back to article Cloud 'will spur server sales'

Investments in private and public clouds will spur worldwide server sales over the next four years to the tune of $9.4bn (£5.8bn), according to IDC. The bean counter estimates 1.2 million systems that underpin public cloud deployments will be shipped by 2015, a compound annual growth rate of 21 per cent and 570,000 servers to …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
  1. Steven Jones

    Spur server sales?

    I'm not sure I understand this - surely cloud computing is meant to increase the efficient use of computing resource by making increasing virtualisation, dynamic load redistribution, shared redundancy, the common use of shared resources, thin provisioning and all those other good things that we are being told of. No doubt there will have to be expenditure on new resources to realise this dream, but if it doesn't result in less hardware being purchased in the long run, then something has surely failed.

    Of course the suspicion that this is yet another over-sold concept by the IT industry selling impossible dreams to gullible senior management cannot possibly be true...

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    No it wont... for the obvious reasons...

    No it wont... for the obvious reasons...

This topic is closed for new posts.

Other stories you might like

  • HPE Greenlake to power Taeknizon private cloud expansion in UAE
    Isn't this the definition of a middle man?

    Why build a cloud datacenter yourself, when you can rent one from Hewlett Packard Enterprise? It may seem unorthodox, but That’s exactly the approach Singapore-based private cloud provider Taeknizon is using to extend its private cloud offering to the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Founded in 2012, Taeknizon offers a menagerie of services ranging from IoT, robotics, and AI to colocation and private cloud services, primarily in the Middle East and Asia. The company’s latest expansion in the UAE will see it lean on HPE GreenLake’s anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform to meet growing demand from small-to-midsize enterprises for cloud services in the region.

    “Today, 94% of companies operating in the UAE are SMEs," Ahmad AlKhallafi, UAE managing director at HPE, said in a statement. "Taeknizon’s as-a-service model caters to the requirements of SMEs and aligns with our vision to empower youth and the local startup community.”

    Continue reading
  • OMIGOD: Cloud providers still using secret middleware
    All the news you may have missed from RSA this week

    RSA Conference in brief Researchers from Wiz, who previously found a series of four serious flaws in Azure's Open Management Infrastructure (OMI) agent dubbed "OMIGOD," presented some related news at RSA: Pretty much every cloud provider is installing similar software "without customer's awareness or explicit consent."

    In a blog post accompanying the presentation, Wiz's Nir Ohfeld and Shir Tamari say that the agents are middleware that bridge customer VMs and the provider's other managed services. The agents are necessary to enable advanced VM features like log collection, automatic updating and configuration syncing, but they also add new potential attack surfaces that, because customers don't know about them, can't be defended against.

    In the case of OMIGOD, that included a bug with a 9.8/10 CVSS score that would let an attacker escalate to root and remotely execute code. Microsoft patched the vulnerabilities, but most had to be applied manually.

    Continue reading
  • PC shipments sink amid steady waves of supply chain, war disruptions
    320 million units forecast, still well above pre-pandemic, but boom is over for now

    Orders for PCs are forecast to shrink in 2022 as consumers confront rising inflation, the war in Ukraine, and lockdowns in parts of the world critical to the supply chain, all of which continue.

    So says IDC, which forecast shipments to decline 8.2 percent year-on-year to 321.2 million units during this calendar year. This follows three straight years of growth, the last of which saw units shipped rise to 348.8 million.

    Things might be taking a turn for the worse but they are far from disastrous for an industry revived by the pandemic when PCs became the center of many people's universe. Shipments are still forecast to come in well above the pre-pandemic norms; 267 million units were shipped in 2019.

    Continue reading
  • To multicloud, or not: Former PayPal head of engineering weighs in
    Not everyone needs it, but those who do need to consider 3 things, says Asim Razzaq

    The push is on to get every enterprise thinking they're missing out on the next big thing if they don't adopt a multicloud strategy.

    That shove in the multicloud direction appears to be working. More than 75 percent of businesses are now using multiple cloud providers, according to Gartner. That includes some big companies, like Boeing, which recently chose to spread its bets across AWS, Google Cloud and Azure as it continues to eliminate old legacy systems. 

    There are plenty of reasons to choose to go with multiple cloud providers, but Asim Razzaq, CEO and founder at cloud cost management company Yotascale, told The Register that choosing whether or not to invest in a multicloud architecture all comes down to three things: How many different compute needs a business has, budget, and the need for redundancy. 

    Continue reading
  • Amazon to spend $12b on five more datacenters in Oregon
    You have died of dystopia

    Amazon plans to build five more datacenters in rural Oregon at estimated cost of $11.8 billion, according to documents filed in Morrow County last week.

