back to article Inside the iPad mini: Pray you never have to open one

It's no wonder why the iPad mini assemblers at Foxconn rioted – its innards are fiendishly complex and tightly packed. Well, to be honest, we don't really know if the iPad mini's complexity contributed to those Chinese workers dissatisfaction, but if what the tool-parts-and-repair folks at iFixit discovered when they …

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  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Why does everyone moan that you can't get such a thing open?

    My car is bloody hard to repair but do I moan?

    Do people moan that their TV, Microwave, Dishwashers are hard to open and repair? nope. They're appliances just like an iPad is.

    1. David Webb

      I think you would be pretty pissed off if your car needed a new wheel and you couldn't replace it. TV's and such are probably repaired by people who enjoy doing that kind of stuff, computer geeks really should get turned on by being able to replace component X when it decides to give up the ghost rather than throw away a £400 object because a £20 thingy inside threw a bit of a wobbly.

      Dishwashers and TV's (as well as washing machines and fridges etc.) are usually repaired by a bloke called Bob who can take out a faulty part and replace it (unless it's not economical to do so), small appliances like microwaves are possibly not economically (or safety) viable to be taken apart to replace some stuff.

    2. Annihilator Silver badge
      Thumb Down

      "My car is bloody hard to repair but do I moan?"

      Erm, it's generally not. As for the rest of your examples, nope, they're not too hard to open and repair either.

    3. Tom 35

      Do people moan that their TV, Microwave, Dishwashers are hard to open and repair?

      No, because they are not. Half the time you can do a repair with one screwdriver.

      Replacing the battery on my iPod was a bitch.

    4. Spoddyhalfwit

      @AC "My car is bloody hard to repair but do I moan?"

      You should get one like mine... The designers thoughtfully put a large hatch above the engine which opens when I pull a lever under the dashboard. Genius!

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Right so how many people would replace a defective turbocharger - you might open the bonnet to check the oil or top up the washer fluid but for over 99% of people that's as far as it goes. All these devices (and it's not just Apple) can be repaired by someone who knows what they are doing and has the right tools - i.e. same as your local car garage.

        1. ElReg!comments!Pierre
          Unhappy

          Just a question

          Is there a reason why you guys all post as anonymous?

          Seriously, it sometimes looks like one of you anons want to discuss a separate point but in the end it's all lost in the generic anonymous soup.

          1. This post has been deleted by its author

        2. James Micallef Silver badge
          Boffin

          "Right so how many people would replace a defective turbocharger "?

          That's not really the point, is it? Most people do not repair their own cars, so the question is, "how easy is it for a competent mechanic to replace a defective turbocharger?"

          By the very nature of El Reg, a good proportion of readers will have both the interest and the competence to service their own computing equipment and replace some parts, but this is a lot less (or even at all) possible with iKit.

          And seeing that someone mentioned cars, this IS a gripe I have with cars. My dad's old car, pop open the bonnet and all the innards were there, I could see every components and know what it did. Pretty much every screw was a standard flat or Philips (cross), and every nut or bolt was a standard hexagon. Modern car engines are packaged much more tightly and use all sort of esoteric screw and bolt heads just so that you have to take it to a garage to do teh simplest servicing. And that's not even mentioning the electronics...

        3. Vic

          > Right so how many people would replace a defective turbocharger

          I would. As would most of my mates.

          > top up the washer fluid but for over 99% of people that's as far as it goes

          No. that's as far as it goes for people who've never been in the situation where, if they don't fix it, nobody else will.

          Most things are easily fixed if you've a mind to do so. Apple kit is exceptional, in that it is very hard to get into it to fix.

          Vic.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        @AC 21:02 be careful

        Don't suggest things like levers to open service access ports, next thing you know you'll be getting letters from Apple lawyers through the door because they had them first, with rounded corners.

    5. peter 45
      Facepalm

      You never had a Renault Megane then?

