      Re: Not surprised

      You said responsibility and U.S. Government in the same statement. We're sorry sir, that flight has already departed.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    WTF?

    We've been there before....

    So we have government officials being pushed into problem domains where they have no operational experience, taking advice from the very corporations that will be providing the services and/or equipment, all with little to no oversight by (elected?) officialdom without a clue about the subject. Isn't this how all the other train wrecks have happened in the past? And not just in IT.

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