back to article Australia prepares for Martian first contact

As NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory mission descends on Mars today, Australia’s facilities in Canberra and the legendary telescopic space mecca, Parkes will be yet again playing a significant role in space exploration history. The Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex (CDSCC), which the CSIRO manages on NASA's behalf, will …

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  1. Nordrick Framelhammer
    Trollface

    Hmmmmm, I wonder...

    Does anyone think that the Aussies will find a martian capable of helping them win more than one gold medal at The O Games?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Hmmmmm, I wonder...

      It's nice that the hosts of the Olympic Games are doing so much better than usual. They deserve it. As for Australia doing poorly at sport, it is probably sufficient that we have one of the best economies in the world. It would be greedy to rob the world of any additional gold.

      1. Nordrick Framelhammer
        Trollface

        Re: Hmmmmm, I wonder...

        Ahhh, but it isn't sufficient. The Sydney Morning Herald today listed the country at 9 in medal count as AUS Zealand.

        http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=10825019

        Still, we will be happy to help our lesser talented cousins in The West Island with their erecent slump in sports.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Hmmmmm, I wonder...

          With so many Kiwis in Australia, it is natural to assume that we have been invaded, and are now part of New Zealand. Consequently, it would appear that we now have four gold medals.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Hmmmmm, I wonder...

        "it is probably sufficient that we have one of the best economies in the world"

        You meant "it is probably sufficient that we have one of the most polluting economies in the world". You know, with the highest per capita emissions of any major developed nation. Maybe there's a gold medal in that?

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Coat

    Just something to watch out for..

    Strange shifting electromagnetic radiation fields due to the ancient Prothean ruins' mass effect reactor.

    .. my coat is the one with Normandy SR2 on the sleeve.

  3. Graham Wilson

    Same for the original moon landing in1969.

    It's just that the RX dishes were strategically placed in a good location, back in 1969 a good earth-based connection to NASA was also a key requirement.

  4. itzman
    Big Brother

    Excuse me sir, you cant park that here..

    ..without a disability sticker, and paying a 60million Martian dollar parking permit, which can only be obtained from Europa..

    On Mars, socialism rules and that means 'alle is verboten' unless you have filled in the right forms in triplicate.

    They don't call it the Red planet for nothing, you know.

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