      You had to take the tyre off just to change a headlight bulb. One step ahead of Apple who would insist you bought a whole new car I suppose.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: You never had a Renault Megane then?

        So, do you have to disassemble most of your Megane to change the battery?

        Because that would be a better analogy...

      2. John 172
        Go

        Re: You never had a Renault Megane then?

        No you don't, you just need to go to a garage where they have a 'specialist'**

        ** specialist == fellow with strangely long arms.

    6. ElReg!comments!Pierre
      FAIL

      Do people moan that their TV, Microwave, Dishwashers are hard to open and repair? nope.

      TVs, microwave (ovens) and dishwashers are a doodle to open and repair with a standard set of screwdrivers and a multimeter. It may not be worth the hassle since the cost of the replacement part may exceed the cost of buying a new unit, but still technically extremely easy. There is actually a whole lot of semi-charity businesses that specialize in collecting "dead"/outdated appliances, getting them repaired by unskilled, minimally-trained ex-prisonners, ex-hobos or disabled people, and selling the repaired units at low cost. Their "catalogs" usually include TVs, microwave ovens, stoves, dishwashers, washing machines, dryers, vacuum cleaners, and the like. They get around the issue of the cost of replacement parts by taking working parts out of dead units to fix the less-dead ones. Any minimally-trained hobo provided with a screwdriver, a multimeter and a soldering iron can do it (and yes, the result is dependable; that's how I got all my appliances when I was a student).

      That is also how I get the lab's rather more high-tech equipment going in these times of scarce funding (but that takes a "bit" more knowledge than what is needed to repair a dishwasher).

      There is a significant overlap between the "Save-Mother-Gaya" category of people and the "If it's 3 years old it goes to the bin" category of people, and a lot of the overlap is comprised of Apple apologists.

      What was your point again?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Do people moan that their TV, Microwave, Dishwashers are hard to open and repair? nope.

        "TVs, microwave (ovens) and dishwashers are a doodle to open and repair with a standard set of screwdrivers and a multimeter."

        There you have it. I suspect most people do not even own a multimeter / know what one is - let alone a soldering iron and the required skills.

        Apple apologists - it's hardly 'only' Apple and in reality their stuff tends to be supported / lasts longer anyway.

      2. Lexxy

        Re: Do people moan that their TV, Microwave, Dishwashers are hard to open and repair? nope.

        "getting them repaired by unskilled, minimally-trained ex-prisonners, ex-hobos or disabled people"

        It's interesting that you think disabled people fit into this little stereotype of hobos and ex-prisoners, Pierre.

        1. ElReg!comments!Pierre
          Paris Hilton

          @ Lexxy

          "It's interesting that you think disabled people fit into this little stereotype of hobos and ex-prisoners, Pierre."

          I do not think (too tiresome). These outfit are litterally staffed by minimally-trained ex-prisonners, ex-hobos or disabled people. They even make a big fuss about it. That is their very raison d'être.

          It's interesting that you think I meant otherwise, Lexxy.

    7. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Batteries - which need replacing

      Lithium polymer batteries have got a life of about three years, and their capacity drops each year. It takes about 5 minutes to replace a car battery, a minute to replace the battery on a remote control, and five minutes to replace the battery on a Blackberry or Samsung phone, including the power down and power up. Not so on an iDevice.

      The battery is designed to be hard to replace and, in the case of this iPad mini, very obviously so. This gives iPhones and the like a three year life.

      One reason that Blackberry gets a negative perception is that there are still so many ancient BBs soldiering on. I've just passed on to an OAP a 2006 Nokia phone in excellent condition and more than adequate for her needs, having been able to get a new replacement battery for it for £3.

      Samsung tablets and phones have easily swappable batteries. The new Asus Padfone and the Blackberry Playbook can easily have batteries replaced with a simple tool. There is simply no excuse for requiring a complete dismantle - including glue - just to replace a battery.