    The project would more than double the cloud colossus' datacenter footprint in the county. Amazon, home of AWS as well as an online shopping empire, operates four datacenters along the Columbia River, roughly 150 miles east of Portland, according to Oregon Live, which first reported on the planned expansion on Thursday.

    If approved, construction of the five facilities would take place over the next four-five years, with the first facilities coming online in late 2023 and the last slated for early 2027.

    Continue reading
  • PC sales start to ebb as pandemic buying spree ends: IDC
    Analyst says it's not a 'downward spiral' as sales are still defying predictions

    Shipments of PCs have finally slowed down after two years of double-digit growth, declining worldwide by 5.1 per cent year-on-year in Q1 2022, market research firm International Data Corp (IDC) said on Monday.

    While the decline reflects both rising costs and market saturation in some segments, IDC reassured it in no way represents a "downward spiral." For one, even though notebook PCs declined, desktops grew slightly. For another, the numbers exceeded earlier forecasts.

    Vendors still shipped over 80 million desktops, notebooks and workstations during the quarter – and did so for a seventh consecutive quarter. Such a feat hasn't happened since 2012.

    Continue reading
  • IDC: Public clouds to surpass non-cloud spending this year
    So long as the economy stays healthy, and supply can catch up to demand

    IDC forecasts that spending on compute and storage systems for cloud infrastructure will grow 21.7 percent this year compared to 2021. Spending on public clouds is also expected to pass that of non-cloud infrastructure in 2022.

    The research firm made the predictions as part of its latest Worldwide Quarterly Enterprise Infrastructure Tracker: Buyer and Cloud Deployment report, which follows the proportion of compute and storage hardware products that are being sold into cloud environments.

    IDC found that in 4Q21, total spending on cloud infrastructure increased 13.5 percent to $21.1 billion compared with the same quarter in 2020. This was the second consecutive quarter of year-on-year growth, with IDC noting that the ongoing supply chain constraints have depleted vendor inventories over the past several quarters, which means that pent-up demand will likely lead to more growth in future, so long as the supply chain can keep up.

    Continue reading
  • APAC region's PC market growth flattens out
    COVID saw sales surge, but there's less reason to buy in the new normal

    The APAC region's market for traditional PCs - desktops notebooks and workstations - grew 15.9 per cent year-on-year in 2021 to 120.3 million units, but shipments appear to have peaked according to analyst firm IDC.

    Notebooks topped 2021's sales charts, growing 17.5 per cent year-on-year to 77.3 million shipments while desktops grew by 11.8 per cent to 41 million.

    "The Asia Pacific region benefited from significantly improved supply in the second half of 2021," said IDC analyst Matthew Ong. "With slowing demand in mature economies like the United States, PC vendors began to prioritize countries in Asia/Pacific, which led to much-needed backlog order fulfillments and inventory replenishments."

    Continue reading
  • US biz to blow $120bn on AI by 2025, says IDC
    Get ready for machine-made decisions, whether you're shopping, banking, reading, working

    Corporate funding splurged on AI technology is expected to grow to $120bn by 2025 in the US, a yearly increase of 26 percent over the next four financial years, according to IDC.

    The two largest industries ramping up investments in machine learning are retail and banking, according to the market research firm. Together they are predicted to make up 28 percent, nearly $20bn, of investments by 2025. The fastest rate of spending increase, however, will come from media and financial trading businesses. AI investments for these markets are projected to grow 30 percent year over year. Automated claims processing and IT optimization will be growth areas, increasing 30 and 29.7 percent respectively every year until 2025.

    "The greatest potential benefit for the use of AI remains its use in developing new business, and building new business models," Mike Glennon, senior research manager with IDC's Customer Insights & Analysis team said.

    Continue reading
  • Despite shortages, networking hardware market grew strongly in 2021
    Any port in a storm

    Analyst firm International Data Corporation (IDC) has found that the global market for switches surged during 2021, despite shortages that have seen delivery of some products delayed for many months.

    Worldwide ethernet switch revenues grew at 11.8 percent year-on-year to US$8.5B in Q4 2021 while router market revenues grew at seven percent year-on-year to US$4.6B. From an annual perspective, the Ethernet switch market experienced a 9.7 percent increase to deliver sales of US$30.7B for 2021 and the router market experienced a 6.5 percent increase to US$15.9B.

    Overall switch port shipments increased 13.0 per cent in 4Q21 and rose 16.2 per cent on an annualized basis in 2021, suggesting increased revenue correlated to more devices and capacity shipping rather than vendors getting away with price hikes during shortages.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022