      It would be possible for Apple to use lithium iron batteries which are safer, if slightly larger, and have a realistic 5 to 7 year life, so don't tell me this isn't built in obsolescence.

    8. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I've repaired my fridge, dishwasher, wifes car, tv, and a control board on the boiler after the plumber told us what part it was but basically refused to come back for a week to actually fit it after letting us do the leg work of getting old of it.

      (Anon as working on boilers, with when your just replacing an eletronic coponent with molex type connectors is forbidden).

      1. Nick Pettefar

        I think your typewriter/keyboard needs repairing.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    uncertain battery power

    hook it up to a load and measure current/voltage against time?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: uncertain battery power

      Or don't give a damn just worry about the runtime.

  3. Robot

    Nice try with the Chinese but ...

    My wife tells me that your Chinese translation of "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!" is okay for the first part, but the second part has the rough sense of "I am not going to pick up this item or take up this thing anymore". Ha ha, lost in translation. Glad that Google maps are more reliable.

    1. Quxy

      Re: Nice try with the Chinese but ...

      Yeah, I think Google Translate short-changed Rik on the verb. I would think that something like 我不打算继续下去了! would make more sense for the second half.

    2. M Gale

      Re: Nice try with the Chinese but ...

      Yeah, ends up coming back as "Ino longer tolerate, I do not intend to put it." The joys of translation!

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Wonderful how people like Amazon 'guess' and get it wrong - wonder how long before they fix that?

    1. Eddy Ito

      Technically

      If the speakers are fed from a single channel then it's monaural not stereo. That said, I can't imagine why they would include a second speaker and neglect stereo output when I assume the necessary circuit is already there for the headphone jack.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Technically

        From Apple's tech specs page about the iPad mini, in the "TV and Video" subsection: "... 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats ... 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats ... PCM stereo audio in .avi file format."

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Technically

        The other issue is that the speakers have to be far enough away in order to be stereo. Sure two speakers are required but if they are too close, you can't tell the difference between the right and the left channel. If you have two speaker straight in front of you, could you tell the left and right channel? It would sound the same as a mono speaker in the same place.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: speakers have to be far enough away in order to be stereo

          Like the speakers in the Transformer Prime are separate channels, but are next to each other and on the back, so any stereo separation is completely lost.

          Both PlayBook and Galaxy Tab have speakers on the front, Kindle fire has speakers on the sides. All are well separated.

    2. ElReg!comments!Pierre

      Re: wonder how long before they fix that?

      My guess is, they won't. I don't have a horse in this sorry excuse for a steeple-chase, but Apple started that with their steady "the specs don't matter, we offer better user experience" stance* that they episodically spice up with "our specs are actually better than the competition's"**.

      When the "leader" in the field engages in baseless banter, downright libel, and generalized bamboozlment (Apple vs Samsung anyone?***), you can't really blame the upcomers for trying a watered-down version of the same.

      With the latest row of failed patent lawsuits all around the world including an upcoming major slap in the US, traditionnally its stronghold, Apple's new clothes seem more and more see-through to the rest of the industry, and I doubt that Amazon will ever back down even if the original claim proves false.

      --

      * which may make sense, for a category of users I wish I could avoid. As for me I like to make my own "user experience", thank you very much.

      ** demonstrably wrong most of the time but you can't blame slimy marketting people for being slimy: that's what they are paid for. True for Apple's as for anyone else's.

      *** not to mention the cherry-picked comparisons with a 5-month-old competitor product when launching a new gizmo... hello iPhone5, so you're saying you're kinda sorta better than an Galaxy S3 in some ways -most of which are design-based, some would say "slavishly" inspired by the "far more popular" S3-, and that's your main selling point, 5 month late in a year-based release market? Way to innovate.

  5. NoneSuch Silver badge
    Joke

    OK, that is one ripped apart.

    Only a few million more to go then...

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    How many of these tablets (from any maker) are genuinely easy to repair - basically not for the average joe.

    1. Tom 35

      "Nexus 7 Repairability Score: 7 out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair)"

      The iPad mini gets a 2.

      They say "Battery replacement can be accomplished without soldering—or even a screwdriver." for the Nexus 7. I've replaced iPod batteries and it's a bugger of a job.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    ... and next I'll just rip my car apart for the hell of it - oh no maybe I'll just take it to the garage like 99.9% of everyone else.

    1. M Gale

      What...

      ...just to check the sparkplugs?

      U crazy bro?

      1. Dave 126 Silver badge

        Re: What...

        The iPad doesn't have any spark plugs! But seriously, its covered by at least a two year guarantee as a condition of being sold in the EU, and the only 'repairs' that can realistically be made to this class of device are swapping out dead components for new ones... you'd have to be very skilful to repair an issue on the main PCB, and good luck getting hold of a spare CPU.

        I'd be interested in seeing how many of these things do fail between years 2 and 4 of use, just so an even handed cost / benefit analysis can be made of allowing the enthusiastic repairman have a go.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Related Headlines

    Inside The Porsche 911: Pray You Never Have To Drop The Engine

    Inside Your Head: Pray You Never Have To Remove A Section Of Your Skull

    Inside Windows 7: Pray You never Have To Troubleshoot Error #3715

    and many other things you'll never attempt...except for that last one. Ugh.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Related Headlines

      Well, after the last one, you'll feel like attempting the second one. You may even feel like combining all three:

      "Inside Windows 7: Troubleshooting error #3715 leads to attempting to remove a section of your skull by dropping a Porsche 911 engine onto it"

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Related Headlines

      "Inside The Porsche 911: Pray You Never Have To Drop The Engine"

      Why? Is it because it takes a whole 45 minutes?

      1. ElReg!comments!Pierre

        Re: Related Headlines

        I did not run the numbers and I do not own a 911 (unfortunately) but 45 minutes to drop the engine seems pretty sharp. I was expecting double that at least, based on less-sophisticated cars I had to deal with.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Related Headlines

          Surely the Porsche 911 has a racing heritage, and speed of servicing is very important in endurance races.

        2. Vic

          Re: Related Headlines

          > I did not run the numbers and I do not own a 911 (unfortunately)

          Nor I.

          > but 45 minutes to drop the engine seems pretty sharp

          Depends.

          The 911 is heavily influenced by its Beetle heritage. There are extra supports, but the main mount to the gearbox, is similar, I believe.

          I used to be able to do a clutch replacement on a Beetle in about 35 minutes...

          Vic.

  9. JeffyPooh
    Pint

    Where is the GPS chip again?

    Just wondering...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

      GPS in the 3G model - unless you get lost in your house?

    2. Mark Whelan

      Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

      And where's the GPS in MS Surface RT..?

      From www.theregister.co.uk/2012/10/26/surface_review/

      "Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0 are included, but not GPS or mobile broadband – two omissions which have caused disappointment among some potential early adopters."

      Surprising lack of complaints about this in the comments...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

        "And where's the GPS in MS Surface RT..?

        [...]

        Surprising lack of complaints about this in the comments..."

        That would require people to summon up the enthusiasm to care about the MS Surface, which may be asking a lot right now.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

        If you plump for the wifi model is GPS really an issue - sure would be nice to have but almost all of these will spend their time at home / work where there is wifi - hardly outside where there often is not? I mean if you are sitting in starbucks you know where you are so GPS has almost no value - if you are up a hill you would not have internet anyway so probably no mapping. Unless you bought specific mapping software in which case you would probably have bought the specific model WITH GPS (and 4G).

        1. Ramazan

          Re: If you plump for the wifi model ... will spend their time at home

          Wrong, you can enable WiFi Access Point on some 3G/4G phones, and there are portable WiFi/3G/EV-DO routers powered by pair of 18650 batteries for example.

          I for one am certainly tired having to maintain and regularly pay for several SIM, microSIM and R-UIM cards in every goddamn device, and I think I only need one in my phone, which I ought to exchange for WiFi AP capable model long time ago

        2. Chris Parsons

          Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

          Completely wrong, I use the GPS in my Wifi-only Nexus 7 as a backup when I'm flying. It works very well. and is cheaper than the cheapest proper aviation GPS. You can't plan a route with it, but it shows you where you are.

          1. M Gale

            Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

            You've got to have turned directions on at least once for the giggle factor, surely?

            "In 500 yards, tuIn 1 mile, tuYou have reached your destination!"

            Wonder if bitching betty could keep up with flying speeds?

        3. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Where is the GPS chip again?

          Actually, a Blackberry Playbook has GPS and if you are at all interested in astronomy it works very well with planetarium applications. And then there are downloadable map applications. Why do I want to pay for a phone contract if I can download maps at home.

          Yes, they are iSheep.

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Just make sure that...

    It's not in your pocket towards the end of December, judging by part number 5 in the list: "Apple 338S1077 B0MB1228"

  11. 142
    Stop

    Nope...

    Two Speakers != Stereo.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Boffin

      Re: Nope...

      Got a multimeter handy? Seems that's the only way we'll settle it.

      If it's mono, both terminals will be connected together. Otherwise, at most just one terminal on each speaker will be common.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Nope...

        "If it's mono, both terminals will be connected together. Otherwise, at most just one terminal on each speaker will be common."

        Unless it is monaural, and each speaker is driven from a separate output channel on a stereo amplifier for a bit more volume - not an uncommon trick.

      2. This post has been deleted by its author

      3. 142

        Re: Got a multimeter handy?

        Not if each speaker is separately amped (for efficiency as said elsewhere here), but just using a single common DAC. The easiest way to settle it is to play a piece of test audio...

        To be honest, it's hard to imagine why they'd do that as they've already got a two channel headphone amp, which needs a two channel DAC, but given the size and cost constraints, it's one of the things that they could have compromised on...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Nope...

      can you get reasonable stereo effect when they are that close together?

      1. M Gale

        Re: Nope...

        Yes. For example, the original Galaxy Tab, and the Nintendo *DS consoles.

        1. M Gale

          Re: Nope...

          Downvoted? Really?

          Has Mr Red Button Fetish actually owned the old Tab 7, or any iteration of the DS?

          Stereo. Small distance between speakers. Works. Has separation. Fuxache.

      2. 142
        Thumb Up

        can you get reasonable stereo effect when they are that close together?...

        Yes, you'd try to arrange the speakers such the sound comes out sideways, not just towards the listener - so that the left hand sound bounces off nearby objects on the left, making it sound as though the speaker is further in that direction than it actually is.

        Laptops often blatantly use this trick, by sending the sound sideways and downwards, away from the listener, so that it bounces off the desk its sitting on.

    3. 142
      WTF?

      Re: Nope...

      Who downvoted that, lol? In what way was my statement incorrect?

  12. Nanners

    Suddenly

    I want a ipadmini. How did that happen?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Suddenly

      That happens with most small pretty things we see naked... um, out in the open, I mean exposed... Argh.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Suddenly

      All hail hypnotoad...

    3. Martin Huizing
      Trollface

      Re: Suddenly

      Easy, you are a masochist and want to see Chinese workers suffer.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Suddenly

        "...you are a masochist and want to see Chinese workers suffer..."

        That would make him a sadist

  13. TRT Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    +1

    for the Duchamp reference. Nice one!

  14. ElReg!comments!Pierre

    Small screws, you say?

    Most of these screws look several times bigger than what you usually have to cope with when taking a camera appart. Not to mention watches.

    Before you ask, yes, I do own a dissection microscopes for these purposed; my sight is not what it used to be -mostly due to, well dealing with small screws and their murine counterparts- and old dissection microscopes can often be spared a grim end in the skip in my line of work.

    As for the sneezing issue: a few strong magnets are indeed useful as temporary strorage docks for the little fuckers.

    1. ElReg!comments!Pierre
      FAIL

      auto-fail Re: Small screws, you say?

      Oh the typos, they are hurting. Can't be arsed to withdraw and repost so deal with it.

      1. Martin Huizing
        Trollface

        Re: auto-fail Small screws, you say?

        Dude! The typos are hurting my eyes! Can you please be arsed and repost? I can't deal with this..

        Sincerely,

        Marty McFly

        1. ElReg!comments!Pierre
          Trollface

          Re: auto-fail Small screws, you say?

          Hello Farty McMy

          the psycho are raping your arse, you say?

          I will whip them in line ASAP

          Seriously, I will

          No, really.

          I mean it.

  15. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    What? No political rant from Myslewski this time? I'm disappointed.

  16. RefriedNoodle

    Why stereo?

    What's the point of having two speakers on the iPad, given that it can be held in portrait or landscape? I'm sure a little background music will sound better with 2 speakers when reading an iBook in portrait, but it'll be useless when you rotate the thing 90 degrees to watch a movie.

    I always thought this was one reason why Apple never bothered to put more than 1 speaker in it anyway, given the 4-way orientation possibility.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Why stereo?

      The obvious method is to stick them in diagonally opposed corners and swap channels depending on orientation.

  17. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    It was true then

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/06/ipad_mini_case_photos/

    Seems it really was a leaked photo of the iPad Mini Case and not a cheap fake like some of the fanbois suggested.

  18. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Repair

    I think the point is being missed on the ability to repair.

    If Apple moulded the screen/components to the casing as was suggested in the article, then there would be no-one else other than Apple who would be able to "repair" the device.

    The cheaper sole trader repair shops would disappear and Apple would be able to charge what they like and provide whatever level of service they like too.

    This obviously doesn't just apply to Apple.

    I can see this happening in the future with all the equipment manufacturers where they seal the devices to make them unrepairable by not just Jo Public, but your small business techie too (easyish to do with Tablets, smartphones, etc)

  19. Brian Miller 1
    Stop

    Actually a two speaker system can still be mono

    Having 2 speakers does not a stereo make. The channels on stereo carry seperate audio information to allow the listener to hear the sounds coming from different places. A "3d" effect for the ears so to speak.

    You can simply duplicate the mono information adn send it down two channels but that is not stereo sound. It is mono over two speakers.

    I do not know if the device is mono or not but your assertion that two speakers == stereo is false.

  20. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Serviceability is important

    All well manufactured items should be designed with replacement, repair and upgrade in mind. It doesn't matter whether it's a washing machine, vacuum cleaner, electrical heater, car or consumer electronic device.

    Good vendors, like say Hoover, have a really excellent design standards - there stuff is easy to take apart, well laid out and they have affordable, accessible spares department. (No I don't work for them, I've just fixed a lot of white goods, and some are absolute bastards to work on due to poor servicing design). Guess what - every time I want a new appliance, I look for that brand, cos I know either I or a trained engineer can repair it cost effectively.

    Now I'm not suggesting everyone will have the tools or skills to replace or upgrade their latest e-tablet or e-video/music player, but the components which wear out before the usable lifetime of the device - like the battery - should not require an engineering degree and a clean-room to swap it out.

    This is what pisses people off with Apple products - it would take no effort at all to make the battery a slide-out /push-in-to-fit component, without affecting the functionality or appearance of the device, yet they bury the thing inside. This is a cynical ploy to have their product expire well before the end of its useful life, to force you to buy a full replacement.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Thumb Up

      Re: Serviceability is important

      One of my work colleages had enough problems with the home button on her iPhone 4 failing. She suffered along without a Home button until the iPhone 5 was released.

      If it weren't such a bastard to open, I'd imagine it'd have been fixed months ago.

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